Add Value Doing Less1.   Embrace Constraints                                  6.      Be Curators2.   Build Half a Product...
Embrace Constraints
Build Half a Product
Start at the Epicenter
Ignore Details Early On
Decisions are Progress
Be Curators
Throw Less at the    Problem
Focus on what Doesn’t       Change
You Are the Tone
Sell Your By-Products
Summary1.   Embrace Constraints                                  6.      Be Curators2.   Build Half a Product             ...
5Q Communications "Less Is More" Lightning Speech (Pecha Kucha)
5Q Communications "Less Is More" Lightning Speech (Pecha Kucha)
5Q Communications "Less Is More" Lightning Speech (Pecha Kucha)
5Q Communications "Less Is More" Lightning Speech (Pecha Kucha)
5Q Communications "Less Is More" Lightning Speech (Pecha Kucha)
5Q Communications "Less Is More" Lightning Speech (Pecha Kucha)
5Q Communications "Less Is More" Lightning Speech (Pecha Kucha)
5Q Communications "Less Is More" Lightning Speech (Pecha Kucha)
5Q Communications "Less Is More" Lightning Speech (Pecha Kucha)
5Q Communications "Less Is More" Lightning Speech (Pecha Kucha)
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5Q Communications "Less Is More" Lightning Speech (Pecha Kucha)

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At 5Q we have a culture of learning. As such we have a monthly Lightning Speech (Pecha Kucha fashion) where employees share what they are learning. We hope you will benefit as well. Enjoy!

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  • \n
  • • It’s not about having enough time, money, people, or experience.\n• Limited resources force you to make do with what you’ve got.\n• Having no room for waste forces you to be creative\n
  • • Southwest flies only 737s, unlike most airlines.\n• Easier training, more versatility with staff—they can work any flight. etc...\n• Fewer parts—the same parts fit all their planes.\n• Lower cost—easier to run.\n• By embracing constraints they made it easier on themselves\n
  • • You can’t do everything you want to do and do it well.\n• Sacrifice some of your darlings for the greater good.\n• Many “great ideas” are pretty lame after you gain some perspective\n
  • • Pixar has a track record of creating block-buster films.\n• They cut dozens of good scenes and dialogue to focus on telling a better story\n• The results of those sacrifices... every computer animated film they release has been a runaway success.\n
  • • Ignore what you “could do” and “want to do” and focus on what you “have to do”\n• Ask, “Which part of this equation can’t be removed?” Start there.\n• Everything else you do depends on the foundation, make it the best it can be.\n
  • • The most important part of a hot dog stand is not the condiments... it’s the hot dog\n• You can focus on providing all the condiments, a fancier cart, better signage, etc...\n• While those things may enable to you to be more versatile, they aren’t the hot dogs.\n
  • • Details do make the difference, but nail the basics first.\n• Don’t worry about things you don’t have to, until you have to.\n• It’s hard to predict which details are important until you have something real\n
  • • Walt Stanchfield was a famed drawing instructor for Disney\n• Encouraged animators to forget the detail\n• You often can’t recognize the details that matter most until later\n
  • • Put off decisions pile up.\n• Commit to making decisions, don’t wait for the perfect solution.\n• You can’t build on, “We’ll decide it later.” It may not be best, but you can at least build\n• You’ll get plenty wrong by planning anyway\n• You don’t have to live with a decision forever.\n
  • • Basecamp avoided creating an affiliate program, the “perfect” solution was too complicated\n• They started by paying affiliates in credit instead of cash.\n• That approach worked until they figured out a better solution\n
  • • Make conscious decisions about what stays and what goes. \n• Pare things down until you’re left with what matters most, or what provides the best experience.\n• Museums don’t display all their art at once, or display it all in a single room. \n• Their collection is what makes them great!\n• Curators say, “No!” to what goes on the walls.\n\n
  • • Zingerman’s is one of America’s best-known delis. The owners think of themselves as curators\n• They only sell products they believe are great! \n• Every product is tasted. Every supplier has a relationship with them. \n• Zingerman’s sells pasolivo olive oil because they love everything about it, they vouch for it\n• We must think of ourselves the same way.\n\n\n
  • • Trim down what you offer, and polish it.\n• Realize the natural inclination is to throw more at the problem. That equals bigger problems\n• If you start pushing back deadlines and increasing the budget you’ll never stop.\n
  • • I’ve watched numerous episodes of Kitchen Nightmares.\n• There’s a pattern, big menus, often 30+ items. That means lots of inventory, etc..\n• Bigger menus decrease a restaurants appeal. They mean more inventory, more spoiled food, more frustrated customers, more skilled cooks, more staff, and usually worse food.\n\n
  • • Be on alert for the “trend” vortex. Trends focus on fashion instead of substance.\n• What are the things people want today and will still need in 10 years? Get those right!\n• In software this may look like: speed, security, ease-of-use, and relevancy\n
  • • Focus on fast (or free) shipping, great selection, friendly return policies, and affordable prices.\n• Those things will always be in high demand.\n
  • • It’s not about the tools. Don’t use the “equipment” argument as a crutch.\n• Shortcuts don’t displace discipline. The best gear won’t make you the best.\n• It’s like listening the Mac vs. Windows debate. Or digital vs. film photography.\n• These don’t focus on what makes the work great.\n
  • • Begin a guitar player I realize great sound comes from the guitarist, not the guitar.\n• A relatively inexpensive guitar can make beautiful sound when a skilled musician picks it up.\n• It’s great having a good guitar, but it’s not necessary to begin making music.\n
  • • When you make something you’re always making something else.\n• Train yourself to be observant and business minded to spot these by-products\n• What can’t you ignore? What are the routine decisions you make?\n• Routine decision making = Waste. Convert waste into winnings\n
  • • Sawmills can’t ignore the sawdust. They’d been working hard to get rid of it for decades.\n• Someone realized if they mixed it with glue and pressed it into a form they could make particle board.\n• In other industries this is often Know-How!\n• Knowledge › Teaching › Blogging › PDF = Book. Book = Product. Product = $\n
  • \n
  • 5Q Communications "Less Is More" Lightning Speech (Pecha Kucha)

    1. 1. Add Value Doing Less1. Embrace Constraints 6. Be Curators2. Build Half a Product 7. Throw Less At The Problem3. Start at the Epicenter 8. Focus on What Doesn’t Change4. Ignore Details Early On 9. You Are The Tone5. Decisions Are Progress 10. Sell Your By-Products concepts and ideas repurposed from REWORK by Jason Fried & David Heinemeier Hansson
    2. 2. Embrace Constraints
    3. 3. Build Half a Product
    4. 4. Start at the Epicenter
    5. 5. Ignore Details Early On
    6. 6. Decisions are Progress
    7. 7. Be Curators
    8. 8. Throw Less at the Problem
    9. 9. Focus on what Doesn’t Change
    10. 10. You Are the Tone
    11. 11. Sell Your By-Products
    12. 12. Summary1. Embrace Constraints 6. Be Curators2. Build Half a Product 7. Throw Less At The Problem3. Start at the Epicenter 8. Focus on What Doesn’t Change4. Ignore Details Early On 9. You Are The Tone5. Decisions Are Progress 10. Sell Your By-Products concepts and ideas repurposed from REWORK by Jason Fried & David Heinemeier Hansson

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