Holcombe aimee pub_leadproject

318 views

Published on

Published in: Education, Technology
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
318
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
4
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

  • -What comes to mind when you read the text on this slide and view the picture? (audience responds)
    -In my research, I came across an inspirational and motivational film created by some middle school students. In this film, the students discuss how bored they are with their current learning environment. They share what they like to do such as video games and internet exploration, and how those elements are not integrated into their classroom. They share how we as educators block them from growing in today’s technology-based society. After viewing the film, I was quite humbled... not so much because of the situation as a whole, but instead because I could see the faces of students in my classroom on that film.
    -Just as technology has immensely evolved in just the last ten to twenty years and continues to grow by the moment, so have our classroom students. However, in most settings, these same students are still being taught they way they were twenty years ago.
    -Therefore a problem needing a solution is created. How do we, as today’s educators, provide the necessary tools in teaching today’s learner? (Audience responds)
    -Michael Barbour, professor at Wayne State University and avid virtual school researcher of online learning states, “For students, we need to gain a better understanding of the skills necessary for adolescent learners to be successful in a largely independent, technology-mediated environment—and then figure out ways to provide students with those skills before they are placed in the online learning environments [that they will experience in college and career]. (2009)
    -If it is truly desired to reach and teach today’s digital learner, the education system must first embrace and allow the needed changes (upgrades) to occur.
    -Upgrades could include any level of technology integration, from adding more computer access to creating lessons around the student’s use of technology.
    -Today, however, I want to discuss with you the wonders that K12 virtual (meaning online) schooling can bring to your classroom and your county.
  • -What comes to mind when you read the text on this slide and view the picture? (audience responds)
    -In my research, I came across an inspirational and motivational film created by some middle school students. In this film, the students discuss how bored they are with their current learning environment. They share what they like to do such as video games and internet exploration, and how those elements are not integrated into their classroom. They share how we as educators block them from growing in today’s technology-based society. After viewing the film, I was quite humbled... not so much because of the situation as a whole, but instead because I could see the faces of students in my classroom on that film.
    -Just as technology has immensely evolved in just the last ten to twenty years and continues to grow by the moment, so have our classroom students. However, in most settings, these same students are still being taught they way they were twenty years ago.
    -Therefore a problem needing a solution is created. How do we, as today’s educators, provide the necessary tools in teaching today’s learner? (Audience responds)
    -Michael Barbour, professor at Wayne State University and avid virtual school researcher of online learning states, “For students, we need to gain a better understanding of the skills necessary for adolescent learners to be successful in a largely independent, technology-mediated environment—and then figure out ways to provide students with those skills before they are placed in the online learning environments [that they will experience in college and career]. (2009)
    -If it is truly desired to reach and teach today’s digital learner, the education system must first embrace and allow the needed changes (upgrades) to occur.
    -Upgrades could include any level of technology integration, from adding more computer access to creating lessons around the student’s use of technology.
    -Today, however, I want to discuss with you the wonders that K12 virtual (meaning online) schooling can bring to your classroom and your county.
  • -What comes to mind when you read the text on this slide and view the picture? (audience responds)
    -In my research, I came across an inspirational and motivational film created by some middle school students. In this film, the students discuss how bored they are with their current learning environment. They share what they like to do such as video games and internet exploration, and how those elements are not integrated into their classroom. They share how we as educators block them from growing in today’s technology-based society. After viewing the film, I was quite humbled... not so much because of the situation as a whole, but instead because I could see the faces of students in my classroom on that film.
    -Just as technology has immensely evolved in just the last ten to twenty years and continues to grow by the moment, so have our classroom students. However, in most settings, these same students are still being taught they way they were twenty years ago.
    -Therefore a problem needing a solution is created. How do we, as today’s educators, provide the necessary tools in teaching today’s learner? (Audience responds)
    -Michael Barbour, professor at Wayne State University and avid virtual school researcher of online learning states, “For students, we need to gain a better understanding of the skills necessary for adolescent learners to be successful in a largely independent, technology-mediated environment—and then figure out ways to provide students with those skills before they are placed in the online learning environments [that they will experience in college and career]. (2009)
    -If it is truly desired to reach and teach today’s digital learner, the education system must first embrace and allow the needed changes (upgrades) to occur.
    -Upgrades could include any level of technology integration, from adding more computer access to creating lessons around the student’s use of technology.
    -Today, however, I want to discuss with you the wonders that K12 virtual (meaning online) schooling can bring to your classroom and your county.
  • -There are many more widely-believed myths than those that you see on this screen; but for the sake of this presentation, I am going to focus on these.
    -Research disagrees with the first bullet quite strongly: In 2009, Michael Barbour found that, “In almost all of the available literature on student performance, students enrolled in virtual school courses do as well or better than their classroom counterparts.” Then his comments are further validated by the US Department of Education, who conducted an extensive study of K12 virtual schooling. Their “meta-analysis found that, on average, students in online learning conditions performed better than those receiving face-to-face instruction.”
    -Perhaps it is that they are simply bored and unengaged in their classrooms. With an online learning option: students can move at their own pace and not have to wait for their peers to catch up, not be distracted by scheduling and disciplinary issues, and not be constrained to learning within their school building.
    -I have found that it would be a great deception for one to perceive that virtual schooling was lacking in the area of formative (and summative) student assessment, and in interactivity with the teacher and peers. In truth, it could be determined that a virtual platform for instruction might even be more successful than that of the traditional classroom. In the traditional classroom, the teacher faces constant schedule, classroom, and behavior management hurdles that unfortunately take away from the learning time and motivation of the students effected. In a well-created virtual classroom, students can not interrupt as only one person can speak at a time. There is a feature where the student raises his/ her hand, is acknowledged by the teacher, and then presses a button to talk. It is a controlled audio conversation and classroom wide discussion. Instant feedback is also featured. Teachers can post brief surveys and/ or quizzes on the platform and students can immediately respond. The computer generates the ‘grades’ and trends instantaneously and the teacher can remediate or enrich as needed within the same class period, instead of having to take the time to grade and revisit the content on another day after the teachable moment has passed. Furthermore, blogs and instant messaging create a wonderful tool for corporate discussion and can even facilitate group project collaboration.
    -Virtual schools are popping up everywhere! “In the United States, there are more than 500,000 enrollments in online courses in grades K-12 and more than one-third of public school districts offer eLearning.” (NACOL, 2006) That number has gotten much larger in the four years since the data was taken; and today, almost every state has developed a K12 e-learning option for either course recovery, full schooling, or both!
    -We are all aware of the major budget cuts to education lately. With furloughs, shortening of school days, raised teacher-student ratios, and staff allotments cut we’d be crazy not to see that the quality education of our students is ultimately what is being sliced. Then when we add in the elements faced recently of natural disaster, weather delay, and pandemic illness outbreaks causing extensive absences- the situation becomes more intense. If, however, students were able to access their learning from anywhere at any time, then these barriers would cease to deter their education. It is up to us to ensure that no future be left behind!
    -Anyone who says they can’t is right! However, with the resources available to us today, we can all indeed create interactive virtual learning that will prepare our students for their futures and ensure learning beyond our classroom walls.
  • -There are many more widely-believed myths than those that you see on this screen; but for the sake of this presentation, I am going to focus on these.
    -Research disagrees with the first bullet quite strongly: In 2009, Michael Barbour found that, “In almost all of the available literature on student performance, students enrolled in virtual school courses do as well or better than their classroom counterparts.” Then his comments are further validated by the US Department of Education, who conducted an extensive study of K12 virtual schooling. Their “meta-analysis found that, on average, students in online learning conditions performed better than those receiving face-to-face instruction.”
    -Perhaps it is that they are simply bored and unengaged in their classrooms. With an online learning option: students can move at their own pace and not have to wait for their peers to catch up, not be distracted by scheduling and disciplinary issues, and not be constrained to learning within their school building.
    -I have found that it would be a great deception for one to perceive that virtual schooling was lacking in the area of formative (and summative) student assessment, and in interactivity with the teacher and peers. In truth, it could be determined that a virtual platform for instruction might even be more successful than that of the traditional classroom. In the traditional classroom, the teacher faces constant schedule, classroom, and behavior management hurdles that unfortunately take away from the learning time and motivation of the students effected. In a well-created virtual classroom, students can not interrupt as only one person can speak at a time. There is a feature where the student raises his/ her hand, is acknowledged by the teacher, and then presses a button to talk. It is a controlled audio conversation and classroom wide discussion. Instant feedback is also featured. Teachers can post brief surveys and/ or quizzes on the platform and students can immediately respond. The computer generates the ‘grades’ and trends instantaneously and the teacher can remediate or enrich as needed within the same class period, instead of having to take the time to grade and revisit the content on another day after the teachable moment has passed. Furthermore, blogs and instant messaging create a wonderful tool for corporate discussion and can even facilitate group project collaboration.
    -Virtual schools are popping up everywhere! “In the United States, there are more than 500,000 enrollments in online courses in grades K-12 and more than one-third of public school districts offer eLearning.” (NACOL, 2006) That number has gotten much larger in the four years since the data was taken; and today, almost every state has developed a K12 e-learning option for either course recovery, full schooling, or both!
    -We are all aware of the major budget cuts to education lately. With furloughs, shortening of school days, raised teacher-student ratios, and staff allotments cut we’d be crazy not to see that the quality education of our students is ultimately what is being sliced. Then when we add in the elements faced recently of natural disaster, weather delay, and pandemic illness outbreaks causing extensive absences- the situation becomes more intense. If, however, students were able to access their learning from anywhere at any time, then these barriers would cease to deter their education. It is up to us to ensure that no future be left behind!
    -Anyone who says they can’t is right! However, with the resources available to us today, we can all indeed create interactive virtual learning that will prepare our students for their futures and ensure learning beyond our classroom walls.
  • -There are many more widely-believed myths than those that you see on this screen; but for the sake of this presentation, I am going to focus on these.
    -Research disagrees with the first bullet quite strongly: In 2009, Michael Barbour found that, “In almost all of the available literature on student performance, students enrolled in virtual school courses do as well or better than their classroom counterparts.” Then his comments are further validated by the US Department of Education, who conducted an extensive study of K12 virtual schooling. Their “meta-analysis found that, on average, students in online learning conditions performed better than those receiving face-to-face instruction.”
    -Perhaps it is that they are simply bored and unengaged in their classrooms. With an online learning option: students can move at their own pace and not have to wait for their peers to catch up, not be distracted by scheduling and disciplinary issues, and not be constrained to learning within their school building.
    -I have found that it would be a great deception for one to perceive that virtual schooling was lacking in the area of formative (and summative) student assessment, and in interactivity with the teacher and peers. In truth, it could be determined that a virtual platform for instruction might even be more successful than that of the traditional classroom. In the traditional classroom, the teacher faces constant schedule, classroom, and behavior management hurdles that unfortunately take away from the learning time and motivation of the students effected. In a well-created virtual classroom, students can not interrupt as only one person can speak at a time. There is a feature where the student raises his/ her hand, is acknowledged by the teacher, and then presses a button to talk. It is a controlled audio conversation and classroom wide discussion. Instant feedback is also featured. Teachers can post brief surveys and/ or quizzes on the platform and students can immediately respond. The computer generates the ‘grades’ and trends instantaneously and the teacher can remediate or enrich as needed within the same class period, instead of having to take the time to grade and revisit the content on another day after the teachable moment has passed. Furthermore, blogs and instant messaging create a wonderful tool for corporate discussion and can even facilitate group project collaboration.
    -Virtual schools are popping up everywhere! “In the United States, there are more than 500,000 enrollments in online courses in grades K-12 and more than one-third of public school districts offer eLearning.” (NACOL, 2006) That number has gotten much larger in the four years since the data was taken; and today, almost every state has developed a K12 e-learning option for either course recovery, full schooling, or both!
    -We are all aware of the major budget cuts to education lately. With furloughs, shortening of school days, raised teacher-student ratios, and staff allotments cut we’d be crazy not to see that the quality education of our students is ultimately what is being sliced. Then when we add in the elements faced recently of natural disaster, weather delay, and pandemic illness outbreaks causing extensive absences- the situation becomes more intense. If, however, students were able to access their learning from anywhere at any time, then these barriers would cease to deter their education. It is up to us to ensure that no future be left behind!
    -Anyone who says they can’t is right! However, with the resources available to us today, we can all indeed create interactive virtual learning that will prepare our students for their futures and ensure learning beyond our classroom walls.
  • -There are many more widely-believed myths than those that you see on this screen; but for the sake of this presentation, I am going to focus on these.
    -Research disagrees with the first bullet quite strongly: In 2009, Michael Barbour found that, “In almost all of the available literature on student performance, students enrolled in virtual school courses do as well or better than their classroom counterparts.” Then his comments are further validated by the US Department of Education, who conducted an extensive study of K12 virtual schooling. Their “meta-analysis found that, on average, students in online learning conditions performed better than those receiving face-to-face instruction.”
    -Perhaps it is that they are simply bored and unengaged in their classrooms. With an online learning option: students can move at their own pace and not have to wait for their peers to catch up, not be distracted by scheduling and disciplinary issues, and not be constrained to learning within their school building.
    -I have found that it would be a great deception for one to perceive that virtual schooling was lacking in the area of formative (and summative) student assessment, and in interactivity with the teacher and peers. In truth, it could be determined that a virtual platform for instruction might even be more successful than that of the traditional classroom. In the traditional classroom, the teacher faces constant schedule, classroom, and behavior management hurdles that unfortunately take away from the learning time and motivation of the students effected. In a well-created virtual classroom, students can not interrupt as only one person can speak at a time. There is a feature where the student raises his/ her hand, is acknowledged by the teacher, and then presses a button to talk. It is a controlled audio conversation and classroom wide discussion. Instant feedback is also featured. Teachers can post brief surveys and/ or quizzes on the platform and students can immediately respond. The computer generates the ‘grades’ and trends instantaneously and the teacher can remediate or enrich as needed within the same class period, instead of having to take the time to grade and revisit the content on another day after the teachable moment has passed. Furthermore, blogs and instant messaging create a wonderful tool for corporate discussion and can even facilitate group project collaboration.
    -Virtual schools are popping up everywhere! “In the United States, there are more than 500,000 enrollments in online courses in grades K-12 and more than one-third of public school districts offer eLearning.” (NACOL, 2006) That number has gotten much larger in the four years since the data was taken; and today, almost every state has developed a K12 e-learning option for either course recovery, full schooling, or both!
