In 2012, only 1 in 6 people livedin countries with a free press.KEY TRENDSB Intensified efforts to blocknew mediaB Media op...
Greece’s score dropped from 30 to41 points and its status fell from Freeto Partly Free due to closures of, orcutbacks at, ...
ISRAEL PARTLY FREE Press Freedom Score 31eFINANCIAL PRESSURE,POLITICAL INTERFERENCEIN THE PRESSIn Israel, the score fell f...
MALI PARTLY FREE Press Freedom Score 46eARBITRARY ARREST OFJOURNALISTS, PRESSRESTRICTIONSMali, traditionally one of Africa...
MALAWI PARTLY FREE Press Freedom Score 53eRESTRICTIVE LAWREPEALED, HARASSMENTAND VIOLENCE REDUCEDMalawi’s score improved f...
ECUADOR NOT FREE Press Freedom Score 61eSTATE INTERFERENCE,HOSTILE ENVIRONMENTFOR THE PRESSEcuadorean President Rafael Cor...
EGYPT NOT FREE Press Freedom Score 62eVIOLENCE, INTIMIDATION,STATE INTERFERENCEIn Egypt, the score declined from 57 to62, ...
THAILAND NOT FREE Press Freedom Score 62eRESTRICTION OFFREE SPEECHThailand moved from 60 to 62 points,and fell from Partly...
BURMA NOT FREE Press Freedom Score 72eRELEASE OF IMPRISONEDJOURNALISTS,CENSORSHIP DECLINEImpressive gains were recorded in...
CÔTE D’IVOIRE NOT FREE Press Freedom Score 61eDECLINE IN LEGALRESTRICTIONS,OPENING OF AIRWAVESCôte d’Ivoire’s score improv...
AFGHANISTAN NOT FREE Press Freedom Score 67NEW PRIVATE OUTLETS,MORE INDEPENDENTREPORTINGIn Afghanistan a continuing decrea...
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Freedom of the press 2013 infographic

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Dit rapport is onderdeel van de perskit van http://www.freedomhouse.org/ - 42Bis deelt dit slechts hier om het gemakkelijk toegankelijk te kunnen maken.

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Freedom of the press 2013 infographic

