Historical Timelines Fire Starter  “ We Didn’t Start the Fire” a song by Billy Joel, circa 1989
We Didn’t Start the Fire <ul><li>In compliance with the Sunshine Standards, the class will conduct a lyrical study based o...
We Didn’t Start the Fire After the release of this song in 1989, Billy Joel stated…“ The World's always been kinda messed ...
We Didn’t Start the Fire <ul><li>Through this lesson students will demonstrate an  understanding of  historical chronology...
We Didn’t Start the Fire <ul><li>Each group will create a newsletter, brochure or flyer featuring items from the lyrics of...
Questions for Thought <ul><li>How was history made in your lifetime? </li></ul><ul><li>What impact do you think your gener...
<ul><li>Using Microsoft word, students will type articles about a chosen topic from the lyrics of the song.  </li></ul><ul...
Newsletter Rubric Organization (10 points possible)   Makes a complete and detailed description of the subject matter and/...
Sample
The End
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Fire starter

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Fire starter

  1. 1. Historical Timelines Fire Starter “ We Didn’t Start the Fire” a song by Billy Joel, circa 1989
  2. 2. We Didn’t Start the Fire <ul><li>In compliance with the Sunshine Standards, the class will conduct a lyrical study based on the people places and events performed in one of three versions of the song “We Didn’t Start the Fire” by Billy Joel. </li></ul>The Idea Click “The Idea”
  3. 3. We Didn’t Start the Fire After the release of this song in 1989, Billy Joel stated…“ The World's always been kinda messed up, it was messed up before I was born, it was messed up during the time that I lived and it will probably be messed up after I'm gone.  That doesn't mean you don't try the best that you can and make this a better world. ”
  4. 4. We Didn’t Start the Fire <ul><li>Through this lesson students will demonstrate an understanding of historical chronology and the historical perspective. </li></ul><ul><li>They will use listening, viewing, and speaking strategies effectively. </li></ul>
  5. 5. We Didn’t Start the Fire <ul><li>Each group will create a newsletter, brochure or flyer featuring items from the lyrics of the song. </li></ul><ul><li>20 items need to be included. </li></ul><ul><li>References must be provided. </li></ul>
  6. 6. Questions for Thought <ul><li>How was history made in your lifetime? </li></ul><ul><li>What impact do you think your generation have on world history? </li></ul><ul><li>When listening to your chosen version of the song, ask yourself: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Who are these people? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>What are these events? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Why are these things significant to history? </li></ul></ul>
  7. 7. <ul><li>Using Microsoft word, students will type articles about a chosen topic from the lyrics of the song. </li></ul><ul><li>Each student will write an article that explains the historical significance of that item. </li></ul><ul><li>Working as a team, students will layout the articles and collected pictures, cartoons, etc. into a newsletter. </li></ul>The Newsletter
  8. 8. Newsletter Rubric Organization (10 points possible) Makes a complete and detailed description of the subject matter and/or elements seen in a work. 7-10 points. Makes a detailed description of most of the subject matter and/or elements seen in a work. 4-6 points. Makes a detailed description of some of the subject matter and/or elements seen in a work. 0-3 points. Content Knowledge (30 points possible) Accurately describes several dominant elements or principles used by the artist and accurately relates how they are used by the artist to reinforce the theme, meaning, mood, or feeling of the artwork. 7-10 points. Accurately describes a couple of dominant elements and principles used by the artist and accurately relates how these are used by the artist to reinforce the theme, meaning, mood, or feeling of the artwork. Uses 1-2 criteria to judge the artwork. Student identifies the literal meaning of the work. 4-6 points. Describes some dominant elements and principles used by the artist, but has difficulty describing how these relate to the meaning or feeling of the artwork. Tries to use aesthetic criteria to judge artwork, but does not apply the criteria accurately. Student can relate how the work makes him/her feel personally. 0-3 points. Visual Appeal (10 points possible) Uses multiple criteria to judge the artwork, such as composition, expression, creativity, design, communication of ideas. Forms a somewhat reasonable hypothesis about the symbolic or metaphorical meaning and is able to support this with evidence from the work. 7-10 points. Accurately describes a couple of dominant elements and principles used by the artist and accurately relates how these are used by the artist to reinforce the theme, meaning, mood, or feeling of the artwork. Uses 1-2 criteria to judge the artwork. Student identifies the literal meaning of the work. 4-6 points. Describes some dominant elements and principles used by the artist, but has difficulty describing how these relate to the meaning or feeling of the artwork. Tries to use aesthetic criteria to judge artwork, but does not apply the criteria accurately. Student can relate how the work makes him/her feel personally. 0-3 points. Engagement (10 points possible) Uses multiple criteria to judge the artwork, such as composition, expression, creativity, design, communication of ideas. Forms a somewhat reasonable hypothesis about the symbolic or metaphorical meaning and is able to support this with evidence from the work. 7-10 points. Accurately describes a couple of dominant elements and principles used by the artist and accurately relates how these are used by the artist to reinforce the theme, meaning, mood, or feeling of the artwork. Uses 1-2 criteria to judge the artwork. Student identifies the literal meaning of the work. 4-6 points. Describes some dominant elements and principles used by the artist, but has difficulty describing how these relate to the meaning or feeling of the artwork. Tries to use aesthetic criteria to judge artwork, but does not apply the criteria accurately. Student can relate how the work makes him/her feel personally. 0-3 points.
  9. 9. Sample
  10. 10. The End

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