    -We are all aware of the major budget cuts to education lately. With furloughs, shortening of school days, raised teacher-student ratios, and staff allotments cut we’d be crazy not to see that the quality education of our students is ultimately what is being sliced. Then when we add in the elements faced recently of natural disaster, weather delay, and pandemic illness outbreaks causing extensive absences- the situation becomes more intense. If, however, students were able to access their learning from anywhere at any time, then these barriers would cease to deter their education. It is up to us to ensure that no future be left behind!
    -Anyone who says they can’t is right! However, with the resources available to us today, we can all indeed create interactive virtual learning that will prepare our students for their futures and ensure learning beyond our classroom walls.
  • -There are many more widely-believed myths than those that you see on this screen; but for the sake of this presentation, I am going to focus on these.
    -Research disagrees with the first bullet quite strongly: In 2009, Michael Barbour found that, “In almost all of the available literature on student performance, students enrolled in virtual school courses do as well or better than their classroom counterparts.” Then his comments are further validated by the US Department of Education, who conducted an extensive study of K12 virtual schooling. Their “meta-analysis found that, on average, students in online learning conditions performed better than those receiving face-to-face instruction.”
    -Perhaps it is that they are simply bored and unengaged in their classrooms. With an online learning option: students can move at their own pace and not have to wait for their peers to catch up, not be distracted by scheduling and disciplinary issues, and not be constrained to learning within their school building.
    -I have found that it would be a great deception for one to perceive that virtual schooling was lacking in the area of formative (and summative) student assessment, and in interactivity with the teacher and peers. In truth, it could be determined that a virtual platform for instruction might even be more successful than that of the traditional classroom. In the traditional classroom, the teacher faces constant schedule, classroom, and behavior management hurdles that unfortunately take away from the learning time and motivation of the students effected. In a well-created virtual classroom, students can not interrupt as only one person can speak at a time. There is a feature where the student raises his/ her hand, is acknowledged by the teacher, and then presses a button to talk. It is a controlled audio conversation and classroom wide discussion. Instant feedback is also featured. Teachers can post brief surveys and/ or quizzes on the platform and students can immediately respond. The computer generates the ‘grades’ and trends instantaneously and the teacher can remediate or enrich as needed within the same class period, instead of having to take the time to grade and revisit the content on another day after the teachable moment has passed. Furthermore, blogs and instant messaging create a wonderful tool for corporate discussion and can even facilitate group project collaboration.
    -Virtual schools are popping up everywhere! “In the United States, there are more than 500,000 enrollments in online courses in grades K-12 and more than one-third of public school districts offer eLearning.” (NACOL, 2006) That number has gotten much larger in the four years since the data was taken; and today, almost every state has developed a K12 e-learning option for either course recovery, full schooling, or both!
    -We are all aware of the major budget cuts to education lately. With furloughs, shortening of school days, raised teacher-student ratios, and staff allotments cut we’d be crazy not to see that the quality education of our students is ultimately what is being sliced. Then when we add in the elements faced recently of natural disaster, weather delay, and pandemic illness outbreaks causing extensive absences- the situation becomes more intense. If, however, students were able to access their learning from anywhere at any time, then these barriers would cease to deter their education. It is up to us to ensure that no future be left behind!
    -Anyone who says they can’t is right! However, with the resources available to us today, we can all indeed create interactive virtual learning that will prepare our students for their futures and ensure learning beyond our classroom walls.
  • -There are many more widely-believed myths than those that you see on this screen; but for the sake of this presentation, I am going to focus on these.
    -Research disagrees with the first bullet quite strongly: In 2009, Michael Barbour found that, “In almost all of the available literature on student performance, students enrolled in virtual school courses do as well or better than their classroom counterparts.” Then his comments are further validated by the US Department of Education, who conducted an extensive study of K12 virtual schooling. Their “meta-analysis found that, on average, students in online learning conditions performed better than those receiving face-to-face instruction.”
    -Perhaps it is that they are simply bored and unengaged in their classrooms. With an online learning option: students can move at their own pace and not have to wait for their peers to catch up, not be distracted by scheduling and disciplinary issues, and not be constrained to learning within their school building.
    -I have found that it would be a great deception for one to perceive that virtual schooling was lacking in the area of formative (and summative) student assessment, and in interactivity with the teacher and peers. In truth, it could be determined that a virtual platform for instruction might even be more successful than that of the traditional classroom. In the traditional classroom, the teacher faces constant schedule, classroom, and behavior management hurdles that unfortunately take away from the learning time and motivation of the students effected. In a well-created virtual classroom, students can not interrupt as only one person can speak at a time. There is a feature where the student raises his/ her hand, is acknowledged by the teacher, and then presses a button to talk. It is a controlled audio conversation and classroom wide discussion. Instant feedback is also featured. Teachers can post brief surveys and/ or quizzes on the platform and students can immediately respond. The computer generates the ‘grades’ and trends instantaneously and the teacher can remediate or enrich as needed within the same class period, instead of having to take the time to grade and revisit the content on another day after the teachable moment has passed. Furthermore, blogs and instant messaging create a wonderful tool for corporate discussion and can even facilitate group project collaboration.
    -Virtual schools are popping up everywhere! “In the United States, there are more than 500,000 enrollments in online courses in grades K-12 and more than one-third of public school districts offer eLearning.” (NACOL, 2006) That number has gotten much larger in the four years since the data was taken; and today, almost every state has developed a K12 e-learning option for either course recovery, full schooling, or both!
    -We are all aware of the major budget cuts to education lately. With furloughs, shortening of school days, raised teacher-student ratios, and staff allotments cut we’d be crazy not to see that the quality education of our students is ultimately what is being sliced. Then when we add in the elements faced recently of natural disaster, weather delay, and pandemic illness outbreaks causing extensive absences- the situation becomes more intense. If, however, students were able to access their learning from anywhere at any time, then these barriers would cease to deter their education. It is up to us to ensure that no future be left behind!
    -Anyone who says they can’t is right! However, with the resources available to us today, we can all indeed create interactive virtual learning that will prepare our students for their futures and ensure learning beyond our classroom walls.
  • -There are many more widely-believed myths than those that you see on this screen; but for the sake of this presentation, I am going to focus on these.
    -Research disagrees with the first bullet quite strongly: In 2009, Michael Barbour found that, “In almost all of the available literature on student performance, students enrolled in virtual school courses do as well or better than their classroom counterparts.” Then his comments are further validated by the US Department of Education, who conducted an extensive study of K12 virtual schooling. Their “meta-analysis found that, on average, students in online learning conditions performed better than those receiving face-to-face instruction.”
    -Perhaps it is that they are simply bored and unengaged in their classrooms. With an online learning option: students can move at their own pace and not have to wait for their peers to catch up, not be distracted by scheduling and disciplinary issues, and not be constrained to learning within their school building.
    -I have found that it would be a great deception for one to perceive that virtual schooling was lacking in the area of formative (and summative) student assessment, and in interactivity with the teacher and peers. In truth, it could be determined that a virtual platform for instruction might even be more successful than that of the traditional classroom. In the traditional classroom, the teacher faces constant schedule, classroom, and behavior management hurdles that unfortunately take away from the learning time and motivation of the students effected. In a well-created virtual classroom, students can not interrupt as only one person can speak at a time. There is a feature where the student raises his/ her hand, is acknowledged by the teacher, and then presses a button to talk. It is a controlled audio conversation and classroom wide discussion. Instant feedback is also featured. Teachers can post brief surveys and/ or quizzes on the platform and students can immediately respond. The computer generates the ‘grades’ and trends instantaneously and the teacher can remediate or enrich as needed within the same class period, instead of having to take the time to grade and revisit the content on another day after the teachable moment has passed. Furthermore, blogs and instant messaging create a wonderful tool for corporate discussion and can even facilitate group project collaboration.
    -Virtual schools are popping up everywhere! “In the United States, there are more than 500,000 enrollments in online courses in grades K-12 and more than one-third of public school districts offer eLearning.” (NACOL, 2006) That number has gotten much larger in the four years since the data was taken; and today, almost every state has developed a K12 e-learning option for either course recovery, full schooling, or both!
    -We are all aware of the major budget cuts to education lately. With furloughs, shortening of school days, raised teacher-student ratios, and staff allotments cut we’d be crazy not to see that the quality education of our students is ultimately what is being sliced. Then when we add in the elements faced recently of natural disaster, weather delay, and pandemic illness outbreaks causing extensive absences- the situation becomes more intense. If, however, students were able to access their learning from anywhere at any time, then these barriers would cease to deter their education. It is up to us to ensure that no future be left behind!
    -Anyone who says they can’t is right! However, with the resources available to us today, we can all indeed create interactive virtual learning that will prepare our students for their futures and ensure learning beyond our classroom walls.
  • -There are many more widely-believed myths than those that you see on this screen; but for the sake of this presentation, I am going to focus on these.
    -Research disagrees with the first bullet quite strongly: In 2009, Michael Barbour found that, “In almost all of the available literature on student performance, students enrolled in virtual school courses do as well or better than their classroom counterparts.” Then his comments are further validated by the US Department of Education, who conducted an extensive study of K12 virtual schooling. Their “meta-analysis found that, on average, students in online learning conditions performed better than those receiving face-to-face instruction.”
    -Perhaps it is that they are simply bored and unengaged in their classrooms. With an online learning option: students can move at their own pace and not have to wait for their peers to catch up, not be distracted by scheduling and disciplinary issues, and not be constrained to learning within their school building.
    -I have found that it would be a great deception for one to perceive that virtual schooling was lacking in the area of formative (and summative) student assessment, and in interactivity with the teacher and peers. In truth, it could be determined that a virtual platform for instruction might even be more successful than that of the traditional classroom. In the traditional classroom, the teacher faces constant schedule, classroom, and behavior management hurdles that unfortunately take away from the learning time and motivation of the students effected. In a well-created virtual classroom, students can not interrupt as only one person can speak at a time. There is a feature where the student raises his/ her hand, is acknowledged by the teacher, and then presses a button to talk. It is a controlled audio conversation and classroom wide discussion. Instant feedback is also featured. Teachers can post brief surveys and/ or quizzes on the platform and students can immediately respond. The computer generates the ‘grades’ and trends instantaneously and the teacher can remediate or enrich as needed within the same class period, instead of having to take the time to grade and revisit the content on another day after the teachable moment has passed. Furthermore, blogs and instant messaging create a wonderful tool for corporate discussion and can even facilitate group project collaboration.
    -Virtual schools are popping up everywhere! “In the United States, there are more than 500,000 enrollments in online courses in grades K-12 and more than one-third of public school districts offer eLearning.” (NACOL, 2006) That number has gotten much larger in the four years since the data was taken; and today, almost every state has developed a K12 e-learning option for either course recovery, full schooling, or both!
    -We are all aware of the major budget cuts to education lately. With furloughs, shortening of school days, raised teacher-student ratios, and staff allotments cut we’d be crazy not to see that the quality education of our students is ultimately what is being sliced. Then when we add in the elements faced recently of natural disaster, weather delay, and pandemic illness outbreaks causing extensive absences- the situation becomes more intense. If, however, students were able to access their learning from anywhere at any time, then these barriers would cease to deter their education. It is up to us to ensure that no future be left behind!
    -Anyone who says they can’t is right! However, with the resources available to us today, we can all indeed create interactive virtual learning that will prepare our students for their futures and ensure learning beyond our classroom walls.
  • -Teacher/ School Websites are prevalent in most school systems, but not all are able to withstand interactivity and media rich files. Simply using a website for posting homework and assignments is very limiting, and truthfully boring to your students. It is important that your website include: blogs for student postings, resources with URLs for further study, linked access to the library and other necessary learning databases, links to gaming platforms (I highly suggest Quest Atlantis, and teen Secondlife is good too.), capability for student publications (students put in much more care when presenting before their peers), photo galleries for digital storytelling, a capacity for posting and viewing short films... the list is endless! If your school system’s platform is not feasible for these elements, I suggest that you either pay a nominal fee for a site domain yourself, or create a Ning or Wiki site. Ning allows you all of these elements as well as members-only access (which is great for keeping your class together and protected from outsiders).
    -Be knowledgeable by joining Ning in Education, Edutopia, and iNACOL to stay up to date on the world of K12 virtual learning and to be in touch with teachers implementing it every day. These 3 perfessonal journals and educator hubs possess a world of knowledge and tips for educators looking to enhance their learning with media.
    -There is definitely something to be said about the power of healthy competition, after all it is the very platform that most corporations thrive off of to keep our economy running. Our students must learn to be academically competitive with praise in a healthy educational way. This can be facilitated through the plethora of online academic contests available.
    -I once taught a small class of very low and unmotivated writers. After having given them the skills that they needed to win, I encouraged them all to participate in a local writing contest. They thought I was crazy! Never the less, I continued to encourage them and reminded them often of the possibilities of success. All but 1 ended up entering a piece of writing. When the results came, every one of those students was awarded a certificate, and all of the top 3 finalists were from that group! Now, I encourage student participation in every competition that I find that relates to my subject matter. I have found that, because of competing, they put more effort into all of their assignments and presentations and they work harder to understand the content. Other wonderful lessons provided through competitions, are those of civic participation and community involvement. Students no longer see themselves as a kid without connections; instead they feel empowered as contributors in their society and world!
    - A wise retired teacher once said to me, “You can’t expect your students to do what you aren’t doing ourselves!”
    -Perhaps this is the core of why education is not progressive in comparison to our technology-based society… too many teachers teach the way they were taught because they fear the unknown of learning something new!
    -I challenge you to explore the world of Web 2.0 technology and implement it into your teaching. There is a program entitled Udutu that offers a free trial. In this program, you can easily create web-based lessons from scratch and publish them for world-wide access and data collection through Facebook’s UdutuLearn and UdutuTeach. (Show my example lesson on the bill of rights.)
    -Zoho is a fabulous free collaboration and networking tool for creating group projects, presentations, documents…etc. Just about anything your students would create on a school’s computer, can be made in Zoho. One of my biggest peeves is when students are working as a group and Little Johnny forgot the disk or Sally has the flu and can’t work with her group. These problems are both eliminated in that Zoho is completely online and contributors can work on it from anywhere at any time without hindrance.
    -Besides these 2 specific programs, your instruction can be engaging by giving your students media projects to create.
    -Podcasts are wonderful for Literature lessons. (Share my podcast drama lesson- radio show.)
    -Creation of websites and webquests allow students to teach others, thus reach the highest level of learning.
    -I bet if you pooled your students as to who has created a video on youtube or watched one, you’d have 100% of the hands go up. Students love to be on film and they love to create films. Taking an element that they love and making it educational makes their learning engaging and fun.
    -Finally, just use the plethora of resources available to you all of the time in your classroom, whether it be a virtual school or in a standard school building. If you are using it frequently, your students will become knowledgeable of it and want to learn to be able to use it too. Many of my students knew nothing of podcasts before I introduced them, now they are active subscribers to many educational podcasts!
    -If you want an interactive classroom that is up to date with the real world education needed, then you need to be creating opportunity for yourself, your colleagues, and your students at every turn!