  1. 1. In 2012, only 1 in 6 people livedin countries with a free press.KEY TRENDSB Intensified efforts to blocknew mediaB Media openings in West Africaand AsiaB Press crackdown in Mali andGuinea-BissauB Economic crisis weakenspress freedom in EUWorst of the WorstNot FreePartly FreeFreeFREEDOM OF THE PRESS 2013COUNTRIES WITH NOTABLE DEVELOPMENTS
  2. 2. Greece’s score dropped from 30 to41 points and its status fell from Freeto Partly Free due to closures of, orcutbacks at, numerous print andbroadcast outlets; a related reductionin media diversity and effective re-porting about the country’s politicaland economic situation; and height-ened legal and physical harassmentof journalists.GREECE PARTLY FREE Press Freedom Score 41eHEIGHTENED ECONOMIC,LEGAL, AND POLITICALPRESSURE ON THE PRESSA riot policeman punches Greek photojournalist Tatiana Bolari during a demonstration in Athens’ Syntagma (Constitution)square on October 5, 2011. (REUTERS/Yannis Behrakis)
  3. 3. ISRAEL PARTLY FREE Press Freedom Score 31eFINANCIAL PRESSURE,POLITICAL INTERFERENCEIN THE PRESSIn Israel, the score fell from 30 to 31,and the status declined from Free toPartly Free, to reflect the indictment ofjournalist Uri Blau for possession ofstate secrets, the first time this law hadbeen used against the press in severaldecades, as well as instances of polit-icized interference with the content ofIsraeli Broadcasting Authority radioprograms and concerning the licenserenewal of Channel 10. In addition, theeconomic impact on media sustain-ability posed by Israel Hayom, a freenewspaper and now the largest-circu-lation daily, led to financial pressureson other dailies and the collapse andbuyout of the daily Maariv in 2012.Haaretz journalist Uri Blau speaks to the media at the end of a court hearing in Tel Aviv on July 24, 2012. Blau was con-victed of possession of classified army documents, and according to a deal he signed with the State of Israel that wasapproved by the court, the journalist would serve four months of community service work. (OREN ZIV/AFP/GettyImages)
  4. 4. MALI PARTLY FREE Press Freedom Score 46eARBITRARY ARREST OFJOURNALISTS, PRESSRESTRICTIONSMali, traditionally one of Africa’s topperformers, suffered the index’s larg-est single-year decline in a decade,falling from 24 to 46 points and fromFree to Partly Free due to repressionof the media in the south as a resultof the March military coup, and thenear-complete suppression of pressfreedom in the north, which wasseized by Islamist militants. Viola-tions in the south included a tempo-rary suspension of the constitution,arbitrary arrests of journalists, thetakeover of the state broadcaster,and restrictions on reporting on thecoup. In the north, militants closedor took over nearly all outlets andimposed a crude form of Islamic law.Harassment and attacks on journal-ists were prevalent in both sectionsof the country.Malian journalists take to the streets of Bamako on July 17, 2012 during a day of ‘Dead Press’ to protest recent attacksagainst journalists by armed men believed to be linked to the former junta. No private newspapers were printed and pri-vate radio stations did not broadcast for the day as part of the protest, which was organized by local press groups with thesupport of Reporters Without Borders. (HABIBOU KOUYATE/AFP/GettyImages)
  5. 5. MALAWI PARTLY FREE Press Freedom Score 53eRESTRICTIVE LAWREPEALED, HARASSMENTAND VIOLENCE REDUCEDMalawi’s score improved from 60 to 53as the country experienced a reversal ofa downward slide when new presidentJoyce Banda took office in April. Bandarepealed a restrictive media law andfostered a climate that led to a reduc-tion in instances of official censorshipand government intimidation, harass-ment, and violence against journalists.Peaceful demonstrations against President Mingu wa Mutharika and the DPP-majority government. In Blantyre, Malawi.(Travis Lupick)
  6. 6. ECUADOR NOT FREE Press Freedom Score 61eSTATE INTERFERENCE,HOSTILE ENVIRONMENTFOR THE PRESSEcuadorean President Rafael Correa (R) attends a news conference after a court session in Quito, January 24, 2012. Correasued editorial page editor Emilio Palacio and the owners of the newspaper El Universo for libel. (REUTERS/Guillermo Granja)Ecuador’s score dropped from 58to 61, and its status declined fromPartly Free to Not Free, due to gov-ernment-sponsored regulations thatseverely restricted the press’s ability toreport on politics ahead of the February2013 presidential election, as well asPresident Rafael Correa’s directive towithdraw government advertising fromprivately owned media that are criti-cal of the government, and a generalreduction in political and investigativereporting due to an increasingly hostileenvironment for the press created bythe Correa government.
  7. 7. EGYPT NOT FREE Press Freedom Score 62eVIOLENCE, INTIMIDATION,STATE INTERFERENCEIn Egypt, the score declined from 57 to62, and the status declined from PartlyFree to Not Free, as a result of increas-ing violence against and harassment ofjournalists, and the adoption of a newconstitution in December that, whileenshrining the right to freedom of thepress, allows for limitations based onsocial, cultural, and political grounds.In addition, the judiciary has ruledagainst journalists in several cases, andthe Egyptian media have become muchmore polarized since President Mo-hamed Morsi’s election in June.Supporters of television presenter Tawfiq Okasha, who is also the owner of Egyptian television channel Al-Faraeen, shoutslogans against Egypt’s President Mohamed Morsi and the Muslim Brotherhood during Okasha’s trial in Cairo on October 3,2012. Okasha was sent to a criminal court on accusations of inciting people to kill Morsi and insulting him. The prosecutorordered that the channel be taken off air. Okasha had said in one of his talk shows that Morsi and his group “deserve to getkilled.” The words on the sign on left read: “Freedom of the press and opinion and pen.” (REUTERS/Amr Abdallah Dalsh)
  8. 8. THAILAND NOT FREE Press Freedom Score 62eRESTRICTION OFFREE SPEECHThailand moved from 60 to 62 points,and fell from Partly Free to Not Free,due to a continuing trend of aggres-sive enforcement of lèse-majesté laws,which restrict speech deemed offen-sive to the monarchy. Court decisionsin 2012 found that the existing lawsdo not contradict the constitution’sprovisions for freedom of expression,and that third-party hosts may be heldliable for online lèse-majesté violations.Harsh penalties continued to be hand-ed down during the year, and even con-victions coupled with relatively lenientsentences threatened to encourageself-censorship.Chiranuch Premchaiporn, director of Prachatai news website, arrives at a court hearing for her verdict in a computer crimecase in Bangkok, April 30, 2012. Chiranuch was accused of failing to delete anti-monarchy postings that were deemedoffensive under Thailand’s strict lese-majeste laws fast enough on Prachatai’s webboard. (REUTERS/Sukree Sukplang)
  9. 9. BURMA NOT FREE Press Freedom Score 72eRELEASE OF IMPRISONEDJOURNALISTS,CENSORSHIP DECLINEImpressive gains were recorded inBurma, which improved from 85 to 72points due to the release of imprisonedbloggers and journalists, an end toofficial prepublication censorship anddissolution of the censorship body, areduction in violence against journal-ists, improved access for the foreignmedia, and greater access to foreignradio broadcasts and the internet. How-ever, restrictions remained on ethnicminority journalists and coverage ofethnic violence in Rakhine State.A journalist wearing a T-shirt reading ‘Stop killing press’ as he waits outside a court for a ruling on a defamation caseagainst The Voice Weekly in Yangon. The chief editor and publisher of The Voice Weekly were charged with defamation onSeptember 20 for reporting a graft probe into a government ministry. (Soe Than WIN/AFP/GettyImages)
  10. 10. CÔTE D’IVOIRE NOT FREE Press Freedom Score 61eDECLINE IN LEGALRESTRICTIONS,OPENING OF AIRWAVESCôte d’Ivoire’s score improved from 70to 61 due to the generally less restric-tive legal and political environmentfor the press under the new govern-ment of Alassane Ouattara, includinga decrease in harassment and attackson foreign and local journalists, morespace for critical reporting, and theopening up of radio and television air-waves to private broadcasters.The front page of a newspaper, featuring the arrest of Ivorian political leader Charles Ble Goude, is seen in Abidjan onJanuary 18, 2013. (REUTERS/Thierry Gouegnon)
  11. 11. AFGHANISTAN NOT FREE Press Freedom Score 67NEW PRIVATE OUTLETS,MORE INDEPENDENTREPORTINGIn Afghanistan a continuing decrease inviolence against journalists, the open-ing of a number of new private mediaoutlets that are free to criticize thegovernment, and a decline in officialcensorship and prosecutions of journal-ists caused the score to improve from74 to 67.eA man buys Ensaf newspaper at a kiosk in Kabul on May 22, 2012. (REUTERS/Mohammad Ismail)

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