Water Quality Regulations and Legislation Affecting the Construction Industry<br />AGC of California Spring 2011 Conferenc...
Remarks On:<br /><ul><li>Construction General Permit; First year reaction to new requirements; training requirements update
Phase 1 California Communities and Caltrans MS4 Permits; new emphasis on runoff volume control and BMPs required to achiev...
EPA Policy on Numeric Limits for Stormwater Discharges; Effluent Limit Guidelines for Construction
Current Proposed Water Quality Legislation; potential SWPPP developer PE requirements and changes to income restrictions f...
QSD/QSP Program OverviewRequirements for becoming a Qualified SWPPP Developer (QSD) or a Qualified SWPPP Practitioner (QSP...
Will there be enough QSPs to manage and inspect job sites on or after 9/2/2011?<br />CASQA reports that more than 4,000 pe...
Latest Generation of Phase 1 MS4 Permits in California<br />Phase 1 MS4: > 250,000 pop.<br />Phase 2 MS4: >100,000 < 250,0...
MS4 Permits Require Storm Water Runoff Controls for Development Projects<br />Applies to new and redevelopment projects ge...
MS4 Permit Requirements Examples of Priority Projects<br />
The latest generation of MS4 permits in California includes requirements for:<br />Incorporating Low Impact Development (L...
LID principles incorporated into MS4 permits in California<br />Integrated Water Resources Management<br />Treating stormw...
Possible LID Best Practices<br />
Conducting a LID feasibility analysis: What does this mean practically speaking?<br />Requiring a detailed examination of ...
Federal Stormwater Regulatory Initiatives and Efforts (US EPA)<br />Numeric Effluent Limits in Stormwater Permits<br />Use...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Water Quality Regulations and Legislation Affecting the Construction Industry - Mark Gray

867 views

Published on

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
867
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
4
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Water Quality Regulations and Legislation Affecting the Construction Industry - Mark Gray

