Jocelyn DoddResearch Centre for Museums and GalleriesSchool of Museum StudiesUniversity of LeicesterInspiration, Identity,...
Inspiring Learning
Inspiring Learning for AllPeople Providing more effective learning opportunitiesPlaces Creating inspiring and accessible l...
Learning Impact Research Project(LIRP)• What is learning in museums, libraries and archives?• Measuring learning in museum...
Life-long learning• Learning plays an integral part in our everyday lives (Wenger,1998)• Learning is as crucial and fundam...
What does learning include?• Discipline-based (history, science, geography)• Daily life and how to manage it (hospitals, s...
Using prior knowledge and experience• Build on what we already know• Use existing knowledge in new situations• Learn somet...
Different levels of attentionThe spotlight – tightly focused attention, specific targetThe floodlight – open-ended, open-m...
Sources for learning: verbal and tacitTacit, feltVerbal,articulated
Gardner’s Multiple Intelligences• Linguistic• Logical-mathematical• Musical• Spatial• Bodily kinaesthetic• Interpersonal• ...
Learning as meaning-making•Learners construct meaning on their own termsno matter what teachers do. (Richardson,1997:62)•C...
What is learning?•Learning includes emotions, attitudes, inspiration, aswell as acquisition of facts.•Learning is both int...
What are we measuring?•Outcomes and impact of learning•Not learning processes•Not learning objectives•Learning outcomes – ...
Learning in MLA•Informal, flexible, open-ended sites for learning•No set or required learning objectives•No agreed learnin...
Learning is a process of active engagement with experience. Itis what people do when they want to make sense of the world....
Generic Learning OutcomesAction, behaviour, progressionSkillsAttitudes and valuesEnjoyment, inspiration, creativityKnowled...
Teachers views of the GLOs0%10%20%30%40%50%60%70%80%90%100%RR1: 2003 DCMS/DfES1:2004RR2: 2005 DCMS/DfES2:2007Enjoyment,Ins...
4th ( 2006-7) study Strong evidence of powerful learningoutcomes for pupils99% of teachers felt that it was likely that th...
Was the workhouse so bad?
Learning impactWas the workhouse so bad?Action, behaviour,progressionIncreased attainment in assessed workMotivated to lea...
Learning outcomes - young people are very positive0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100%I enjoyed todayWorking w ith the museum has been ...
Salford Museums working with refugees and asylumseekers“…when the teenagers askedquestions ………… I was verycomfortable beca...
Learning impactNadeem - Salford MuseumAction, behaviour,progressionIncreased confidenceDeveloped a sense of place (Salford...
Image and identityManchester Art Gallery, V & A and NCH
Lisa - Manchester Art Gallery, V & A and NCH
Lisa’s social worker‘It has had a holistic effect. The project has impacted onher in every way - emotionally, on her menta...
Learning impactLisa – Image & IdentityAction, behaviour,progressionProgression – developing her self identity, selfesteemt...
Strengths of using the GLOs•Provide common conceptual framework and a systematic approachto researching museum-based learn...
Robust evidence• On the basis of the success of the Learning Impact Research Project ,RCMG was commissioned by DCMS/ DfES ...
Limitations• Is learning valued?• Is a broad definition of learning shared?• The challenges of data collection• Impact v p...
Research Centre for Museums and Galleries (RCMG)School of Museum Studies, University of LeicesterJocelyn Doddjad25@le.ac.u...
