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HIV in Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Populations: Surveillance Update

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This presentation on HIV diagnoses among people from CALD communities was given by Praveena Gunaratnam from the Kirby Institute at AFAO'S HIV and Mobility Forum on 30 May 2016.

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HIV in Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Populations: Surveillance Update

  1. 1. HIV in Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Populations: Surveillance Update Praveena Gunaratnam| 30 May 2016
  2. 2. Outline 1. Where do people living with HIV in Australia come from? 2. What are the characteristics of CALD people living with HIV? 3. What don’t we know about HIV and CALD populations? HIV in Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Populations
  3. 3. 4.0 11.4 5.8 7.1 3.5 2.7 10.0 5.8 15.8 4.8 3.3 Where do people diagnosed with HIV in Australia come from?
  4. 4. Figure 1: Estimated number of people living with HIV by country/region of birth, Australia, 2014 4 0 5000 10000 15000 20000 25000 Australian born non- Indigenous Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people Born in Sub- Saharan Africa Born in South-East Asia Other country of birth Numberofpeople People living with HIV Number diagnosed Source: See Methodological Notes of the HIV, viral hepatitis and sexually transmissible infections in Australia: Annual Surveillance Report 2015 for detail
  5. 5. Figure 2: HIV diagnosis rate per 100 000 population, 2005-2014, by country/region of birth 5 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 Rateper100000 Year Australia Oceania and Antarctica North-West Europe Southern and Eastern Europe North Africa and the Middle East South-East Asia North-East Asia Southern and Central Asia Americas Sub-Saharan Africa Source: State and Territory health authorities
  6. 6. Figure 3: Proportion of diagnoses by country of birth (non-Australian born men), among diagnoses in men reporting male-to-male sex as risk exposure, 2005-2014 6 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 Proportion(%) Year Not reported Caribbean Central America North Africa and the Middle East North West Europe North East Asia Northern America Oceania and Antarctica South America South East Asia Southern and Central Asia Southern and Eastern Europe Sub-Saharan Africa Source: State and Territory health authorities
  7. 7. Figure 4: Number of new diagnoses in men (reporting an exposure risk other than male-to-male sex) 2005-2014, by risk exposure 7 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 Numberofdiagnoses Year Other/undetermined Partner from a high prevalence country Heterosexual contact not further specified Person from a high prevalence country Partner HIV risk* Injecting drug use Source: State and Territory health authorities
  8. 8. Figure 5: Number of new HIV diagnoses in women, 2005-2014, by risk exposure category 8 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 Numberofdiagnoses Year Other/undetermined Partner from a high prevalence country Heterosexual contact not further specified Person from a high prevalence country Partner HIV risk* Injecting drug use Source: State and Territory health authorities
  9. 9. Figure 6: Late HIV diagnoses, by country/region of birth and exposure category, 2010-2014 9 Source: State and Territory health authorities 22% 42% 33% 52% 37% 66% 23% 51% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% Male to male sex Heterosexual sex % diagnosed late Other South-East Asia Sub-Saharan Africa Australia
  10. 10. Figure 9: Proportion of late and advanced HIV diagnoses1, 2005-2014, by exposure category 10 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 2005-2006 2007-2008 2009-2010 2011-2012 2013-2014 Proportion(%) Year Late, From a high prevalence country Advanced, From a high prevalence country Late, Partner from a high prevalence country Advanced, Partner from a high prevalence country 1 Late HIV diagnosis was defined as newly diagnosed HIV infection with a CD4+ cell count of less than 350 cells/μl, and advanced HIV infection as newly diagnosed infection with a CD4+ cell count of less than 200 cells/μl.. Source: State and Territory health authorities
  11. 11. More likely to be female, have heterosexual exposure Estimated 20% undiagnosed 33-66% diagnosed late Similar retention in care and treatment outcomes In summary - How do people living with HIV from CALD and non-CALD backgrounds differ? Predominantly male and reporting male to male sexual exposure Estimated 12% undiagnosed 22-42% diagnosed late Similar treatment retention and outcomes CALD OTHER
  12. 12. What are some current knowledge gaps and how can they be filled? 12 GAPS SOURCES Incidence and prevalence ACCESS Cascade modelling for 2016 ASR Knowledge, attitudes and practices Surveys recently completed or ongoing in WA and NSW Asian Gay Periodic Survey Service provision Systematic review looking at migrant health- seeking Impact of visa regulations HIV in Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Populations
  13. 13. Thank you. For further information email pgunaratnam@kirby.unsw.edu.au Visit http://kirby.unsw.edu.au/ HIV in Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Populations

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