  • -Teacher/ School Websites are prevalent in most school systems, but not all are able to withstand interactivity and media rich files. Simply using a website for posting homework and assignments is very limiting, and truthfully boring to your students. It is important that your website include: blogs for student postings, resources with URLs for further study, linked access to the library and other necessary learning databases, links to gaming platforms (I highly suggest Quest Atlantis, and teen Secondlife is good too.), capability for student publications (students put in much more care when presenting before their peers), photo galleries for digital storytelling, a capacity for posting and viewing short films... the list is endless! If your school system’s platform is not feasible for these elements, I suggest that you either pay a nominal fee for a site domain yourself, or create a Ning or Wiki site. Ning allows you all of these elements as well as members-only access (which is great for keeping your class together and protected from outsiders).
    -Be knowledgeable by joining Ning in Education, Edutopia, and iNACOL to stay up to date on the world of K12 virtual learning and to be in touch with teachers implementing it every day. These 3 perfessonal journals and educator hubs possess a world of knowledge and tips for educators looking to enhance their learning with media.
    -There is definitely something to be said about the power of healthy competition, after all it is the very platform that most corporations thrive off of to keep our economy running. Our students must learn to be academically competitive with praise in a healthy educational way. This can be facilitated through the plethora of online academic contests available.
    -I once taught a small class of very low and unmotivated writers. After having given them the skills that they needed to win, I encouraged them all to participate in a local writing contest. They thought I was crazy! Never the less, I continued to encourage them and reminded them often of the possibilities of success. All but 1 ended up entering a piece of writing. When the results came, every one of those students was awarded a certificate, and all of the top 3 finalists were from that group! Now, I encourage student participation in every competition that I find that relates to my subject matter. I have found that, because of competing, they put more effort into all of their assignments and presentations and they work harder to understand the content. Other wonderful lessons provided through competitions, are those of civic participation and community involvement. Students no longer see themselves as a kid without connections; instead they feel empowered as contributors in their society and world!
    - A wise retired teacher once said to me, “You can’t expect your students to do what you aren’t doing ourselves!”
    -Perhaps this is the core of why education is not progressive in comparison to our technology-based society… too many teachers teach the way they were taught because they fear the unknown of learning something new!
    -I challenge you to explore the world of Web 2.0 technology and implement it into your teaching. There is a program entitled Udutu that offers a free trial. In this program, you can easily create web-based lessons from scratch and publish them for world-wide access and data collection through Facebook’s UdutuLearn and UdutuTeach. (Show my example lesson on the bill of rights.)
    -Zoho is a fabulous free collaboration and networking tool for creating group projects, presentations, documents…etc. Just about anything your students would create on a school’s computer, can be made in Zoho. One of my biggest peeves is when students are working as a group and Little Johnny forgot the disk or Sally has the flu and can’t work with her group. These problems are both eliminated in that Zoho is completely online and contributors can work on it from anywhere at any time without hindrance.
    -Besides these 2 specific programs, your instruction can be engaging by giving your students media projects to create.
    -Podcasts are wonderful for Literature lessons. (Share my podcast drama lesson- radio show.)
    -Creation of websites and webquests allow students to teach others, thus reach the highest level of learning.
    -I bet if you pooled your students as to who has created a video on youtube or watched one, you’d have 100% of the hands go up. Students love to be on film and they love to create films. Taking an element that they love and making it educational makes their learning engaging and fun.
    -Finally, just use the plethora of resources available to you all of the time in your classroom, whether it be a virtual school or in a standard school building. If you are using it frequently, your students will become knowledgeable of it and want to learn to be able to use it too. Many of my students knew nothing of podcasts before I introduced them, now they are active subscribers to many educational podcasts!
    -If you want an interactive classroom that is up to date with the real world education needed, then you need to be creating opportunity for yourself, your colleagues, and your students at every turn!


