Best Practices for
Creating Safety Culture
Asish Ghosh
VP Manufacturing Advisory Services
ARC Advisory Group
AGhosh@ARCweb...
2
© ARC Advisory Group
Every Organization Has Safety
Culture, Operating at Some Level
Cultures are based upon shared
value...
3
© ARC Advisory Group
What is Safety Culture?
U.K. Health and Safety Commission:
“The product of individual and group val...
4
© ARC Advisory Group
Safety Culture Maturity Model
5
© ARC Advisory Group
Key Performance Indicators (KPIs)
People: Corporate Commitment and Responsibilities
Process: Progra...
6
© ARC Advisory Group
Safety Culture Maturity Matrix
People Processes Technology Support
Ground
Breaker
Corporation
commi...
7
© ARC Advisory Group
Safety Culture Maturity Matrix (Contd.)
People Processes Technology Support
Competitor There is an
...
8
© ARC Advisory Group
Overall Maturity
9
© ARC Advisory Group
Actions to Enhance Safety Culture
 Articulate a fully defined safety culture, supported at the
hig...
10
© ARC Advisory Group
For More Details …
Ask ARC for a copy of the report:
Best Practices for Process Safety Culture
11
© ARC Advisory Group
Thank You.
For more information, contact AGhosh@arcweb.com or
visit our web pages at
www.arcweb.co...
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ARC's Asish Ghosh's Creating Safety Culture Presentation Presentation at ARC's 2008 Industry Forum

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ARC's Asish Ghosh's Creating Safety Culture Presentation Presentation at ARC's 2008 Industry Forum in Orlando, FL.

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  • In the past, the emphasis was on technology, to increase safety and reduce incidents but that alone could not achieve the desired results. Increasingly, we are finding the importance of Culture as a determinant for safety in an organizationSo, what is Culture? It is shared values and beliefs It is the norm of a society or organizationI believe every organization has some level of Safety Culture, which may or may not be adequate In an organization with strong safety culture there is little tolerance for unsafe behaviors.There is pressure from managementHowever, peer pressure is more effective in preventing unsafe behavior and practices
  • In evaluating Safety Culture maturity we have set up four levels: ….Both Ground Breakers and leaders take safety seriouslyWhat separates the Ground Breakers from Leaders is their progress towards a common vision in the safety areaCompetitors generally aspire to be leaders, but they lack the intense focus on safety like the Groundbreakers and Leaders Followers do not focus on safety or do not perceive that safety is good for business. Sometimes they are ignorant of their shortcomings in this area.
  • In the survey we did we found:….It is interesting to find that there were more competitors than followers among those who took the surveyThat may be because no one wants to be a follower!!!
  • ARC's Asish Ghosh's Creating Safety Culture Presentation Presentation at ARC's 2008 Industry Forum

    1. 1. Best Practices for Creating Safety Culture Asish Ghosh VP Manufacturing Advisory Services ARC Advisory Group AGhosh@ARCweb.com
    2. 2. 2 © ARC Advisory Group Every Organization Has Safety Culture, Operating at Some Level Cultures are based upon shared values, beliefs, and perceptions that determine what is to be regarded as the norms for the organization. If an organization feels strongly about safe behavior, there will be little tolerance for deviation, and there will be strong societal pressures for conformance
    3. 3. 3 © ARC Advisory Group What is Safety Culture? U.K. Health and Safety Commission: “The product of individual and group values, attitudes, perceptions, competencies, and patterns of behavior that determine the commitment to, and the style and proficiency of, an organization’s health and safety management.“ Like any other culture, there is a lot of inertia built into the way an organization operates and safety culture in no exception. The challenge for the management is to overcome those inertias to navigate it to a higher level of safety awareness and culture
    4. 4. 4 © ARC Advisory Group Safety Culture Maturity Model
    5. 5. 5 © ARC Advisory Group Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) People: Corporate Commitment and Responsibilities Process: Programs, Procedures, and Management Technology: Equipment & Practice and Reporting Support: Worker Empowerment and Safety Training Once an organization has analyzed its mission, identified all its stakeholders, and defined its goals, it needs a way to measure progress toward those goals.
    6. 6. 6 © ARC Advisory Group Safety Culture Maturity Matrix People Processes Technology Support Ground Breaker Corporation committed to a fully defined Safety Culture and has made an integral part of day to day operations Periodic safety audits. Follow safety lifecycle management functions. Corporate level safety manager. Hazard assessment after every incident. Proactive asset management. Safety blog website. Strong worker involvement in safety policy. Proactive safety training. Up-to-date training resources Leader Corporation committed to a fully defined Safety Culture but has not made it an integral part of day to day operation No regular safety audits. Do not closely follow safety lifecycle management functions. Corporate level safety manager. Hazard assessment only after a major incident. Proactive asset management No safety blog website. Worker involvement in safety policy. Proactive safety training. Training resources not always updated
    7. 7. 7 © ARC Advisory Group Safety Culture Maturity Matrix (Contd.) People Processes Technology Support Competitor There is an informal safety program in place but it is not fully defined and does not necessarily have shared values No regular safety audits. Do not closely follow safety lifecycle management functions. Local level safety managers. Hazard assessment only after a major accident. No proactive asset management No safety blog website. Workers have limited involvement in safety policy. Safety training as needed. Training resources not always updated Follower No program in place and none planned No regular safety audits. Do not follow safety lifecycle management functions. No dedicated safety manager. Minimal hazard assessment after a major accident. No proactive asset management . No safety blog website. Little involvement of workers in safety policy. No formal safety training. Informal on the job training.
    8. 8. 8 © ARC Advisory Group Overall Maturity
    9. 9. 9 © ARC Advisory Group Actions to Enhance Safety Culture  Articulate a fully defined safety culture, supported at the highest levels  Inculcate shared values, beliefs, & perceptions, with defined expectations and accountability  Employ one or more full time safety managers that report to the highest levels of the management  Set up procedures for reducing incidents, which include: proactive asset management and written SOPs  Perform comprehensive hazard assessment after every incident or accident  Encourage employees to report on hazard conditions and set up a safety blog website that is accessible to all employees  Actively encourage workers to participate in safety activities allowing them to influence safety policy implementations  Set up safety training and refresher courses for all new and veteran employees, on-site contractor personnel, & visitors
    10. 10. 10 © ARC Advisory Group For More Details … Ask ARC for a copy of the report: Best Practices for Process Safety Culture
    11. 11. 11 © ARC Advisory Group Thank You. For more information, contact AGhosh@arcweb.com or visit our web pages at www.arcweb.com “An organization with a vigorous safety culture is always in a more secure position to avoid accidents and is better prepared when such an incident happens.”

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