SA consumer, marketing & media trends feb'13 rev5

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  • SA consumer, marketing & media trends feb'13 rev5

    1. 1. 2013 Consumer,Marketing & MediaTrendsJanuary 2013
    2. 2. Consumer trends in SA Shoppers will be prudent and seek value - „more for more‟.2
    3. 3. Shoppers will be prudent and seek value - „more for more‟ South Africans tend to be „brand butterflies‟ – seeking well known brands but not always staying loyal. Since 2007 fewer middle classconsumers say “I treat myself to things I don‟t need”; inparticular in UK, South Africa & the USA. Source: TGI 2012 3
    4. 4. Consumers will be more clued up with critical information attheir fingertips about what is right & fairConsumers now only have to “Google‟ to find width anddepth of information as well as opinions from a widespectrum of both brand advocates and brand detractors!And in SA the mobile phone is now the “first port of call” whensearching: 14% of adults 15+ search via PC compared with17% who search via cell phone.4 Source: AMPS 11/12
    5. 5. The black middle class has vast economic power Marketers are attracted to this group because of perceived growth. Marginal Strugglers (15.6m) : 45% of population & 37% of spend Skilled Strugglers (2.7m): 8% of population & 12% of spend Not a homogeneous group, household income ranges widely from R3,800-R13,700 p/m. • Marginal Strugglers are the mass middle class, amongst whom there is despondency due to lack of jobs. • Skilled Strugglers are the upper end of middle class, with reasonably high levels of education; they seek value and are shopping around more than ever before in many categories.Source: UL Majority Report 2012 5
    6. 6. Consumers will want to tell stories about their purchases As brands tell stories that arent known to the masses, and as experiences and non-consumption-related expenditures take over from physical (and more visible) status symbols, consumers will increasingly have to tell each other stories to achieve a status dividend from their purchases. There will be a shift from brands telling a story, to brands helping consumers tell status-yielding stories to other consumers.6 Source: Trendwatching.com 2013
    7. 7. Consumers will play an active role in shaping/changing brands?Understanding theconsumer journey & howdifferent segments makedecisions, the influencersof those decisions &drivers of engagementis a critical component forfuture success. Pick „n Pay is the number one Engager brand in SA 7 Source: SA Engager benchmark study 2011 - Yellowood
    8. 8. Consumers will want apps that save time & effort• Downloading popular mobile apps via capable handsets (17% of Smartphone owners have recently downloaded an App). • 28% of consumers use their smartphones• Most popular apps are entertainment- for price comparisons or product info related e.g. music, social networking & when shopping. games. • 20% have also changed their minds about a purchase, as a result of retrieving info via a smartphone. • 25% use their smartphones when• 15% of users have used a mobile shopping physically. coupon in a store. • 47% have directly shopped via the device• Almost 84% of users have noticed in the past month. mobile advertising, mostly on search engines.• Almost 70% have taken action after seeing a mobile ad. 8 Source: Mobile Planet 2012
    9. 9. Marketing trends in SA Shopper marketing will be key & brands need to build gaming type experiences.9
    10. 10. • Shoppers are demanding richer interactive Shopper marketing browsing & purchasing experience - memorable brand entertainment. will be key & brands • Shoppers are becoming more dependent on their need to build gaming mobile devices as part of an integrated experience. • We will see more integration of retailers online type experiences operations & bricks-and-mortar stores, to attract customers & increase sales. e.g. Mr Price Online now has an online store‚ which allows shoppers to have their purchases delivered to their street address‚ post office or store for R35. • Brand owners & retailers will build loyalty & strengthen bonds by offering customers value- added services in-store & at the point of purchase. • Driving loyalty programs is critical („burn and earn‟) e.g. eBucks and PnP – the list is huge!. • ZMOT (Zero moment of truth) is now key.The number of locals shopping online hassteadily increased over the past two years, with58% of active internet users saying that they usethe internet for shopping; up from 53% in 2010and 44% during 2009. 10 Source: MasterCard‟s survey (Dec‟12)
