AHRC Workshop  The Role of Creative Economy inDeveloping and Sustaining Vibrant and prosperous Communities in the UK    Bi...
‘those industries which   have their origin in   individual creativity,   skill and talent and   which have a potential   ...
1. Rise of CreativityInformation and Knowledge economyInnovation and competitivenessEmphasis on bending rules, operating a...
2. Artists/ Entrepreneurs• Joseph Schumpeter: development through  entrepreneurs not ‘organisation men’• Entrepreneurs are...
3. Cultural EconomyEmployment and wealth generation as culturalconsumption increasesCultural or symbolic dimension of func...
Aesthetisisation of Everyday Life
Cultural Economy• Post-fordism – niche, ‘just in time’, flexible  specialisation• New consumption-led economy of niche and...
Creative IndustriesCreative industry skills at a premiumFrom Artisanal hangover to ‘cutting edge’ of neweconomy‘Creativity...
Specific Value?•   Symbolic•   Expressive•   Attention•   Experience•   Cultural?    They clearly draw on art and culture,...
Culture and artKey concepts in cultural and creativeindustries policies yet remain in suspendedanimation.
CultureAnthropological: shared meanings, practicesof everyday life, beliefs, “culture is ordinary”This challenged by moder...
Aesthetic art• Aesthetics 18th century – divided modernity• Distinct realm of experience and knowledge  different from tha...
Popular CultureThis applies not just to art but to ‘popular culture’These intertwined and infinitely complicated theanthro...
Value and ValuesIf cultural then these products have a specifichistory and set of values – for producers,consumers and for...
Cultural IndustriesBut they are clearly economies and they havereal economic effects and impact.Any democratic cultural po...
Creative Cities• Cities as a crucial horizon for collective identification:  complex and conflicted communities.• ‘Creativ...
Creative Economy and Connected              CommunitiesVibrancy, Prosperity, Sustainability, Resilience, Well-beingHow do ...
1. Language of economics displaces culture• Ignores the idea that a culture economy is also about culture!• Overrides care...
2. PropertyMain winners from the growth of arts and creativeindustries – property developers.Property prices go up quicker...
3. Consumption and Branding• Consumption drives out production as large  retail and other organisations take advantage  of...
4. Creative Labour•   Huge gap between rhetoric and reality of ‘creative work’•   Persistent low pay and (self) exploitati...
Creative Economy and Disconnected            CommunitiesIn these ways Cis contribute to fragmentation andexclusion, from c...
SustainabilityModernism, Capitalism and endless consumptionIncreased turnover of cultural forms and productsAesthetisisati...
1. Re-thinking Terms
Creativity as hierarchy
Cultural Industries         ArtDesign         Media
Services                                                            PR, Marketing                                         ...
2. Specifics of PlacePath dependency and evolutionary economicsHistories: of governance; industries and skills;families, c...
Soft Infrastructure• Embedded forms of memory, learning and  collaboration• Communities of practice: ethics, aesthetics,  ...
Differentiated ecosystems• Clusters and networks• Different industries (film, music, design…)• Different knowledges: tacit...
Cities are ChangingGrowing diversification of spatial use in cities –inner and outer suburbs, small towns, rural areasReco...
Urban ChangeNew levels of digital infrastructure and flowsof information through the cityReconfiguration of the possibilit...
Urban GovernanceNew possibilities for dialogue and co-creativemanagement of cultural ecosystemsCultural policy: not just p...
Imagined Communities• Planning• Collective• Fragmentation of cities – how do we rethink  and organise the horizon of the u...
A New Modernity?
Presentation by Professor Justin O’Connor Queensland University of Technology, Australia
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Presentation by Professor Justin O’Connor Queensland University of Technology, Australia

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Presentation by Professor Justin O’Connor Queensland University of Technology, Australia

