SoCiAl sTuDiEs BlOg

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SoCiAl sTuDiEs BlOg

  1. 1. Social studies<br />
  2. 2. Oceans activities <br />
  3. 3. Earth oceans<br />Class activity type I<br />Read, highlight, and write T or F for each statement:<br />JUSTIFY YOUR FALSE ANSWERS!!<br />Salt in the oceans comes from rocks(F ).<br />Most of the salt is sodium chloride-table salt ( T).<br />Water pressure is the amount of salt water ( F).<br />Oceans have the saltiest water on Earth ( F).<br />The salinity of the oceans change a lot from place to place ( F).<br />Something else that depends on the oceans pressure is depth (F ).<br />At the surface the water is warmed by sea animals ( F).<br />75% of the oceans has a temperature between 0°c and 3°c ( F).<br />T o study the oceans scientists use planes or helicopters ( F).<br />Some of the conditions of the oceans depends on the waters surface(F ).<br />
  4. 4. False answers<br />1. Salt in the oceans comes from minerals the are washed out from the land.<br />3. The downward push of water is called water pressure.<br />4. Oceans don’t have the saltiest water on earth. The saltiest water on earth its in a Dead sea in Israel.<br />The salinity of the oceans don’t change much from place to place.<br />Something else that depends on the oceans depth is pressure.<br />At the surface the water is warmed by the sun and by warm air above the surface.<br />About 90% of ocean has a temperature between 0°c and 3°c.<br />To study the oceans, scientists use small submarines called submersibles.<br />But other conditions of the ocean depends on the waters depth. <br />
  5. 5. how does ocean <br />WaterMoves?<br />Class activity type I<br />Read, highlight, and answer:<br />Define:<br />a)Wave <br />b) Tsunami<br />c) Tide<br />d) Storm surge<br />e) El Niño<br />2. Compare and contrast:<br />Currents-waves<br />How is a surface current different from a current near coast?<br />Compare the types of tides.<br />
  6. 6. answers<br />Definitions:<br />a)Wave = A wave is the up-down movement of the surface water of the ocean.<br />b)Tsunami = The great energy of an earthquake or a volcanic eruption can produce a wave called Tsunami.<br />c)Tide = The rise and fall in the water level of the ocean is called a tide.<br />d)Storm surge = The mound of water that pushes onto shore in a hurricane is called a storm surge.<br />e)El Niño = A change in the weather pattern in the Pacific Ocean.<br />2. Compare and contrast current and waves:<br />NEXT PAGE<br />
  7. 7. DIFFERENCES<br />CURRENTS<br />WAVES <br /><ul><li>Is the up-down movement of the surface water.
  8. 8. These carry energy, not water across the ocean.
  9. 9. Inside the waves water turns into small ovals.
  10. 10. The mound of water that pushes onto shore in a hurricane is called a Storm Surge.
  11. 11. A stream of water that flows like a river through the ocean.
  12. 12. These carry water great distances across the surface.
  13. 13. These current erode and deposit sand helping shape beaches.
  14. 14. The coastal water stays very warm, this warm causes an EL NIÑO. A change in the weather pattern in the Pacific Ocean.</li></li></ul><li>SIMILARITIES<br /> CURRENTS & WAVES<br /><ul><li>They both have an air that pushes the water of the ocean forward.</li></ul>3. How is surface current different from a current near coast?:<br />A surface current that is also known as a Large current, these carry water great distances across the surface. But the ones near the coasts erode and deposit sand, helping shape beaches.<br />4. Compare the types of tides:<br />NEXT PAGE<br />
  15. 15. 4. Compare the types of tides:<br />SPRING TIDES<br />LOW TIDES<br />HIGH TIDES<br />NEAP TIDES<br />When the moon and the sun along their effects produce spring tides.<br />Smaller changes occur during neap tides than with spring tides.<br />The level of the oceans is higher in the bugles, producing high tides.<br />In the parts of the ocean between the bugles the water level is lower. At those places the low tide occurs.<br />
  16. 16. What forces shape shorelines?<br />Class activity type I<br />Read, highlight, and answer the questions:<br />Define:<br />a)Shore<br />b)Headland<br />c)Tide pool<br />d)Jetty<br />2. Describe how a shore can be changed.<br />3. What are 2 futures that can be seen along shore?<br />4. Which human activities affect shore?<br />5. How the explorers have been able to travel deep into oceans?<br />
  17. 17. answers<br />Definitions:<br />a)Shore = Is the area where the ocean and the land meet and interact.<br />b)Headland = When the soft rock is worn away, the hard rock left behind may form a point of land called headlands.<br />c)Tide pool = It’s a temporary pool of ocean water.<br />d)Jetty = It’s a wall-like structure that sticks out into oceans.<br />2. Describe how a shore can be changed.<br /> In some places there may be sand or soft rock that waves easily wear away. In other places there may be hard rock that does not wear away as easily. Soft rock and hard rock may also be together.<br />
  18. 18. 3. What are 2 futures that can be seen along shore?<br />1st future:<br />The shore is a flat beach covered with pebbles.<br />2nd future: <br />At other places along a shore, there may be a steep cliff, like the second in the investigate.<br />4. Which human activities affect shore?<br />First, it makes some beaches smaller and other larger. Second, it fills in channels which the become too shallow for boats to pass through. <br />5. How the explorers have been able to travel deep into oceans?<br />Because the scientists discovered that diving bells, diving suits, and submarines have made deep sea possible. Scientists also send down remote-controlled vehicles equipped with cameras. <br />

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