  • -Teacher/ School Websites are prevalent in most school systems, but not all are able to withstand interactivity and media rich files. Simply using a website for posting homework and assignments is very limiting, and truthfully boring to your students. It is important that your website include: blogs for student postings, resources with URLs for further study, linked access to the library and other necessary learning databases, links to gaming platforms (I highly suggest Quest Atlantis, and teen Secondlife is good too.), capability for student publications (students put in much more care when presenting before their peers), photo galleries for digital storytelling, a capacity for posting and viewing short films... the list is endless! If your school system’s platform is not feasible for these elements, I suggest that you either pay a nominal fee for a site domain yourself, or create a Ning or Wiki site. Ning allows you all of these elements as well as members-only access (which is great for keeping your class together and protected from outsiders).
    -Be knowledgeable by joining Ning in Education, Edutopia, and iNACOL to stay up to date on the world of K12 virtual learning and to be in touch with teachers implementing it every day. These 3 perfessonal journals and educator hubs possess a world of knowledge and tips for educators looking to enhance their learning with media.
    -There is definitely something to be said about the power of healthy competition, after all it is the very platform that most corporations thrive off of to keep our economy running. Our students must learn to be academically competitive with praise in a healthy educational way. This can be facilitated through the plethora of online academic contests available.
    -I once taught a small class of very low and unmotivated writers. After having given them the skills that they needed to win, I encouraged them all to participate in a local writing contest. They thought I was crazy! Never the less, I continued to encourage them and reminded them often of the possibilities of success. All but 1 ended up entering a piece of writing. When the results came, every one of those students was awarded a certificate, and all of the top 3 finalists were from that group! Now, I encourage student participation in every competition that I find that relates to my subject matter. I have found that, because of competing, they put more effort into all of their assignments and presentations and they work harder to understand the content. Other wonderful lessons provided through competitions, are those of civic participation and community involvement. Students no longer see themselves as a kid without connections; instead they feel empowered as contributors in their society and world!
    - A wise retired teacher once said to me, “You can’t expect your students to do what you aren’t doing ourselves!”
    -Perhaps this is the core of why education is not progressive in comparison to our technology-based society… too many teachers teach the way they were taught because they fear the unknown of learning something new!
    -I challenge you to explore the world of Web 2.0 technology and implement it into your teaching. There is a program entitled Udutu that offers a free trial. In this program, you can easily create web-based lessons from scratch and publish them for world-wide access and data collection through Facebook’s UdutuLearn and UdutuTeach. (Show my example lesson on the bill of rights.)
    -Zoho is a fabulous free collaboration and networking tool for creating group projects, presentations, documents…etc. Just about anything your students would create on a school’s computer, can be made in Zoho. One of my biggest peeves is when students are working as a group and Little Johnny forgot the disk or Sally has the flu and can’t work with her group. These problems are both eliminated in that Zoho is completely online and contributors can work on it from anywhere at any time without hindrance.
    -Besides these 2 specific programs, your instruction can be engaging by giving your students media projects to create.
    -Podcasts are wonderful for Literature lessons. (Share my podcast drama lesson- radio show.)
    -Creation of websites and webquests allow students to teach others, thus reach the highest level of learning.
    -I bet if you pooled your students as to who has created a video on youtube or watched one, you’d have 100% of the hands go up. Students love to be on film and they love to create films. Taking an element that they love and making it educational makes their learning engaging and fun.
    -Finally, just use the plethora of resources available to you all of the time in your classroom, whether it be a virtual school or in a standard school building. If you are using it frequently, your students will become knowledgeable of it and want to learn to be able to use it too. Many of my students knew nothing of podcasts before I introduced them, now they are active subscribers to many educational podcasts!
    -If you want an interactive classroom that is up to date with the real world education needed, then you need to be creating opportunity for yourself, your colleagues, and your students at every turn!