    11. 11. Consumers are getting closer to and more involved Brands are verbs with the brand experiences via co-creation & social media. & their success is shaped by Brands are harnessing the power of the Internet & their consumers social media by optimising user-generated content (UGC). Brands that understand the power of co- creating together with consumers tap into the creativity of their biggest fans. This also means encouraging and actively participating in reviews of their products and conversations around them, on both their own & third party websites.Laundry brand Omo participated in an international competition held by MOFILM (an organisation whichprovides creative content to internet & mobile phone companies) in which itasked consumers around the world tomake their own short film on the theme of its brand vision, Dirt is Good. 11
    12. 12. Social Media is spreading brandsviews & news much fasterSocial media spreads brand values andexperiences like wild-fire and being intouch with consumers 24/7 allows forconstant relevancy in their lives.Many companies are recognising thepotential of social media, with its impactbeing felt along the entire value chain. e.g. FNB has created an online personality called RBJacobs that has quickly become a credible & approachable representation of the brand on Twitter, Facebook & LinkedIn. RBJacobs allows FNB‟s social media team to maintain a single style & ad tone-of-voice that is now synonymous with FNB‟s social media presence. 12
    13. 13. Brands need„activations‟ to helpthem stand out from thecrowd Carling Black Label "Be the Coach" campaign took consumer interactivity to new levels, with soccer fans casting 11 m votes to pick the teams for a special cup match between SAs top 2 teams, the Kaiser Chiefs & Orlando Pirates. The campaign allowed fans to select a player in a preferred position via USSD. Participants then heard from the coaches of the teams via pre- recorded messages. Then, during the actual match, watched by 80,000 in the stadium and millions on TV, fans got to actually vote via mobile for a live substitution! 13
    14. 14. Consumers lead both real & digital lives simultaneouslyBrands need to answer the demand forintegrating the real & digital world seamlessly. LEGO is an innovative brand in the digital ecosystem, having breathed new life into its „brick‟ by recognising its mature users & kids interaction that the web has allowed. 1. Play with the past to preserve expectations of original users: LEGO Factory is a free download that allows users to design & order their own toys. 2. Use the present to build brand loyalty with kids in the web era: LEGO Club offers content & tools to stimulate creativity of children. My LEGO Network is a kids platform for creating their own web page & sharing creations. ReBrick is a sharing platform for kids 13+. LEGO CUUSOO is about fan creativity where LEGO asks its community to create & submit designs for feedback. 3. Develop the brand through innovative partnerships: LEGO has learned to interact with fans & leverage online communities, not control them. LEGO Ambassadors & LEGO Universe Partners align themselves with communities of passionate consumers, to jointly define the company‟s next innovation. 4. Since 2008 LEGO Digital Boxes have been in test: An interactive augmented reality kiosks that allow children to visualise the content of each box in 3D. Lego‟s new Robot kit Reptar" EV3 Mindstorms kit (which can talk to iPhones & other Apple devices) launched at Consumer Electronic will go on sale In July 2013 14
