Bioversity International Strategic Plan 2014-2024

1,128 views

Published on

A presentation by Ms Ann Tutwiler, Director General, Bioversity International on ‘Bioversity International’s sharpened strategy’ on 28 May 2014.

Published in: Science, Technology
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
1,128
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
39
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
16
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • TEXT + 2 PICTURES AT THE BOTTOM
  • TEXT + 2 PICTURES ON THE RIGHT
  • TEXT + 2 PICTURES AT THE BOTTOM
  • TEXT + 2 PICTURES AT THE BOTTOM
  • TEXT + 2 PICTURES AT THE BOTTOM
  • TEXT + 2 PICTURES AT THE BOTTOM
  • TEXT + PICTURE ON THE RIGHT
    To change the photo
    -Right click on the photo
    - Click on change
  • TEXT + PICTURE ON THE RIGHT
    To change the photo
    -Right click on the photo
    - Click on change
  • TEXT + PICTURE ON THE RIGHT
    To change the photo
    -Right click on the photo
    - Click on change
  • TEXT + PICTURE ON THE RIGHT
    To change the photo
    -Right click on the photo
    - Click on change
  • Bioversity International Strategic Plan 2014-2024

    1. 1. Presenter Ann Tutwiler Topic Bioversity International Strategic Plan 2014-2024 Date 28 May 2014 Venue Australian Centre for International Agricultural Research Acknowledgements: Ann Tutwiler(2014), Bioversity International Strategic Plan 2014-2024, ACIAR Seminar Series presentation, 28 May 2014, Canberra, Australia.
    2. 2. STRATEGIC PLAN, 2014-2024
    3. 3. BioversityInternationalY.Wachira OUR VISION: AGRICULTURAL BIODIVERSITY NOURISHES PEOPLE AND SUSTAINS THE PLANET
    4. 4. Challenge: Increase Productivity Rising global food demand requires increased agricultural productivity and reduced food losses
    5. 5. Challenge: Reduce Double Burden of Malnutrition  30 million overweight children live in developing countries  Number of overweight adults in developing countries tripled between 1980 and 2010  Malnourished children lose 10% of lifelong earnings
    6. 6. Challenge: Adapt to Climate Change  Up to 40% of the world will develop novel climates, often with new pest and disease complexes
    7. 7. Challenge: Reduce Vulnerability  Up to 30% of arable land is marginal and fragile land  Desertification and drought affect 1.5 billion people
    8. 8. Challenge: Expand Options  Increasing crop yields and stress tolerance requires genetic diversity  Intensification of agricultural systems has led to a substantial reduction of biodiversity
    9. 9. Biodiversity Offers Solutions Convention on Biodiversity International Treaty on Plant Genetic Resources for Food and Agriculture Commission on Plant Genetic Resources
    10. 10. OUR MISSION: TO DELIVER SCIENTIFIC EVIDENCE, MANAGEMENT PRACTICES AND POLICY OPTIONS TO USE AND SAFEGUARD AGRICULTURAL BIODIVERSITY TO ATTAIN SUSTAINABLE GLOBAL FOOD AND NUTRITION SECURITY
    11. 11. Our Strategic Objectives Strategic Objective 1: Low-income consumers have expanded access to and use of affordable, nutritious diets. Strategic Objective 2: Rural communities have increased the productivity, ecosystem services and resilience of farming systems, forests and landscapes. Strategic Objective 3: Farm households and rural communities have increased access to a diversity of quality seeds and other planting materials Strategic Objective 4: Policymakers, scientists and rural communities have safeguarded, assessed and are monitoring priority agricultural biodiversity.
    12. 12. Our Theory of Change
    13. 13. Strategic Objective One: Consume Strategic Sub-Components  Farm households and rural communities manage nutrition sensitive landscapes  Agrifood sectors mainstream nutrition sensitive value chains  Households improve dietary quality through a whole of diet approach Bioversity International will  Investigate how agricultural biodiversity within food production systems and the access to nutritionally-rich food sources contribute to dietary diversity  Identify effective and equitable policies to close nutritional gaps and improve the quality of diets through diversity For example: climate change and nutritional resilience