  • -Teacher/ School Websites are prevalent in most school systems, but not all are able to withstand interactivity and media rich files. Simply using a website for posting homework and assignments is very limiting, and truthfully boring to your students. It is important that your website include: blogs for student postings, resources with URLs for further study, linked access to the library and other necessary learning databases, links to gaming platforms (I highly suggest Quest Atlantis, and teen Secondlife is good too.), capability for student publications (students put in much more care when presenting before their peers), photo galleries for digital storytelling, a capacity for posting and viewing short films... the list is endless! If your school system’s platform is not feasible for these elements, I suggest that you either pay a nominal fee for a site domain yourself, or create a Ning or Wiki site. Ning allows you all of these elements as well as members-only access (which is great for keeping your class together and protected from outsiders).
    -Be knowledgeable by joining Ning in Education, Edutopia, and iNACOL to stay up to date on the world of K12 virtual learning and to be in touch with teachers implementing it every day. These 3 perfessonal journals and educator hubs possess a world of knowledge and tips for educators looking to enhance their learning with media.
    -There is definitely something to be said about the power of healthy competition, after all it is the very platform that most corporations thrive off of to keep our economy running. Our students must learn to be academically competitive with praise in a healthy educational way. This can be facilitated through the plethora of online academic contests available.
    -I once taught a small class of very low and unmotivated writers. After having given them the skills that they needed to win, I encouraged them all to participate in a local writing contest. They thought I was crazy! Never the less, I continued to encourage them and reminded them often of the possibilities of success. All but 1 ended up entering a piece of writing. When the results came, every one of those students was awarded a certificate, and all of the top 3 finalists were from that group! Now, I encourage student participation in every competition that I find that relates to my subject matter. I have found that, because of competing, they put more effort into all of their assignments and presentations and they work harder to understand the content. Other wonderful lessons provided through competitions, are those of civic participation and community involvement. Students no longer see themselves as a kid without connections; instead they feel empowered as contributors in their society and world!
    - A wise retired teacher once said to me, “You can’t expect your students to do what you aren’t doing ourselves!”
    -Perhaps this is the core of why education is not progressive in comparison to our technology-based society… too many teachers teach the way they were taught because they fear the unknown of learning something new!
    -I challenge you to explore the world of Web 2.0 technology and implement it into your teaching. There is a program entitled Udutu that offers a free trial. In this program, you can easily create web-based lessons from scratch and publish them for world-wide access and data collection through Facebook’s UdutuLearn and UdutuTeach. (Show my example lesson on the bill of rights.)
    -Zoho is a fabulous free collaboration and networking tool for creating group projects, presentations, documents…etc. Just about anything your students would create on a school’s computer, can be made in Zoho. One of my biggest peeves is when students are working as a group and Little Johnny forgot the disk or Sally has the flu and can’t work with her group. These problems are both eliminated in that Zoho is completely online and contributors can work on it from anywhere at any time without hindrance.
    -Besides these 2 specific programs, your instruction can be engaging by giving your students media projects to create.
    -Podcasts are wonderful for Literature lessons. (Share my podcast drama lesson- radio show.)
    -Creation of websites and webquests allow students to teach others, thus reach the highest level of learning.
    -I bet if you pooled your students as to who has created a video on youtube or watched one, you’d have 100% of the hands go up. Students love to be on film and they love to create films. Taking an element that they love and making it educational makes their learning engaging and fun.
    -Finally, just use the plethora of resources available to you all of the time in your classroom, whether it be a virtual school or in a standard school building. If you are using it frequently, your students will become knowledgeable of it and want to learn to be able to use it too. Many of my students knew nothing of podcasts before I introduced them, now they are active subscribers to many educational podcasts!
    -If you want an interactive classroom that is up to date with the real world education needed, then you need to be creating opportunity for yourself, your colleagues, and your students at every turn!


  • -Teacher/ School Websites are prevalent in most school systems, but not all are able to withstand interactivity and media rich files. Simply using a website for posting homework and assignments is very limiting, and truthfully boring to your students. It is important that your website include: blogs for student postings, resources with URLs for further study, linked access to the library and other necessary learning databases, links to gaming platforms (I highly suggest Quest Atlantis, and teen Secondlife is good too.), capability for student publications (students put in much more care when presenting before their peers), photo galleries for digital storytelling, a capacity for posting and viewing short films... the list is endless! If your school system’s platform is not feasible for these elements, I suggest that you either pay a nominal fee for a site domain yourself, or create a Ning or Wiki site. Ning allows you all of these elements as well as members-only access (which is great for keeping your class together and protected from outsiders).
    -Be knowledgeable by joining Ning in Education, Edutopia, and iNACOL to stay up to date on the world of K12 virtual learning and to be in touch with teachers implementing it every day. These 3 perfessonal journals and educator hubs possess a world of knowledge and tips for educators looking to enhance their learning with media.
    -There is definitely something to be said about the power of healthy competition, after all it is the very platform that most corporations thrive off of to keep our economy running. Our students must learn to be academically competitive with praise in a healthy educational way. This can be facilitated through the plethora of online academic contests available.
    -I once taught a small class of very low and unmotivated writers. After having given them the skills that they needed to win, I encouraged them all to participate in a local writing contest. They thought I was crazy! Never the less, I continued to encourage them and reminded them often of the possibilities of success. All but 1 ended up entering a piece of writing. When the results came, every one of those students was awarded a certificate, and all of the top 3 finalists were from that group! Now, I encourage student participation in every competition that I find that relates to my subject matter. I have found that, because of competing, they put more effort into all of their assignments and presentations and they work harder to understand the content. Other wonderful lessons provided through competitions, are those of civic participation and community involvement. Students no longer see themselves as a kid without connections; instead they feel empowered as contributors in their society and world!
    - A wise retired teacher once said to me, “You can’t expect your students to do what you aren’t doing ourselves!”
    -Perhaps this is the core of why education is not progressive in comparison to our technology-based society… too many teachers teach the way they were taught because they fear the unknown of learning something new!
    -I challenge you to explore the world of Web 2.0 technology and implement it into your teaching. There is a program entitled Udutu that offers a free trial. In this program, you can easily create web-based lessons from scratch and publish them for world-wide access and data collection through Facebook’s UdutuLearn and UdutuTeach. (Show my example lesson on the bill of rights.)
    -Zoho is a fabulous free collaboration and networking tool for creating group projects, presentations, documents…etc. Just about anything your students would create on a school’s computer, can be made in Zoho. One of my biggest peeves is when students are working as a group and Little Johnny forgot the disk or Sally has the flu and can’t work with her group. These problems are both eliminated in that Zoho is completely online and contributors can work on it from anywhere at any time without hindrance.
    -Besides these 2 specific programs, your instruction can be engaging by giving your students media projects to create.
    -Podcasts are wonderful for Literature lessons. (Share my podcast drama lesson- radio show.)
    -Creation of websites and webquests allow students to teach others, thus reach the highest level of learning.
    -I bet if you pooled your students as to who has created a video on youtube or watched one, you’d have 100% of the hands go up. Students love to be on film and they love to create films. Taking an element that they love and making it educational makes their learning engaging and fun.
    -Finally, just use the plethora of resources available to you all of the time in your classroom, whether it be a virtual school or in a standard school building. If you are using it frequently, your students will become knowledgeable of it and want to learn to be able to use it too. Many of my students knew nothing of podcasts before I introduced them, now they are active subscribers to many educational podcasts!
    -If you want an interactive classroom that is up to date with the real world education needed, then you need to be creating opportunity for yourself, your colleagues, and your students at every turn!