    15. 15. Mobile is key for consumer• The importance of mobile connectivity in connectivity our lives is growing each year.• While the simplicity of a single device may be desirable, consumers are acquiring an increasing number of devices whose utility is a function of their ability to be connected.• With the demand for a widening array of devices unlikely to satiate in the near future, a growing proportion of devices will become connected.• Connectivity becomes a core functionality as it adds value to devices and to content.15 Source: Deloitte Mobile Consumer Survey 2013
    16. 16. Macro demographictrendsYoung marketDon‟t ignore BOPGrowth of middle classTransport drives shopper access
    17. 17. Demographic trends in SA We are a very young & majority black market17
    18. 18. We are a very young market: 50,586 m people 15,813 m (31%) are under the age of 15 (AMPS only measures 15+) 6,000,000 12 10 10 11 10 000s % 10 5,000,000 9 8 4,000,000 7 8 3,000,000 5 4 4 2,000,000 3 4 3 2 1,000,000 1 1 1 0 0 80+ 10 to 14 15 to 19 20 to 24 25 to 29 30 to 34 35 to 39 40 to 44 45 to 49 50 to 54 55 to 59 60 to 64 65 to 69 70 to 74 75 to 79 0 to 4 5 to 918 Source: STATS SA Mid-year 2011 estimate
    19. 19. Contextualising SA‟s BOP (Bottom of Pyramid)Number of households & Total averageaverage monthly income: household income: 3,920 mR2,493 (29%) LSM 1-4 R9,773 bill (6%) 5,352 m LSM 5-6 R30,737 bill R5,743 (38%) (18%) 2,709 m LSM 7-8 R48,797 bill "If you build it for R18,013 (19%) (28%) the poor, the rich can come. If you build it for the 2,093 m LSM R83,940 bill rich, the poor cant R40,105 (14%) (48%) come.“ 9-10 C.K.Prahalad Total Households: 14,075 m Average household income per month: R12,31019 Source: AMPS 2011/2012
    20. 20. We are seeing upward LSM movementas population gains access to betteropportunities & services 100% 90% 80% 70% 60% Profile 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 LSM 8-10 20 21 23 24 23 23 LSM 6-7 27 28 29 31 34 34 LSM 3-5 39 39 38 38 36 36 LSM 1-2 14 12 11 8 7 7 20 Source: AMPS 2008-2012
    21. 21. Size of the middle class (LSM 5-6) is strongly evident 9000 8000 Growing middle class 7000 numbers: LSM 5-6 up 6000 from 32% in 2007 to 5000 39% in 2012 000s 4000 3000 2000 1000 0 LSM 1 LSM 2 LSM 3 LSM 4 LSM 5 LSM 6 LSM 7 LSM 8 LSM 9 LSM 10 2007: 31,110 m 1287 3034 3366 4290 4516 5379 2885 2096 2359 1898 2008: 31,304 m 1062 2729 2878 4525 4855 5682 2932 2175 2561 1905 2009: 32,498 m 1031 2436 2610 4641 5153 6086 3182 2449 2895 2015 2010: 34,020 m 808 1944 2394 4744 5636 6891 3621 2830 3038 2114 2011: 34,934 m 701 1608 2204 4459 6071 7774 3932 2911 3153 2120 2012: 34,934 m 661 1430 2143 4586 6008 7896 4038 2894 3190 208821 Source: AMPS 2008-2012
    22. 22. Only LSM 8-10 adults 15+ are not a black majority 100% 90% 80% 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% Total LSM 1 LSM 2 LSM 3 LSM 4 LSM 5 LSM 6 LSM 7 LSM 8 LSM 9 LSM 10 15+ Black Coloured Asian White LSM 7 functions as a tipping point, sometimes behaving like LSM 6 (displaying emerging market behavior and characteristics) and sometimes behaving like LSM 8 (displaying characteristics and behavior of developed markets)Source: Amps 2011/12
    23. 23. Type of transport determines access to retail outletsMini bus taxis dominate up to LSM 5-6 with private transport kicking in at LSM 7-8 Mode % Total LSM LSM LSM LSM aged 15+ 1-4 5-6 7-8 9-10 Mini bus taxi 52 59 68 63 15 Train 3 2 3 4 2 Bus 9 10 11 10 4 Private car 45 21 32 47 93 24 Source: AMPS Junl‟11-Jun‟12
    24. 24. Media Trends in SA 2013 - Increasing channel fragmentation & uptake of digital media… The digital home is becoming a reality25
    25. 25. More media choicesConsumers are consuming more mediavia more devices more often26
    26. 26. The South African Media Universe The media solar system is much busier than ever before PC & mobile device Social media users ownership PC - 4,300 m (12%) * Cell phone - 1,600 m (5%) * 28,971 m have cell phone (83%) * Hours/week, Int 23% have access to ernet, 3.82 Internet at LSM 7+ LSM 7+ People home * People viewing Each month using the consumers are 3+ hours per Internet for 5+ using more week of media across hours per recorded TV: more devices week: 1,385 TV ownership 1,305 m (7%) # under the sun (7%) # iPod 645k (1.9%) * Hours/week, TV , 3.4 One, 2 Games Consol 3,765 Two, 5 ,485 1,004 m (3%) * Have TV set in Three, home 31,194 m 1,994 PC (80%) * 2,195 m (6%) * DStv in home 9,665 m (28%) VCR 2,887 m * (8%) * DVD Player PVR in home 678k (2%) * 18,513 m (53%) * HD PVR in home – 488k (1.4%) ** Source: AC Nielsen, AMPS‟12 (universe: 34,934 m adults aged 15+# Source: TGI 2012, Adults LSM 6+ (universe: 18,896 m, 54% of total)