    14. 14. Strategic Objective Two: Produce Strategic Sub-components  Farm households use agricultural biodiversity to sustainably intensify their systems, reduce enterprise risk and increase profitability  Rural communities benefit from managing diversity in forests  Rural communities integrate agricultural biodiversity into landscape management practices for enhanced ecosystem services Bioversity International will  Explore how the use of agricultural biodiversity within broader landscapes to improve rural livelihoods, productivity, resilience, and deliver ecosystem services. For example: restoration of degraded lands
    15. 15. Strategic Objective Three: Plant Strategic Sub-components:  Farm households and rural communities use a diversity of planting materials to enhance productivity, nutrition and adaptation  Formal and informal seed systems deliver high quality, diverse planting materials required by farm households and rural communities Bioversity International will  Work with stakeholders to develop ‘smart seed systems’ that are responsive to biotic and abiotic stresses to improve productivity, resilience, dietary diversity and quality  Develop policy options in support of high quality, diversified seed systems For example: banana disease management
    16. 16. Strategic Objective Four: Safeguard Strategic Sub-components  Global treaties and conventions use a shared mechanism for monitoring agricultural biodiversity status and trends  National policymakers adopt mechanisms for safeguarding agricultural biodiversity and knowledge  Farm households, rural communities, scientists, breeders and policymakers have information on priority traits Bioversity International will  Develop systems for providing farm households and rural communities, scientists, breeders and policymakers with information on priority traits.  Promote global actions for monitoring and safeguarding priority agricultural biodiversity to increase current and future options for improved productivity and nutrition. For example: Coconut Genebank; Timber Tracking
    17. 17. Focus: People and Global Public Goods People  Farm households  Rural communities and landscapes  Urban consumers  Women and children Global Public Goods  International treaties and conventions  Banana, Coconut Genebanks
    18. 18. Focus: Markets  Value Chains: nutrition and resilience  Commercial and pre- commercial systems: rural and urban markets  Marginal and remote regions, local production and consumption  Poor and vulnerable communities: nutrition- oriented interventions and social policies
    19. 19. Geography Limited number of low-income countries or ecosystems in Asia- Pacific, Mekong, India sub-continent, East/Central/West Africa, Central American, Andes Criteria will include:  high levels of agricultural biodiversity;  high vulnerability to climate change;  high levels of malnutrition.  long-standing Bioversity partnerships and CRP engagement Emerging partner countries, e.g Brazil
    20. 20. Crops and Trees  Cropping systems and forests  Neglected and underutilised species,  Nutritionally and economically useful trees, and  Vegetatively-propagated crops  Generate income  Enhance resilience and adaptive capacity of production systems  Improve dietary quality  Secure future options
    21. 21. CGIAR Research Programs  Humidtropics; Drylands; Aquatic Agricultural Systems  Policy, Institutions and Markets  Roots, Tubers and Bananas  Agriculture for Nutrition and Health  Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security  Water, Land and Ecosystems  Forests, Trees and Agroforestry
    22. 22. Partners  National research systems  Advanced research institutes  Development organisations and international bodies  Local, national and global agri-food value chain actors  Timber concessionaries  Conservation organisations
    23. 23. Why Bioversity International?  Biodiversity integrates multiple scientific disciplines to provide an agricultural biodiversity lens on the adaptation of food systems to climate change, rural transformation, provision of environmental services, nutrition and dietary transformation  Biodiversity boasts expertise in value chains, nutrition, landscape ecology, environmental services, information management, bioinformatics and genomics  Biodiversity combines multidisciplinary team of agronomists, population geneticists, plant breeders, entomologists, economics, anthropologists, law and policy  Bioversity brings strong partnerships with NARs, farmers organizations and NGOs
    24. 24. www.bioversityinternational.org

    ×