  • -Teacher/ School Websites are prevalent in most school systems, but not all are able to withstand interactivity and media rich files. Simply using a website for posting homework and assignments is very limiting, and truthfully boring to your students. It is important that your website include: blogs for student postings, resources with URLs for further study, linked access to the library and other necessary learning databases, links to gaming platforms (I highly suggest Quest Atlantis, and teen Secondlife is good too.), capability for student publications (students put in much more care when presenting before their peers), photo galleries for digital storytelling, a capacity for posting and viewing short films... the list is endless! If your school system’s platform is not feasible for these elements, I suggest that you either pay a nominal fee for a site domain yourself, or create a Ning or Wiki site. Ning allows you all of these elements as well as members-only access (which is great for keeping your class together and protected from outsiders).
    -Be knowledgeable by joining Ning in Education, Edutopia, and iNACOL to stay up to date on the world of K12 virtual learning and to be in touch with teachers implementing it every day. These 3 perfessonal journals and educator hubs possess a world of knowledge and tips for educators looking to enhance their learning with media.
    -There is definitely something to be said about the power of healthy competition, after all it is the very platform that most corporations thrive off of to keep our economy running. Our students must learn to be academically competitive with praise in a healthy educational way. This can be facilitated through the plethora of online academic contests available.
    -I once taught a small class of very low and unmotivated writers. After having given them the skills that they needed to win, I encouraged them all to participate in a local writing contest. They thought I was crazy! Never the less, I continued to encourage them and reminded them often of the possibilities of success. All but 1 ended up entering a piece of writing. When the results came, every one of those students was awarded a certificate, and all of the top 3 finalists were from that group! Now, I encourage student participation in every competition that I find that relates to my subject matter. I have found that, because of competing, they put more effort into all of their assignments and presentations and they work harder to understand the content. Other wonderful lessons provided through competitions, are those of civic participation and community involvement. Students no longer see themselves as a kid without connections; instead they feel empowered as contributors in their society and world!
    - A wise retired teacher once said to me, “You can’t expect your students to do what you aren’t doing ourselves!”
    -Perhaps this is the core of why education is not progressive in comparison to our technology-based society… too many teachers teach the way they were taught because they fear the unknown of learning something new!
    -I challenge you to explore the world of Web 2.0 technology and implement it into your teaching. There is a program entitled Udutu that offers a free trial. In this program, you can easily create web-based lessons from scratch and publish them for world-wide access and data collection through Facebook’s UdutuLearn and UdutuTeach. (Show my example lesson on the bill of rights.)
    -Zoho is a fabulous free collaboration and networking tool for creating group projects, presentations, documents…etc. Just about anything your students would create on a school’s computer, can be made in Zoho. One of my biggest peeves is when students are working as a group and Little Johnny forgot the disk or Sally has the flu and can’t work with her group. These problems are both eliminated in that Zoho is completely online and contributors can work on it from anywhere at any time without hindrance.
    -Besides these 2 specific programs, your instruction can be engaging by giving your students media projects to create.
    -Podcasts are wonderful for Literature lessons. (Share my podcast drama lesson- radio show.)
    -Creation of websites and webquests allow students to teach others, thus reach the highest level of learning.
    -I bet if you pooled your students as to who has created a video on youtube or watched one, you’d have 100% of the hands go up. Students love to be on film and they love to create films. Taking an element that they love and making it educational makes their learning engaging and fun.
    -Finally, just use the plethora of resources available to you all of the time in your classroom, whether it be a virtual school or in a standard school building. If you are using it frequently, your students will become knowledgeable of it and want to learn to be able to use it too. Many of my students knew nothing of podcasts before I introduced them, now they are active subscribers to many educational podcasts!
    -If you want an interactive classroom that is up to date with the real world education needed, then you need to be creating opportunity for yourself, your colleagues, and your students at every turn!


  • -Teacher/ School Websites are prevalent in most school systems, but not all are able to withstand interactivity and media rich files. Simply using a website for posting homework and assignments is very limiting, and truthfully boring to your students. It is important that your website include: blogs for student postings, resources with URLs for further study, linked access to the library and other necessary learning databases, links to gaming platforms (I highly suggest Quest Atlantis, and teen Secondlife is good too.), capability for student publications (students put in much more care when presenting before their peers), photo galleries for digital storytelling, a capacity for posting and viewing short films... the list is endless! If your school system’s platform is not feasible for these elements, I suggest that you either pay a nominal fee for a site domain yourself, or create a Ning or Wiki site. Ning allows you all of these elements as well as members-only access (which is great for keeping your class together and protected from outsiders).
    -Be knowledgeable by joining Ning in Education, Edutopia, and iNACOL to stay up to date on the world of K12 virtual learning and to be in touch with teachers implementing it every day. These 3 perfessonal journals and educator hubs possess a world of knowledge and tips for educators looking to enhance their learning with media.
    -There is definitely something to be said about the power of healthy competition, after all it is the very platform that most corporations thrive off of to keep our economy running. Our students must learn to be academically competitive with praise in a healthy educational way. This can be facilitated through the plethora of online academic contests available.
    -I once taught a small class of very low and unmotivated writers. After having given them the skills that they needed to win, I encouraged them all to participate in a local writing contest. They thought I was crazy! Never the less, I continued to encourage them and reminded them often of the possibilities of success. All but 1 ended up entering a piece of writing. When the results came, every one of those students was awarded a certificate, and all of the top 3 finalists were from that group! Now, I encourage student participation in every competition that I find that relates to my subject matter. I have found that, because of competing, they put more effort into all of their assignments and presentations and they work harder to understand the content. Other wonderful lessons provided through competitions, are those of civic participation and community involvement. Students no longer see themselves as a kid without connections; instead they feel empowered as contributors in their society and world!
    - A wise retired teacher once said to me, “You can’t expect your students to do what you aren’t doing ourselves!”
    -Perhaps this is the core of why education is not progressive in comparison to our technology-based society… too many teachers teach the way they were taught because they fear the unknown of learning something new!
    -I challenge you to explore the world of Web 2.0 technology and implement it into your teaching. There is a program entitled Udutu that offers a free trial. In this program, you can easily create web-based lessons from scratch and publish them for world-wide access and data collection through Facebook’s UdutuLearn and UdutuTeach. (Show my example lesson on the bill of rights.)
    -Zoho is a fabulous free collaboration and networking tool for creating group projects, presentations, documents…etc. Just about anything your students would create on a school’s computer, can be made in Zoho. One of my biggest peeves is when students are working as a group and Little Johnny forgot the disk or Sally has the flu and can’t work with her group. These problems are both eliminated in that Zoho is completely online and contributors can work on it from anywhere at any time without hindrance.
    -Besides these 2 specific programs, your instruction can be engaging by giving your students media projects to create.
    -Podcasts are wonderful for Literature lessons. (Share my podcast drama lesson- radio show.)
    -Creation of websites and webquests allow students to teach others, thus reach the highest level of learning.
    -I bet if you pooled your students as to who has created a video on youtube or watched one, you’d have 100% of the hands go up. Students love to be on film and they love to create films. Taking an element that they love and making it educational makes their learning engaging and fun.
    -Finally, just use the plethora of resources available to you all of the time in your classroom, whether it be a virtual school or in a standard school building. If you are using it frequently, your students will become knowledgeable of it and want to learn to be able to use it too. Many of my students knew nothing of podcasts before I introduced them, now they are active subscribers to many educational podcasts!
    -If you want an interactive classroom that is up to date with the real world education needed, then you need to be creating opportunity for yourself, your colleagues, and your students at every turn!


