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Daily Five     BY: Gail Boushey and Joan Moser                      Chapter 3:What’s the Difference?: Key Materials, Conce...
When we follow routines day after day, ourstudents can use their energy to grow as readers  and learners rather than to fi...
Key Materials, Routines, and           Concepts Establish a gathering place for brain and body   breaks Develop the conc...
Gathering kids in front for instruction, releasingthem to practice, and then bringing them back to share their thinking re...
Establish a Gathering Place Have one regardless of the age you teach It is another way to influence children to be succe...
Good-Fit Books A Child’s purpose for reading, interest in a topic, and   ability to comprehend play as large a role in fi...
I PICK                  (good-fit books)I choose a bookP urpose- Why do I want to read it?I nterest- Does it interest me?C...
The Sisters compare book     selection to shoe selection Different shoes have different purposes (show a   variety of sho...
Good-Fit Books: Tips Create a yearlong anchor chart to help students   remember the IPICK strategy Spend time helping st...
Good-Fit Books: Tips                 Continued… Have them model book choices in front of class Send home a newsletter to...
How this helps?We know that the very best way to grow as a readeris to spend lots of time reading, and the majority of    ...
Setting up Book Boxes Each child should have a personal collection of good-fit   books at hand while reading Before the ...
Children in classrooms with themost books consistently outperformtheir peers who are in classrooms       with little to no...
3 Ways   I PICK         Anchor Charts                        to Read                                                      ...
Short Intervals and Repeated                  Practice Memory stored in the kinesthetic system evokes the   longest memor...
Short Intervals and Repeated Practice                  cont. Introducing each component includes a three-minute   indepen...
Never set a timer because thechildren’s behaviors should determine       when the signal is given   Do not use a punishing...
Signals Get children’s attention in a calm and respectful way Come up with a signal to get the students attention so the...
Check-In Check-In is used in connection with the I-charts Helps children become more aware of the expectations and   how...
Correct Model/Incorrect Model Modeling is key to teaching Daily Five routines Begin by discussing what the skill looks l...
“The beginning of the year is all about establishing routines, defining expectations,  practicing behaviors, and building ...
•   PowerPoint presentation by Antoinette Day @                    http://4321teach.blogspot.com/* Note: The Daily 5 and C...
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Daily five chapter 3

