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The academic job, steve mc kay, third sector research centre phd workshop

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The academic job, steve mc kay, third sector research centre phd workshop

  1. 1. The academic job:application and interview Stephen McKay October 5, 2012 Stephen McKay The academic job: application and interview
  2. 2. Finding a job Mostly advertised on jobs.ac.uk. These, plus a few extra, on jiscmail.ac.uk lists (social-policy, VSSN). The ‘grapevine’ may provide advance notice (supervisor, own department, conferences, new large grants . . . ). Can you get named on a grant application? Research assistant/associate/fellow; teaching fellow; lecturer. Consider sources of ‘post-doc’ funding (ESRC Future leaders, Axa, ERC). Stephen McKay The academic job: application and interview
  3. 3. The application Usually a CV and covering letter. There is no need to shorten the CV to fit a particular number of pages—more is more (within reason). Use the covering letter to set out how you meet the essential criteria. You may be up against 40 others (fixed term researcher) or 60 others (lecturer, UK focus) or 100+ others (international market like economics and politics). For jobs starting before October 2013, REF is king. Afterwards, may be a little more flexibility. Lecturer: outputs, income generation (potential), teaching, administration, citizenship. May be held to higher standard than existing staff. Stephen McKay The academic job: application and interview
  4. 4. The assessment If called for interview: probably down to last 6, or better. Usually a presentation, either to panel or department. Often will request written work (PhD chapter, draft article). Rarely, some kind of test (research skills). Stephen McKay The academic job: application and interview
  5. 5. The interview itself Probably more interviewers than you’d expect. Questions are not too hard to predict. Why do you want this job? Summarise you PhD in N minutes. Substantive questions on the topic. Research skills (researcher posts in particular). Writing skills and approach. Teaching and administrative experience. Last—do you have any questions? Usually : all get the same questions, there is a ‘score’ for particular elements. A PhD may only prepare you for an academic career, but an academic post is nothing like a PhD. Stephen McKay The academic job: application and interview

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