  • -Teacher/ School Websites are prevalent in most school systems, but not all are able to withstand interactivity and media rich files. Simply using a website for posting homework and assignments is very limiting, and truthfully boring to your students. It is important that your website include: blogs for student postings, resources with URLs for further study, linked access to the library and other necessary learning databases, links to gaming platforms (I highly suggest Quest Atlantis, and teen Secondlife is good too.), capability for student publications (students put in much more care when presenting before their peers), photo galleries for digital storytelling, a capacity for posting and viewing short films... the list is endless! If your school system’s platform is not feasible for these elements, I suggest that you either pay a nominal fee for a site domain yourself, or create a Ning or Wiki site. Ning allows you all of these elements as well as members-only access (which is great for keeping your class together and protected from outsiders).
    -Be knowledgeable by joining Ning in Education, Edutopia, and iNACOL to stay up to date on the world of K12 virtual learning and to be in touch with teachers implementing it every day. These 3 perfessonal journals and educator hubs possess a world of knowledge and tips for educators looking to enhance their learning with media.
    -There is definitely something to be said about the power of healthy competition, after all it is the very platform that most corporations thrive off of to keep our economy running. Our students must learn to be academically competitive with praise in a healthy educational way. This can be facilitated through the plethora of online academic contests available.
    -I once taught a small class of very low and unmotivated writers. After having given them the skills that they needed to win, I encouraged them all to participate in a local writing contest. They thought I was crazy! Never the less, I continued to encourage them and reminded them often of the possibilities of success. All but 1 ended up entering a piece of writing. When the results came, every one of those students was awarded a certificate, and all of the top 3 finalists were from that group! Now, I encourage student participation in every competition that I find that relates to my subject matter. I have found that, because of competing, they put more effort into all of their assignments and presentations and they work harder to understand the content. Other wonderful lessons provided through competitions, are those of civic participation and community involvement. Students no longer see themselves as a kid without connections; instead they feel empowered as contributors in their society and world!
    - A wise retired teacher once said to me, “You can’t expect your students to do what you aren’t doing ourselves!”
    -Perhaps this is the core of why education is not progressive in comparison to our technology-based society… too many teachers teach the way they were taught because they fear the unknown of learning something new!
    -I challenge you to explore the world of Web 2.0 technology and implement it into your teaching. There is a program entitled Udutu that offers a free trial. In this program, you can easily create web-based lessons from scratch and publish them for world-wide access and data collection through Facebook’s UdutuLearn and UdutuTeach. (Show my example lesson on the bill of rights.)
    -Zoho is a fabulous free collaboration and networking tool for creating group projects, presentations, documents…etc. Just about anything your students would create on a school’s computer, can be made in Zoho. One of my biggest peeves is when students are working as a group and Little Johnny forgot the disk or Sally has the flu and can’t work with her group. These problems are both eliminated in that Zoho is completely online and contributors can work on it from anywhere at any time without hindrance.
    -Besides these 2 specific programs, your instruction can be engaging by giving your students media projects to create.
    -Podcasts are wonderful for Literature lessons. (Share my podcast drama lesson- radio show.)
    -Creation of websites and webquests allow students to teach others, thus reach the highest level of learning.
    -I bet if you pooled your students as to who has created a video on youtube or watched one, you’d have 100% of the hands go up. Students love to be on film and they love to create films. Taking an element that they love and making it educational makes their learning engaging and fun.
    -Finally, just use the plethora of resources available to you all of the time in your classroom, whether it be a virtual school or in a standard school building. If you are using it frequently, your students will become knowledgeable of it and want to learn to be able to use it too. Many of my students knew nothing of podcasts before I introduced them, now they are active subscribers to many educational podcasts!
    -If you want an interactive classroom that is up to date with the real world education needed, then you need to be creating opportunity for yourself, your colleagues, and your students at every turn!


  • -Teacher/ School Websites are prevalent in most school systems, but not all are able to withstand interactivity and media rich files. Simply using a website for posting homework and assignments is very limiting, and truthfully boring to your students. It is important that your website include: blogs for student postings, resources with URLs for further study, linked access to the library and other necessary learning databases, links to gaming platforms (I highly suggest Quest Atlantis, and teen Secondlife is good too.), capability for student publications (students put in much more care when presenting before their peers), photo galleries for digital storytelling, a capacity for posting and viewing short films... the list is endless! If your school system’s platform is not feasible for these elements, I suggest that you either pay a nominal fee for a site domain yourself, or create a Ning or Wiki site. Ning allows you all of these elements as well as members-only access (which is great for keeping your class together and protected from outsiders).
    -Be knowledgeable by joining Ning in Education, Edutopia, and iNACOL to stay up to date on the world of K12 virtual learning and to be in touch with teachers implementing it every day. These 3 perfessonal journals and educator hubs possess a world of knowledge and tips for educators looking to enhance their learning with media.
    -There is definitely something to be said about the power of healthy competition, after all it is the very platform that most corporations thrive off of to keep our economy running. Our students must learn to be academically competitive with praise in a healthy educational way. This can be facilitated through the plethora of online academic contests available.
    -I once taught a small class of very low and unmotivated writers. After having given them the skills that they needed to win, I encouraged them all to participate in a local writing contest. They thought I was crazy! Never the less, I continued to encourage them and reminded them often of the possibilities of success. All but 1 ended up entering a piece of writing. When the results came, every one of those students was awarded a certificate, and all of the top 3 finalists were from that group! Now, I encourage student participation in every competition that I find that relates to my subject matter. I have found that, because of competing, they put more effort into all of their assignments and presentations and they work harder to understand the content. Other wonderful lessons provided through competitions, are those of civic participation and community involvement. Students no longer see themselves as a kid without connections; instead they feel empowered as contributors in their society and world!
    - A wise retired teacher once said to me, “You can’t expect your students to do what you aren’t doing ourselves!”
    -Perhaps this is the core of why education is not progressive in comparison to our technology-based society… too many teachers teach the way they were taught because they fear the unknown of learning something new!
    -I challenge you to explore the world of Web 2.0 technology and implement it into your teaching. There is a program entitled Udutu that offers a free trial. In this program, you can easily create web-based lessons from scratch and publish them for world-wide access and data collection through Facebook’s UdutuLearn and UdutuTeach. (Show my example lesson on the bill of rights.)
    -Zoho is a fabulous free collaboration and networking tool for creating group projects, presentations, documents…etc. Just about anything your students would create on a school’s computer, can be made in Zoho. One of my biggest peeves is when students are working as a group and Little Johnny forgot the disk or Sally has the flu and can’t work with her group. These problems are both eliminated in that Zoho is completely online and contributors can work on it from anywhere at any time without hindrance.
    -Besides these 2 specific programs, your instruction can be engaging by giving your students media projects to create.
    -Podcasts are wonderful for Literature lessons. (Share my podcast drama lesson- radio show.)
    -Creation of websites and webquests allow students to teach others, thus reach the highest level of learning.
    -I bet if you pooled your students as to who has created a video on youtube or watched one, you’d have 100% of the hands go up. Students love to be on film and they love to create films. Taking an element that they love and making it educational makes their learning engaging and fun.
    -Finally, just use the plethora of resources available to you all of the time in your classroom, whether it be a virtual school or in a standard school building. If you are using it frequently, your students will become knowledgeable of it and want to learn to be able to use it too. Many of my students knew nothing of podcasts before I introduced them, now they are active subscribers to many educational podcasts!
    -If you want an interactive classroom that is up to date with the real world education needed, then you need to be creating opportunity for yourself, your colleagues, and your students at every turn!


  • -Teacher/ School Websites are prevalent in most school systems, but not all are able to withstand interactivity and media rich files. Simply using a website for posting homework and assignments is very limiting, and truthfully boring to your students. It is important that your website include: blogs for student postings, resources with URLs for further study, linked access to the library and other necessary learning databases, links to gaming platforms (I highly suggest Quest Atlantis, and teen Secondlife is good too.), capability for student publications (students put in much more care when presenting before their peers), photo galleries for digital storytelling, a capacity for posting and viewing short films... the list is endless! If your school system’s platform is not feasible for these elements, I suggest that you either pay a nominal fee for a site domain yourself, or create a Ning or Wiki site. Ning allows you all of these elements as well as members-only access (which is great for keeping your class together and protected from outsiders).
    -Be knowledgeable by joining Ning in Education, Edutopia, and iNACOL to stay up to date on the world of K12 virtual learning and to be in touch with teachers implementing it every day. These 3 perfessonal journals and educator hubs possess a world of knowledge and tips for educators looking to enhance their learning with media.
    -There is definitely something to be said about the power of healthy competition, after all it is the very platform that most corporations thrive off of to keep our economy running. Our students must learn to be academically competitive with praise in a healthy educational way. This can be facilitated through the plethora of online academic contests available.
    -I once taught a small class of very low and unmotivated writers. After having given them the skills that they needed to win, I encouraged them all to participate in a local writing contest. They thought I was crazy! Never the less, I continued to encourage them and reminded them often of the possibilities of success. All but 1 ended up entering a piece of writing. When the results came, every one of those students was awarded a certificate, and all of the top 3 finalists were from that group! Now, I encourage student participation in every competition that I find that relates to my subject matter. I have found that, because of competing, they put more effort into all of their assignments and presentations and they work harder to understand the content. Other wonderful lessons provided through competitions, are those of civic participation and community involvement. Students no longer see themselves as a kid without connections; instead they feel empowered as contributors in their society and world!
    - A wise retired teacher once said to me, “You can’t expect your students to do what you aren’t doing ourselves!”
    -Perhaps this is the core of why education is not progressive in comparison to our technology-based society… too many teachers teach the way they were taught because they fear the unknown of learning something new!
    -I challenge you to explore the world of Web 2.0 technology and implement it into your teaching. There is a program entitled Udutu that offers a free trial. In this program, you can easily create web-based lessons from scratch and publish them for world-wide access and data collection through Facebook’s UdutuLearn and UdutuTeach. (Show my example lesson on the bill of rights.)
    -Zoho is a fabulous free collaboration and networking tool for creating group projects, presentations, documents…etc. Just about anything your students would create on a school’s computer, can be made in Zoho. One of my biggest peeves is when students are working as a group and Little Johnny forgot the disk or Sally has the flu and can’t work with her group. These problems are both eliminated in that Zoho is completely online and contributors can work on it from anywhere at any time without hindrance.
    -Besides these 2 specific programs, your instruction can be engaging by giving your students media projects to create.
    -Podcasts are wonderful for Literature lessons. (Share my podcast drama lesson- radio show.)
    -Creation of websites and webquests allow students to teach others, thus reach the highest level of learning.
    -I bet if you pooled your students as to who has created a video on youtube or watched one, you’d have 100% of the hands go up. Students love to be on film and they love to create films. Taking an element that they love and making it educational makes their learning engaging and fun.
    -Finally, just use the plethora of resources available to you all of the time in your classroom, whether it be a virtual school or in a standard school building. If you are using it frequently, your students will become knowledgeable of it and want to learn to be able to use it too. Many of my students knew nothing of podcasts before I introduced them, now they are active subscribers to many educational podcasts!
    -If you want an interactive classroom that is up to date with the real world education needed, then you need to be creating opportunity for yourself, your colleagues, and your students at every turn!