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Daily five chapter 3

  1. 1. Daily Five BY: Gail Boushey and Joan Moser Chapter 3:What’s the Difference?: Key Materials, Concepts, and Routines for Launching the Daily Five
  2. 2. When we follow routines day after day, ourstudents can use their energy to grow as readers and learners rather than to figure out what weexpect them to do. And we in turn, can focus our energy on teaching, not managing, our independent learners. - Kathy Collins
  3. 3. Key Materials, Routines, and Concepts Establish a gathering place for brain and body breaks Develop the concept of “good-fit books through a series of lessons Create anchor charts with students for referencing behaviors Short, repeated intervals of independent practice Calm signals and check-in procedures Use the correct model/incorrect model approach for demonstrating appropriate behaviors
  4. 4. Gathering kids in front for instruction, releasingthem to practice, and then bringing them back to share their thinking represents the steady flow that is at the heart of effective teaching and learning. -Stephanie Harvey and Anne Goudis (Strategies That Work)
  5. 5. Establish a Gathering Place Have one regardless of the age you teach It is another way to influence children to be successful Distractions are limited and proximity allows you to check in on behavior more effectively Students are able to turn and talk to each other, engaging everyone in the conversation of the lesson Provides time for a change in their brain work along with much- needed movement of their bodies
  6. 6. Good-Fit Books A Child’s purpose for reading, interest in a topic, and ability to comprehend play as large a role in finding a good-fit book as readability The challenge lies with teaching children to be empowered to choose good-fit books for themselves It requires frequent conversations to help children learn It is one of the most important things to do to become a better reader
  7. 7. I PICK (good-fit books)I choose a bookP urpose- Why do I want to read it?I nterest- Does it interest me?C omprehend- Am I understanding it?K now- I know most of the words.
  8. 8. The Sisters compare book selection to shoe selection Different shoes have different purposes (show a variety of shoes) Just like we choose which shoes to wear for which activity, we have a purpose when we choose books Just like we choose shoes to wear with our various interests, we choose books of interest Just like we choose shoes that fit us perfectly, we choose books that are not too hard and we understand
  9. 9. Good-Fit Books: Tips Create a yearlong anchor chart to help students remember the IPICK strategy Spend time helping students find books using the strategy Share the strategy with your librarian When a child asks for help choosing a book, always ask their purpose and what they are interested in first
  10. 10. Good-Fit Books: Tips Continued… Have them model book choices in front of class Send home a newsletter to parents explaining the strategy Revisit I PICK at least once a month
  11. 11. How this helps?We know that the very best way to grow as a readeris to spend lots of time reading, and the majority of the time needs to be with a good-fit book. Children who learn to select good-fit books will no longer wander aimlessly in a library or classroom collection looking for books - Gail Boushey and Joan Moser
  12. 12. Setting up Book Boxes Each child should have a personal collection of good-fit books at hand while reading Before the first day of school, set up a collection for each child so they have books on the first day Collect books from classroom library, public library, donations, garage sales, etc. Add to your classroom library each year
  13. 13. Children in classrooms with themost books consistently outperformtheir peers who are in classrooms with little to no library. - Jim Trelease (2001)
  14. 14. 3 Ways I PICK Anchor Charts to Read Boos As each component is introduced, the class comes together to make an anchor chart- “I” (for independent) Chart Discuss, whole group, student and teacher behaviors and add to the charts Post charts in the room so the children’s thoughts and learning can be referred to yearlong
  15. 15. Short Intervals and Repeated Practice Memory stored in the kinesthetic system evokes the longest memory. Movement is stored in muscle memory and becomes part of our default behaviors. In each Daily Five lesson, the class auditorally brainstorms correct behaviors on the I Chart Next, children model these behaviors in front of the class (visual) Last, the whole class practices behaviors kinesthetically for three minutes
  16. 16. Short Intervals and Repeated Practice cont. Introducing each component includes a three-minute independent practice period (can be a little longer for older grades) Repeat often throughout the weeklong launching phase This process successfully prepares children for extended peroids of independent work The length of this period depends on the behavior of the students. If even one student is off-task, call the whole group back to the gathering area to reflect on the practice time
  17. 17. Never set a timer because thechildren’s behaviors should determine when the signal is given Do not use a punishing tone in response to a child off-task. Withencouragement and practice, he/she will increase stamina.
  18. 18. Signals Get children’s attention in a calm and respectful way Come up with a signal to get the students attention so they know it’s time to gather and check back in (the Sisters used chimes) Explain the signal and its purpose carefully to students Make an anchor chart with students about what it looks like and sounds like (record students names with their suggestions)
  19. 19. Check-In Check-In is used in connection with the I-charts Helps children become more aware of the expectations and how successful they were as they worked Come up with a sign for the students to reflect upon their work (could be thumb up or to the side)  Reflection sign is related only to them- shouldn’t worry about what sign classmates are showing  Don’t suggest a thumb down as it could give negative attention  As the Sisters say, “We are all works in progress”
  20. 20. Correct Model/Incorrect Model Modeling is key to teaching Daily Five routines Begin by discussing what the skill looks like A student demonstrates correct behaviors while the teacher points out behaviors that are encouraged A student demonstrates incorrect behaviors while the teacher points out behaviors which are discouraged Children are able to CLEARLY see what’s expected and what they should not be doing
  21. 21. “The beginning of the year is all about establishing routines, defining expectations, practicing behaviors, and building staminawith children within the Daily Five framework,and it takes lots of discipline on the children’spart as well as the teacher’s. We move slow to eventually move fast. The payoff is enormous.” - Gail Boushey and Joan Moser
  22. 22. • PowerPoint presentation by Antoinette Day @ http://4321teach.blogspot.com/* Note: The Daily 5 and CAFE are trademark and copy written content of Educational Design, LLC dba The 2 Sisters. Educational Design,LLC dba The 2 Sisters does not authorize or endorse these materials.

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