    27. 27. Access Internet = 8% * Listen to Radio = 93% Have cell phone = 83% * Commercial = 90% View TV = 92% * Digital channels will continue to Community = 26% *Will remain king for now, expand strongly, with mobile Radio will become more activated & cross-over intobut messaging needs to overtaking PC as first choice for web other experiential platforms like internet, mobile & be relevant & break access. off-line activations, events & experience. through. Go to Cinema = 8% * Digital sound & picture will enhance the viewing experience. Theatres will offer multi-touchpoint engagement. Read Papers = 50% Dailies 31% Weeklies 33% * Read Magazines = Newspaper circulations 50% * will be stagnant, but Magazines will continue to relevant titles will still offer high engagement deliver consumer reader-specific prospects. environments. Viewers & Readers will be consuming more Seen ads on OOH = 88% screens more OOH Home will continue to often. fragment whilst offering new & exciting formats. 28 Source: AMPS‟Jul‟11-Jun‟12 (* = weekly reach potential by medium), print is average issue readership
    28. 28. The Digital Home isbecoming a realityHomes have multiple devices29
    29. 29. There are now multiple devices in home SCREEN ACCESS IN HOME % MOBILE & ON-LINE CONSUMERS % 89 Own / rent / use Cell. Average of 2.2 cell DVD phones per home player 81.8 Internet access at home DStv Internet access sub at work Desktop 51 Internet Laptop access OOH Mobile Internet 13% of homes have VCR access Internet access (1,811 m) Games Consol Access Tablet 0.4 27 Internet at place Dial up 1 PVR study Wirless 14 2 connection 12 13.0 8 ADSL 3 6.0 4.9 2 3 4.0 3.0 Wireless network 4.5 Mobile network 8 Mobile WAP 8 14,074 m households 34,934 m adults aged 15+ Mobile Internet 1130 Source: Amps‟12, adults aged 15+
    30. 30. Video viewing isbecoming morecomplexTV still king & growingSome viewing on other devices31
    31. 31. Television continues to growalbeit at a slower rate 100 Past 7 day viewership has grown from 80 78% in 2005 to 92% in 2011/12. 60 40 SA Pay TV (DStv) now reaches 20 29%, having grown viewers fast via their 0 Compact entry-level offering. 2007 2009 2012 The launch of the only competitive S1 S2 S3 eTV DStv Top Community TV satellite offering, Top TV, has had minimal effect in the marketplace. TV Clutter is increasing & noting declining. Viewing of TV More channels to online is at 4% & come & growth of via cell phone 2% community TV.32 Source: Amps‟11/12, adults aged 15+
    32. 32. SA is facing the same evolution as other marketsaround the world; the development of “3-screen”consumption: TV, Internet & Mobile.In most developed markets the two smallerscreens have matured and taken share away fromthe television screen.But for now TV is the primary audio-visualplatform in SA. But let‟s not downplay how quickly technology will adapt our consumption patterns of these three screens: • DStv has Mobile TV (the Drifter) • DStv has launched VOD (Video On Demand) to its premium subscribers, Box Office. • Incidence of time-shift viewing via PVR is growing off a small base. • Smart phones are growing very quickly here and price is not longer a barrier for the poorer or younger cohorts. • Broadband capacity will improve considerably in the near future and will quickly explode Internet connectivity & usage. 33
    33. 33. Strong growth forInternetStrong growth fromlow base34
    34. 34. Access to Internet has grown strongly in a short space of time Internet % Yesterday Past week Past month Adults 15+ (Amps) Jun‟11 11 16 18 Jun`12 13 19 22 Adults LSM 9-10 Jun‟11 39 52 57 Jun`12 46 59 64 60 52 49 50 Internet activities % 40 30 Internet activities % 24 25 20 13 13 16 14 14 11 12 8 5 6 10 2 1 2 3 3 3 4 4 0 Listen to Shop Read/access Directory Music Games Chat/Instant Banking Social E-Mail Search Radio current Services downloads messaging Networking news/articles LSM 8-10 Total 15+ AMPS 2011/12 Source: AMPS