  • -Anyone familiar with the phrase, “mind the gap?” (audience recognition/ hands raise...etc.)
    -As I was traveling through London, I used the subway quite often and this phrase would ring in my ears. Just as a train car is stopping to unload and load you hear, in an English accent, “mind the gap,” which means pay attention that you do not fall trough the space between where you are and where you currently are, and where you are going.
    -We need to ‘mind the gap’ for our students now, so that they can ‘mind the gaps” in their futures. You see, there is a large gap between where K12 education is today and where the careers, media, and technology are taking us and our students. If our students can make the transition without fall, then we have succeeded; but unfortunately, too many students today are falling in the gap! They are not graduating college, maybe not even high school; and they are not getting jobs that will carry themselves through life without plunder. Those students are trapped behind bars of ability without possibility!
    -We have the tools today to bridge that gap for our students... for our school systems... and for ourselves!
  • -Anyone familiar with the phrase, “mind the gap?” (audience recognition/ hands raise...etc.)
    -As I was traveling through London, I used the subway quite often and this phrase would ring in my ears. Just as a train car is stopping to unload and load you hear, in an English accent, “mind the gap,” which means pay attention that you do not fall trough the space between where you are and where you currently are, and where you are going.
    -We need to ‘mind the gap’ for our students now, so that they can ‘mind the gaps” in their futures. You see, there is a large gap between where K12 education is today and where the careers, media, and technology are taking us and our students. If our students can make the transition without fall, then we have succeeded; but unfortunately, too many students today are falling in the gap! They are not graduating college, maybe not even high school; and they are not getting jobs that will carry themselves through life without plunder. Those students are trapped behind bars of ability without possibility!
    -We have the tools today to bridge that gap for our students... for our school systems... and for ourselves!
  • -Anyone familiar with the phrase, “mind the gap?” (audience recognition/ hands raise...etc.)
    -As I was traveling through London, I used the subway quite often and this phrase would ring in my ears. Just as a train car is stopping to unload and load you hear, in an English accent, “mind the gap,” which means pay attention that you do not fall trough the space between where you are and where you currently are, and where you are going.
    -We need to ‘mind the gap’ for our students now, so that they can ‘mind the gaps” in their futures. You see, there is a large gap between where K12 education is today and where the careers, media, and technology are taking us and our students. If our students can make the transition without fall, then we have succeeded; but unfortunately, too many students today are falling in the gap! They are not graduating college, maybe not even high school; and they are not getting jobs that will carry themselves through life without plunder. Those students are trapped behind bars of ability without possibility!
    -We have the tools today to bridge that gap for our students... for our school systems... and for ourselves!
  • Holcombe aimee pub_leadproject

    1. 1. YOUR INTERACTIVE CLASSROOM: FROM ANYWHERE Aimee Holcombe Middle School Teacher & Full Sail University Graduate in Educational Media Design and Technology
    2. 2. Aimee Holcombe Middle School Teacher & Full Sail University Graduate in Educational Media Design and Technology
    3. 3. UPGRADE NEEDED
    4. 4. UPGRADE NEEDED “We can’t learn the skills of our future with the tools of your past!” (Film: “No Future Left Behind,” By: Sufferin Middle School Students, 2009)
    5. 5. VIRTUAL LEARNING MYTHS
    6. 6. VIRTUAL LEARNING MYTHS K12 students lack the self discipline and skills needed to succeed in a virtual learning environment.
    7. 7. VIRTUAL LEARNING MYTHS K12 students lack the self discipline and skills needed to succeed in a virtual learning environment.
    8. 8. VIRTUAL LEARNING MYTHS K12 students lack the self discipline and skills needed to succeed in a virtual learning environment. Online learning can not facilitate the necessary interactivity and assessment that my physical classroom can.
    9. 9. VIRTUAL LEARNING MYTHS K12 students lack the self discipline and skills needed to succeed in a virtual learning environment. Online learning can not facilitate the necessary interactivity and assessment that my physical classroom can.
    10. 10. VIRTUAL LEARNING MYTHS K12 students lack the self discipline and skills needed to succeed in a virtual learning environment. Online learning can not facilitate the necessary interactivity and assessment that my physical classroom can. K12 virtual learning will never replace the standard school building.
    11. 11. VIRTUAL LEARNING MYTHS K12 students lack the self discipline and skills needed to succeed in a virtual learning environment. Online learning can not facilitate the necessary interactivity and assessment that my physical classroom can. K12 virtual learning will never replace the standard school building.
    12. 12. VIRTUAL LEARNING MYTHS K12 students lack the self discipline and skills needed to succeed in a virtual learning environment. Online learning can not facilitate the necessary interactivity and assessment that my physical classroom can. K12 virtual learning will never replace the standard school building. I can’t incorporate virtual learning into my classroom.
    13. 13. VIRTUAL LEARNING MYTHS K12 students lack the self discipline and skills needed to succeed in a virtual learning environment. Online learning can not facilitate the necessary interactivity and assessment that my physical classroom can. K12 virtual learning will never replace the standard school building. I can’t incorporate virtual learning into my classroom.
    14. 14. CREATING OPPORTUNITY
    15. 15. CREATING OPPORTUNITY Teacher/ School Websites that are interactive and media-rich.
    16. 16. CREATING OPPORTUNITY Teacher/ School Websites that are interactive and media-rich.
    17. 17. CREATING OPPORTUNITY Teacher/ School Websites that are interactive and media-rich. Be knowledgeable-- Join Ning in Education, Edutopia, and iNACOL
    18. 18. CREATING OPPORTUNITY Teacher/ School Websites that are interactive and media-rich. Be knowledgeable-- Join Ning in Education, Edutopia, and iNACOL
    19. 19. CREATING OPPORTUNITY Teacher/ School Websites that are interactive and media-rich. Be knowledgeable-- Join Ning in Education, Edutopia, and iNACOL Get your students and schools involved in projects and contests outside of the school!
    20. 20. CREATING OPPORTUNITY Teacher/ School Websites that are interactive and media-rich. Be knowledgeable-- Join Ning in Education, Edutopia, and iNACOL Get your students and schools involved in projects and contests outside of the school!
    21. 21. CREATING OPPORTUNITY Teacher/ School Websites that are interactive and media-rich. Be knowledgeable-- Join Ning in Education, Edutopia, and iNACOL Get your students and schools involved in projects and contests outside of the school! Create rich multimedia and teach your students to as well! (Udutu, Zoho, podcasts, websites, webquests, film... etc..)
    22. 22. CREATING OPPORTUNITY Teacher/ School Websites that are interactive and media-rich. Be knowledgeable-- Join Ning in Education, Edutopia, and iNACOL Get your students and schools involved in projects and contests outside of the school! Create rich multimedia and teach your students to as well! (Udutu, Zoho, podcasts, websites, webquests, film... etc..)
    23. 23. CREATING OPPORTUNITY Teacher/ School Websites that are interactive and media-rich. Be knowledgeable-- Join Ning in Education, Edutopia, and iNACOL Get your students and schools involved in projects and contests outside of the school! Create rich multimedia and teach your students to as well! (Udutu, Zoho, podcasts, websites, webquests, film... etc..) Actively use your resources regularly!
    24. 24. CREATING OPPORTUNITY Teacher/ School Websites that are interactive and media-rich. Be knowledgeable-- Join Ning in Education, Edutopia, and iNACOL Get your students and schools involved in projects and contests outside of the school! Create rich multimedia and teach your students to as well! (Udutu, Zoho, podcasts, websites, webquests, film... etc..) Actively use your resources regularly!

    ×