Inspiration, Identity, Learning - capturing evidence of the impact of museum visits
Inspiration, Identity, Learning - capturing evidence of the impact of museum visits
Inspiration, Identity, Learning - capturing evidence of the impact of museum visits
Inspiration, Identity, Learning - capturing evidence of the impact of museum visits
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Inspiration, Identity, Learning - capturing evidence of the impact of museum visits

  1. 1. Jocelyn DoddResearch Centre for Museums and GalleriesSchool of Museum StudiesUniversity of LeicesterInspiration, Identity, Learning - capturing evidence of the impact ofmuseum visits
  2. 2. Inspiring Learning
  3. 3. Inspiring Learning for AllPeople Providing more effective learning opportunitiesPlaces Creating inspiring and accessible learning environmentsPartnerships Building creative learning partnershipsPolicies/ plans/performancePlacing learning at the heart of the organisation
  4. 4. Learning Impact Research Project(LIRP)• What is learning in museums, libraries and archives?• Measuring learning in museums, libraries and archives• Development of a conceptual framework to measure the outcomes andimpact of learning
  5. 5. Life-long learning• Learning plays an integral part in our everyday lives (Wenger,1998)• Learning is as crucial and fundamental as being alive (Claxton,1999)• Learning is what we do when we don’t know what to do(Claxton, 1999)
  6. 6. What does learning include?• Discipline-based (history, science, geography)• Daily life and how to manage it (hospitals, schools)• People and places• Ourselves• Different domains for learning – all necessary
  7. 7. Using prior knowledge and experience• Build on what we already know• Use existing knowledge in new situations• Learn something new• Bruner’s ‘spiral curriculum’
  8. 8. Different levels of attentionThe spotlight – tightly focused attention, specific targetThe floodlight – open-ended, open-minded, cruising andbrowsing
  9. 9. Sources for learning: verbal and tacitTacit, feltVerbal,articulated
  10. 10. Gardner’s Multiple Intelligences• Linguistic• Logical-mathematical• Musical• Spatial• Bodily kinaesthetic• Interpersonal• Intrapersonal• Naturalistic• Syntax, semantics• Number, relationships• Pitch, rhythm• Mental visualisation• Control of body, objects• Empathetic• Aware of self• Classification,environment
  11. 11. Learning as meaning-making•Learners construct meaning on their own termsno matter what teachers do. (Richardson,1997:62)•Constructivist learning theory (Hein, 1998)•Social constructionism (constructed realities,perspectival, situated knowing) (Fay, 1996)
  12. 12. What is learning?•Learning includes emotions, attitudes, inspiration, aswell as acquisition of facts.•Learning is both intentional and unintentional.•Learning in museums is inspired by and arises fromcollections but is not necessarily about the collections.•A focus on the ‘outcomes and impact of learning’reveals the dimensions of learning in museums
  13. 13. What are we measuring?•Outcomes and impact of learning•Not learning processes•Not learning objectives•Learning outcomes – the result of learning•Learning impact – the result of theseoutcomes over time, from a broadperspective
  14. 14. Learning in MLA•Informal, flexible, open-ended sites for learning•No set or required learning objectives•No agreed learning outcomes•Users set own standards and agendas for learning•But - learning very important to users
  15. 15. Learning is a process of active engagement with experience. Itis what people do when they want to make sense of the world.It may involve the development or deepening of skills,knowledge, understanding, awareness, values, ideas andfeelings, or an increase in the capacity to reflect. Effectivelearning leads to change, development and the desire to learnmore.MLA Museums, Archives and Libraries CouncilInspiring Learning for All framework
  16. 16. Generic Learning OutcomesAction, behaviour, progressionSkillsAttitudes and valuesEnjoyment, inspiration, creativityKnowledge and Understanding
  17. 17. Teachers views of the GLOs0%10%20%30%40%50%60%70%80%90%100%RR1: 2003 DCMS/DfES1:2004RR2: 2005 DCMS/DfES2:2007Enjoyment,Inspiration, CreativityKnow ledge andUnderstandingAttitudes and ValuesAction, Behaviour,ProgressionSkills‘For each of the following potential outcomes from the use of the museum, please could you rate theimportance of each one in your view?’ Teachers ticking ‘very important.’ 3478 teachers 2003-07
  18. 18. 4th ( 2006-7) study Strong evidence of powerful learningoutcomes for pupils99% of teachers felt that it was likely that their pupils had enjoyed the museumexperience99% thought that new interests had been aroused97% of teachers thought that their pupils were likely to have been inspired tolearn more94% of teachers thought it likely that their pupils would have increased theirsubject-related understanding94% of teachers felt it likely that their pupils would feel more positive aboutlearning generally94 % Of teachers think their pupils are likely to have developed thinking skills &89% communication skills90% of pupils enjoyed their visit & think they have learnt something
  19. 19. Was the workhouse so bad?