    35. 35. Internet Trends in 2013Internet penetration is on anupwards trend and is a keypriority for both the Department Increased access is dependentof Communications and the on capacity of SA‟s underseaindustry as a whole. cable, which is projected to grow as follows:Online access from a laptop ordesktop is primarily used by 2011 2.69 Terabits per second (Tbps)higher LSM‟s for now, withaccess at work being key. End 2012 11.0 Tbps (projected) 2013 24.6 Tbps (projected)
    36. 36. Mobile cannot beignoredLeap-frogging internetas key device37
    37. 37. Smart phone penetration = 15% (Source: Google Mobile Planet survey 2012) Phones in home Send SMSs 62.1 83% of adults Send PCMs 61.8 in SA have a Take photos 39.2 cell phone Listen radio station 26.0 Play Games 23.8 Take video 22.5 recordings Dload / Listen to 20.7 music Send/Receive 20.6 MMSs Access Internet or 18.3 Web Social Networking 18.1 Instant messaging 17.5 The cell phone numbers38 Source: AMPS‟Jul‟11-Jun‟12 2/15/2013
    38. 38. Mobile trends for 2013 There are 53 million cell phone connections in South Africa and some citizens have more 105% Mobile Penetration than one active SIM card (to capitalise on freebies from different networks). The most popular phone in South Africa is not Blackberry, but rather the Samsung E250, with 60% of feature sales having reached 4.5m. It comes with a phones are WAP web browser, FM radio, music player and enabled Bluetooth. This translates to 7.5 million South Africans. Smartphone penetration increased by 3% in the 2nd Quarter of 2012, while the feature 15% have phone market declined by 4%. Smart 44% of smartphones are Blackberry due to phones low data charges. Source: Yonder Media, Jan 2012, Mobile Insights Report,39 AdMobi, 2012 and Pixelvulture Infographic 2/15/2013
    39. 39. Use of social media isgrowing fast Mobile access is key40
    40. 40. Cell phones have overtaken desktops as primary device for social networking % % 19 33 6 3 14 12 Social networking via PC Social networking via cell phone Source: AMPS‟Jul‟11-Jun‟12
    41. 41. Social Media Users in SAFacebook: 7m viadesktop & 6 m viamobileMxit: 7.2 m activeusersLinkedin: 2.2 mTwitter: 1.1 mPinterest: 360 k South Africans are highly social, and Facebook is the most pervasively used social networking platform, especially amongst higher LSMs. Mobile is a key means of access to Facebook. 42 Source: Socialbakers.com
    42. 42. 8. Radio is becomingmore activatedHigh reachUse of multi-touchpointsSome listening via other devices
    43. 43. Radio continues to deliverstrong regional reach 50% 40% ¼ hour Mon-Fri: am & pm drive-time 30% 20% Average 10% hours 0% listened per 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 Dec-11 Oct-12 Dec-12 day: 3h31 Wide range of stations genres & footprints 93% 26% listened to listened to community radio radio P7 P7 days days Listening on DStv audio channels 0.5%, online 4.1% & via cell phone 26.0% 44 Source: RAMS Dec‟12, adults 15+
    44. 44. Radio is healthy with some winners and losers SABC ALS is losing Radio is being used Average time spent ground to English around a big idea & listening is slightly stations due to encourages listener / DJdown, P7D listenership is ubanisation e.g. interaction: on-stable. Number of stations Metro, Gagasi, Heart. We air, mobile, internet, soci listened to p/week at have strong regionals: al platform, on-the- a stable 2.1. Station formats & 94.7, OFM, Jakaranada ground, experience, etc. touchpoints have & Many community changed; moving from E. Coast stations, although they audio to interaction: often lack funding, are finding new ways to not professionally connect with, grow loyal managed & are not listeners & increase reliable with flighting ad revenue. logs. Source: AMPS‟Jul‟11-Jun‟12 & RAMS 2012
    45. 45. OOH is fragmentingWide range of options with new regionaltendersGrowth of digital formats off small baseMarketers making more use of smallerformats