  1. 1. AHRC Workshop The Role of Creative Economy inDeveloping and Sustaining Vibrant and prosperous Communities in the UK Birmingham 6-8th December 2010 Justin O’Connor QUT
  2. 2. ‘those industries which have their origin in individual creativity, skill and talent and which have a potential for wealth and job creation through the generation and exploitation of intellectual property ’ (Department of Culture, Media and Sports, 1998)
  3. 3. 1. Rise of CreativityInformation and Knowledge economyInnovation and competitivenessEmphasis on bending rules, operating atedges, being intuitive.Exemplary role of artist (and scientist)
  4. 4. 2. Artists/ Entrepreneurs• Joseph Schumpeter: development through entrepreneurs not ‘organisation men’• Entrepreneurs are rebels: Creative destruction• Modern Art also about ‘creative destruction’• Entrepreneurs and Artists both creative rebels
  5. 5. 3. Cultural EconomyEmployment and wealth generation as culturalconsumption increasesCultural or symbolic dimension of functionalgoods and services
  6. 6. Aesthetisisation of Everyday Life
  7. 7. Cultural Economy• Post-fordism – niche, ‘just in time’, flexible specialisation• New consumption-led economy of niche and difference and rapid feed-back loops• Creative industries specialise in the skills and difficult business models these imply
  8. 8. Creative IndustriesCreative industry skills at a premiumFrom Artisanal hangover to ‘cutting edge’ of neweconomy‘Creativity’ emerged as key value in ‘positiveliberalism’ – active intervention to ensurecompetitiveness and innovation
  9. 9. Specific Value?• Symbolic• Expressive• Attention• Experience• Cultural? They clearly draw on art and culture, yet deny the histories and specific understandings which come with these.
  10. 10. Culture and artKey concepts in cultural and creativeindustries policies yet remain in suspendedanimation.
  11. 11. CultureAnthropological: shared meanings, practicesof everyday life, beliefs, “culture is ordinary”This challenged by modernity – deeplyconflicted, no longer tied to tradition andsocial rites.
  12. 12. Aesthetic art• Aesthetics 18th century – divided modernity• Distinct realm of experience and knowledge different from that of economic and administrative reason.• Modernist Aesthetics – fuzzy lines between art and life (Ranciere) (Artistic critique of capitalism)• Art as dysfunctional and disruptive• Still living with these contradictions and conflicts
  13. 13. Popular CultureThis applies not just to art but to ‘popular culture’These intertwined and infinitely complicated theanthropological notion of culture and communityDisruptive dimensions of art and popular culture.Both make their integration within the ‘creativeeconomy’ problematic.
  14. 14. Value and ValuesIf cultural then these products have a specifichistory and set of values – for producers,consumers and for citizens.They cannot be reduced to economic valueOnly partially normative: economic valuederived from cultural value.
  15. 15. Cultural IndustriesBut they are clearly economies and they havereal economic effects and impact.Any democratic cultural policy has to takecognisance of this.How to hold economic and cultural together,and within particular places.
  16. 16. Creative Cities• Cities as a crucial horizon for collective identification: complex and conflicted communities.• ‘Creative city’ : from art and cultural industries as urban regeneration.• Reject Fordist planning as a way out of the impasse caused by the very redundancy of Fordist industry in these cities.• Like CIs it was a solution to a problem and also a good thing
  17. 17. Creative Economy and Connected CommunitiesVibrancy, Prosperity, Sustainability, Resilience, Well-beingHow do the creative industries contribute to this?Some real problems.
  18. 18. 1. Language of economics displaces culture• Ignores the idea that a culture economy is also about culture!• Overrides care for the socio-cultural dimension of ‘creative cities’• Ignores the socio-cultural context of markets• Picking winners: Digital and media; fast growth not ‘lifestyle’• Application of ‘business models’ derived from the maximisation of profit.
  19. 19. 2. PropertyMain winners from the growth of arts and creativeindustries – property developers.Property prices go up quicker than company growthDisplaces and excludes the arts/ creative industriesCreating real stress for cultural economies
  20. 20. 3. Consumption and Branding• Consumption drives out production as large retail and other organisations take advantage of new image of an area.• Takes regeneration benefits out of the area• Use of “regenerated” areas to brand the city becomes unjust: whose culture, whose city?
  21. 21. 4. Creative Labour• Huge gap between rhetoric and reality of ‘creative work’• Persistent low pay and (self) exploitation• Unequal access (class, gender, ethnicity)• Uneven geographical spread• Division of Knowledge work and manual work• Inequalities of the service economy• New International Division of Cultural Labour
  22. 22. Creative Economy and Disconnected CommunitiesIn these ways Cis contribute to fragmentation andexclusion, from city spaces, from culturalparticipation, from making a livingHatherley: “A Guide to the New Ruins of GreatBritain”Unsustainable socio-cultural economies
  23. 23. SustainabilityModernism, Capitalism and endless consumptionIncreased turnover of cultural forms and productsAesthetisisation: massive increase in consumption of ‘uselessobjects’.CIs part of the problem…..
  24. 24. 1. Re-thinking Terms
  25. 25. Creativity as hierarchy
  26. 26. Cultural Industries ArtDesign Media
  27. 27. Services PR, Marketing Architecture Design Advertising Post-production, facilities Web/mobile development Photography TV & radio production Games development Contract publishing Heritage & tourism Agents services Experi Exhibitions, attractions (design & build) Online/mobile services encesContent Publishing TV/radio broadcast/distribution Games publishers Cinemas Film studios/distribution Live music Recorded music Performing arts Merchandise Designer fashion Spectator sports Visitor attractions Galleries Antiques Museums Designer-making Heritage Crafts Visual arts Originals
  28. 28. 2. Specifics of PlacePath dependency and evolutionary economicsHistories: of governance; industries and skills;families, colleagues and friends; beliefs andcultures; ‘structures of feeling’.
  29. 29. Soft Infrastructure• Embedded forms of memory, learning and collaboration• Communities of practice: ethics, aesthetics, social cohesion• Institutions and ‘scenes’• Memories, aesthetics and histories in the built environment• Unprogrammed and ‘third, spaces
  30. 30. Differentiated ecosystems• Clusters and networks• Different industries (film, music, design…)• Different knowledges: tacit and formal, vertical and horizontal• Different life stages• Virtual and Physical
  31. 31. Cities are ChangingGrowing diversification of spatial use in cities –inner and outer suburbs, small towns, rural areasReconfiguration of use patterns – city as meetingplaceCultural producers migrate to internet andorganise around social network technologiesReconfiguration of physical/ virtual networks incities
  32. 32. Urban ChangeNew levels of digital infrastructure and flowsof information through the cityReconfiguration of the possibilities of urbandesign, planning and citizen interaction withspace and place
  33. 33. Urban GovernanceNew possibilities for dialogue and co-creativemanagement of cultural ecosystemsCultural policy: not just promote culturaleconomy but say something about whatshould be promoted.Value judgment – what are the grounds ofthis?
  34. 34. Imagined Communities• Planning• Collective• Fragmentation of cities – how do we rethink and organise the horizon of the urban as source of collective identification• Urban cultures: producers, consumers, citizens
  35. 35. A New Modernity?

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