  1. 1. Water Quality Regulations and Legislation Affecting the Construction Industry<br />AGC of California Spring 2011 Conference<br />a presentation by<br />Mark Grey, Ph.D., Technical Director<br />Construction Industry Coalition on Water Quality<br />Building Industry Association of Southern California<br />
  2. 2. Remarks On:<br /><ul><li>Construction General Permit; First year reaction to new requirements; training requirements update
  3. 3. Phase 1 California Communities and Caltrans MS4 Permits; new emphasis on runoff volume control and BMPs required to achieve volume control
  4. 4. EPA Policy on Numeric Limits for Stormwater Discharges; Effluent Limit Guidelines for Construction
  5. 5. Current Proposed Water Quality Legislation; potential SWPPP developer PE requirements and changes to income restrictions for regional water board members</li></li></ul><li>
  6. 6. QSD/QSP Program OverviewRequirements for becoming a Qualified SWPPP Developer (QSD) or a Qualified SWPPP Practitioner (QSP) <br />QSP Qualifications:<br /> (Effective on 9/2/2011)<br />Be a QSD<br />OR OBTAIN<br />Certified Erosion, Sediment, and Storm Water Inspector (CESSWI)<br />2. Certified Inspector of Sediment and Erosion Control (CISEC)<br />AND<br />Must attend a state-sponsored or approved training course by 9/2/2011 and pass exam<br />QSD Qualifications:<br />(Effective Now)<br />1. Reg. Civil Engineer<br />2. Reg. Professional Geologist<br />3. Reg. Landscape Architect<br />4. Reg. Professional Hydrologist<br />5. Certified Professional in Erosion and Sediment Control (CPESC)<br />6. Certified Professional in Storm Water Quality (CPSWQ)<br />7. Professional in Erosion and Sediment Control Registered through NICET<br />AND<br />Must attend a state-sponsored or approved training course by 9/2/2011 and pass exam<br />To prepare and certify a SWPPP as of July 1, 2010, you must have the QSD credentials <br />shown in the box on the left and within 2 years attend and pass a training course. <br />Anyone can implement the SWPPP in the field now; but persons working in the field must <br />become a QSP by 9/2/2011 (see box on right side above)<br />
  7. 7. Will there be enough QSPs to manage and inspect job sites on or after 9/2/2011?<br />CASQA reports that more than 4,000 people have taken a QSD/P Class as of April 15, 2011<br />438 people are registered as QSDs (also qualified to be QSPs)<br />124 people are registered with the state as QSPs<br />State Water Board reports there are ~6,400 registered construction sites in California as of April 2011<br />Question: will there be enough QSPs by September 2, 2011 to manage construction job sites in California?<br />
  8. 8. Latest Generation of Phase 1 MS4 Permits in California<br />Phase 1 MS4: > 250,000 pop.<br />Phase 2 MS4: >100,000 < 250,000 pop.<br />
  9. 9. MS4 Permits Require Storm Water Runoff Controls for Development Projects<br />Applies to new and redevelopment projects generally more than 5,000 ft2<br />Applies to most public and private development projects, including roads<br />Requires preparation of a water quality management plan to treat runoff<br />Requires installation of water treatment and quantity controls<br />
  10. 10. MS4 Permit Requirements Examples of Priority Projects<br />
  11. 11. The latest generation of MS4 permits in California includes requirements for:<br />Incorporating Low Impact Development (LID) principles<br />Conducting a hard engineering feasibility analysis of using LID controls for runoff<br />Incorporating numeric standards for compliance (ex: EIA; Volume Capture; BMP performance) <br />Creating off-site or fee programs for non-compliance with LID requirements<br />Including hydromodification controls for stream protection<br />Generally integrated with LID and conventional runoff controls<br />Some of these measures<br />will be required in Caltrans projects<br />
  12. 12. LID principles incorporated into MS4 permits in California<br />Integrated Water Resources Management<br />Treating stormwater as a resource at all scales<br />Integrating stormwater into regional capture and groundwater augmentation<br />Mimic Predevelopment Hydrology<br />Use natural features<br />Use site design<br />Use LID BMP controls<br />Use distributed controls, not centralized facilities in all cases<br />
  13. 13. Possible LID Best Practices<br />
  14. 14. Conducting a LID feasibility analysis: What does this mean practically speaking?<br />Requiring a detailed examination of Infiltration, Harvest and Use, Evapotranspiration and Biofiltration before considering c conventional treatment control<br />Considering technical feasibility and perhaps economic feasibility of each or a combination of options for runoff controls<br />Considering environmental and societal factors in evaluating feasibility<br />Accommodating legacy issues, like Brownfields <br />Encouraging development in the urban footprint<br />
  15. 15. Federal Stormwater Regulatory Initiatives and Efforts (US EPA)<br />Numeric Effluent Limits in Stormwater Permits<br />Use in TMDLs<br />Incorporated into MS4 Permits<br />Moves away from iterative BMP approach<br />Ignores development context in watershed<br />EPA taking comments on guidance memo<br />Construction Site Effluent Limit Guidelines<br />Similar to CA CGP NALs and NELs ( for turbidity)<br />EPA published a limit, then court ordered EPA to reevaluate <br />EPA to release “menu” of options in June, with some recognition of local variability<br />
  16. 16. Pending Water Quality-related Legislation under Consideration in Sacramento<br />AB 1210 (Garrick). This bill seeks to require that a registered professional civil engineer prepare all construction SWPPPs<br />Creates considerable confusion and is at odds with CGP training requirements in 2009 adopted permit<br />AB 900 (Steinberg). This bill seeks to allow Regional and State Board members to act under California Political Reform Act of 1974; eases conflict of interest standards<br />Also tries to tackle 10% income rule<br />
  17. 17. For more information contact:Mark Grey, Ph.D.Director of Environmental Affairs, BIA of Southern CaliforniaTechnical Director, Construction Industry Coalition on Water Quality3891 11th StreetRiverside, CA 92501(951) 781-7310 (office)(909) 525-0623 (cell)(951) 781-0509 (fax)mgrey@biasc.orgmark@cicwq.comwww.biasc.orgwww.cicwq.com<br />

×