  20. 20. Learning impactWas the workhouse so bad?Action, behaviour,progressionIncreased attainment in assessed workMotivated to learn more – used other sourcesSkills Real historical skills, analysing data , making judgementsAttitudes and values Were shocked inmates did not get their own coffinEnjoyment, inspiration,creativityMemorable , inspired them to write at length, emotionalengagementKnowledge andUnderstandingUnderstood things in new ways ( not reading)Different perspectives, complexity
  21. 21. Learning outcomes - young people are very positive0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100%I enjoyed todayWorking w ith the museum has been veryinspiring for meI discovered some interesting thingsI feel I have a better understanding of thesubjectIt w as a good chance to pick up new skillsUsing the museum w as a good chance tolearn in new w ays I had not consideredbeforeI could make sense of most of the things w esaw and didI w ould like to do this againI am now much more interested in the subjectthan w hen I startedCommunity GirlsCommunity BoysPupil GirlsPupil BoysKS3, 4 and 5 Pupils, N=3337, Young people and adults (Community), N=391
  22. 22. Salford Museums working with refugees and asylumseekers“…when the teenagers askedquestions ………… I was verycomfortable because I wasvery sure of myself because Iknew the right thing. I am theperson who has seen it all and Ican tell them something.”
  23. 23. Learning impactNadeem - Salford MuseumAction, behaviour,progressionIncreased confidenceDeveloped a sense of place (Salford)Work with other organisationsCatharsis – coming to terms with being a refugeeFuture family aspirations – for her sonSkills Computer skills, Language skills , Social skillsResearch skillsAttitudes and values Increased self worthIncreased understanding of her new situationEnjoyment,inspiration, creativityEnjoyment and regular commitmentKnowledge andUnderstandingKnowledge & understanding a work placeKnowledge of local history
  24. 24. Image and identityManchester Art Gallery, V & A and NCH
  25. 25. Lisa - Manchester Art Gallery, V & A and NCH
  26. 26. Lisa’s social worker‘It has had a holistic effect. The project has impacted onher in every way - emotionally, on her mental health,physically and on her ability to manage situations, it hasreally impacted on her in every way’. Lisa has looked andanalysed, and learnt skills which have helped her toexpress who she is. This has built her confidence, as forexample when she has confidently talked to largegroups of adults. Her most recent representation of heridentity illustrates a considerable move forward, andnow she is thriving and achieving in every direction; inschool, making friends, doing very well at swimming,cycling and dancing.
  27. 27. Learning impactLisa – Image & IdentityAction, behaviour,progressionProgression – developing her self identity, selfesteemthriving achieving in other areas of her lifeSkills self expression, confidence,communication skills -talking to adultsAttitudes and values attitude towards herself ,self perception, self worthEnjoyment, inspiration,creativityenjoying the art galleryinspired by artistsbeing creativeKnowledge andUnderstandingof artunderstanding herself, of her own identity
  28. 28. Strengths of using the GLOs•Provide common conceptual framework and a systematic approachto researching museum-based learning and its outcomes•Provide agreed categories for classifying the statements ofvisitors/users•Enable move from ‘anecdote’ to ‘evidence’.•Can be used to describe breadth and depth of outcomes of learning•Can link quantitative and qualitative research
  29. 29. Robust evidence• On the basis of the success of the Learning Impact Research Project ,RCMG was commissioned by DCMS/ DfES in 2003 to carry out evaluationresearch into their Strategic Commissioning Museum EducationProgramme. At the same time, RCMG was commissioned by MLA toresearch the impact of Renaissance in the Regions funding (centralgovernment funding for regional museums) in 36 regional museums.• The results of this research, when presented as part of the Museums,Libraries and Archives Council’s (MLA) submission to the ComprehensiveSpending Review in 2004, was described by DCMS and the Treasury (intheir feedback to MLA) as the ‘most compelling evidence’ which played asignificant part in securing an extra £15 million pounds for the museumsector.Keith Nicol DCMS
  30. 30. Limitations• Is learning valued?• Is a broad definition of learning shared?• The challenges of data collection• Impact v process• Strategic leadership• Established method v novelty and innovation• Whole organisational buy in• Research skills / costs of robust research
  31. 31. Research Centre for Museums and Galleries (RCMG)School of Museum Studies, University of LeicesterJocelyn Doddjad25@le.ac.ukwww.le.ac.uk/museumstudies/research/rcmg

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