    46. 46. OOH now offers much more innovation, creativity & targeting; with cost and clutter varying by situation. Sees ads on in past 7 Days Trailers 31 Bus Shelters 38 Building Wraps 40 Static OOH formats are slowly Buses 47 becoming digitised, with the aim Bins 54 of increased noting levels and Billboards 73 revenue share (but is still an “under researched” medium). Mini bus taxis 77 Considerable amounts of consumer time is spent daily in captive transit mode; via either public or private transport. Shopping frequencies are growing between usual bulk month-end “big shop”; with brand switching decisions made at shelf; so talking to these shoppers closest to point-of-purchase (ZMOT) is more critical than ever.47 Source: AMPS‟Jul‟11-Jun‟12
    47. 47. OOH trends in 2013 More digital sites available but still too expensive (x8 times There will be little media rate more expensive than a static inflation, +-4% anticipated when comparing 2013 with 2012. billboard), but is the impact worthwhile? There will also be no rate inflation this year for the larger formats. Additional activity closer to POS e.g. in malls, tavern s, bars, pubs , clubs New tenders for street ACSA has cut furniture down on airport (street clutter poles, bus internally & shelters) externally (but opening up e.g. prices will go Durban but up to reap same could create revenue) clutter in other areas 48Source: AMPS‟Jul‟11-Jun‟12
    48. 48. Print is gaining andlosing selectivelyMagazines are holding onNewspaper readership is inslight decline
    49. 49. The Magazine Landscape is still holding its own Online magazine readership reflects a 34% YOY growth off a small base; with 4% reading a magazine or newspaper online. The average magazine reader buys more than 3 publications per month. Magazine content & related touchpoints have also changed significantly. Established magazines are E-Zines & magazine websites with still enjoying high reader exclusive content are growing loyalty and invested interest. significantly, with publishers‟ realising that consumers need “more value” & The Audit Bureau of information on the go. Circulation reports on 512 (audited) titles. Glamour uses SnapTag QR codes toReadership provide extra content Jun Dec Jun that is relevant to anis down 11 11 12 already-engagedmarginally % group of users.Magazines 50.9 50.5 48.8 Source: AMPS‟ 09/10, 01/11 & 11/12
    50. 50. Newspapers are not really growing, but there are exceptions. In 2004 the Daly Sun had 2.3 m readers (8%), but by 2012 that figure had doubled to 5.7 m (16%). It is now the most widely read daily newspaper in the country. (Source: AMPS 04-12) According to 2012 Q3 data from ABC, circulation of daily newspapers has declined annually by 5.75% since 2008, equivalent to 461,000 copies. Source: ABCNewspaper Jun Dec Junpenetration % 11 11 12Daily newspapers 30.3 30.8 30.9Weekly newspapers 33.5 34.1 32.8Total Newspapers 48.0 48.9 50.0 Source: AMPS‟Jul‟11-Jun‟12
    51. 51. Cinema remainsniched but impactful3D driving growthSelective audienceInclusion of more experiential touchpoints
    52. 52. Attendance reflects steady growthYOY, driven by accessibility e.g.new malls & 3D. Competition forvideo entertainment is increasinglycoming from uptake of newtechnology like online moviedownloads, shorter times of DVDrelease & PVR time-shift viewing. 2,317 m (5.7%) of Audience threats are Attendance are 72% are <34 adults 15+ have high ticket cost for small & are very years, 68% are seen to cinema in consumers & high „title dependent‟ LSM 8-10 & 77% the past month. CPT‟s for live in metro areas advertisers. Cinema attracts limited but highly engaged numbers 53 Source: AMPS‟Jul‟11-Jun‟12
    53. 53. Cinema Trends for 2013 Better picture Will offer & sound: engagement More Ways to increase High frame rates will blockbusters to beyond the screen: ad noting: impact the viewer attract moreexperience & advertising Offering customers a multi- Millward Brown shows that e.g. „The Hobbit: An audience: touchpoint experience; ad noting increases byUnexpected Journey‟ was from digital ticket +38% when using cinema first blockbuster to be With digital purchase, foyers, queues, c in combination with shown at High Frame projection, movies can be atering dwell time, ticketing television. Rate 3D. launched locally closer to to onscreen experience. release date.Dolby Atmosa sound also We will also see moremoves around the theatre. cinema OOH. 54 Source: AMPS‟Jul‟11-Jun‟12
    54. 54. Thank you55

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