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5G - Tech to business case

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Presented by Dan Warren, Head of 5G Research, Samsung at Wi-Fi Global Congress, London, May 2017
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5G - Tech to business case

  1. 1. 5G - Tech to business case Dan Warren, Head of 5G Research, Samsung
  2. 2. New for 5G – Air interface 2 UE New Air Interface CP-OFDM – to introduce flexibility in OFDM and mitigate Inter Symbol Interference Massive MIMO – large numbers of bearers to increase bandwidth between Tx and Rx mmWave – provides access to broad frequency bands for higher bandwidths Beam Forming – extends range/cell size for mmWave bands Shortened TTI – reduces latency Flexibility in band sizing – allows previously unavailable bands to be used
  3. 3. New for 5G – RAN architecture extensions 3 UE Other RAN innovations CoMP – UE attached to multiple cells to provide greater reliability Small cell support – greater indoor coverage, increased cell density, self-backhauling 5G-NR in unlicensed bands – extension of mobile ecosystem Session mgmt split from mobility mgmt – enabler for RAN slicing D2D, V2X – devices connecting directly, with no network
  4. 4. (not so) New for 5G – topology flexibility 4 UE ‘Softwarisation’ of the network C-RAN – removal of functionality from cell sites to consolidation point in the network MEC (RAN, CN) MEC (RAN, CN) MEC (RAN, CN) MEC (RAN, CN) MEC (RAN, CN) C-RAN CN, Policy VNF (V)PDG Transport VNF NFV and SDN – enabling flexibility in where functions are deployed and scaled MEC – pushing Core Network functions and content ingress to cell sites Broadcast optimisation – further enhancements beyond MBMS
  5. 5. Meeting the goals 5 Massive-MIMO CP-OFDM BeamForming ShortenedTTI FlexibleBandSizing CoMP SmallCell 5G-NRinUnlicensed Session/Mobilitysplit NFV/SDN C-RAN MEC 10x bandwidth per connection Low-ms latency Five 9’s reliability 100% coverage >10x connections 50Mbps /connection everywhere 1000x bandwidth/area 10 year battery life Helps Hinders Enablers for network slicing Significant network investment required Achieving these requirements is dependent upon Operators deploying cells and resiliency methods to provide extended coverage and network capacity, as well as upgrading backhaul Reduction in TCO
  6. 6. Sliced to abstraction? 6 • Slice per topological implementation and/or required SLA • ‘low latency’ slice with MEC and short TTI; ‘traditional’ slice for consumer services; ‘Small cell slice’ for in- building coverage; ‘CoMP slice’ for managing co-ordinating cell; ‘low bandwidth’ slice for sensors… • Slice per Enterprise customer type; sub-slices per enterprise customer • Offering varying degrees of control to the customer – anything from fully managed service to connectivity and access to Radio. • Slice per MVNO • Each MVNO may then offer sub-slices on the above basis to their own enterprise customers… • An enterprise might require some high bandwidth, some low latency, some in-building and some ‘traditional’ connectivity, all within one service and with a degree of control that they own. • Multiple slices, maybe from multiple operators, maybe using multiple technologies – a slice of 5G, plus a slice of fixed access and a slice of WiFi, all backhauled over a slice of transport network. • As good as the business model from offering 5G (or any other) Network Slices may be, there may be a better one in ‘Network Splicing’ – stitching disparate network slices into a single commercial proposition. • This is the domain of System Integrators today, not Operators
  7. 7. Enterprise Customer Data Centre Apps Orchestration Enterprise Customer Data Centre Apps Orchestration Pain points for commercial slicing UE MEC (RAN, CN) MEC (RAN, CN) MEC (RAN, CN) MEC (RAN, CN) MEC (RAN, CN) C-RAN CN, Policy VNF (V)PDG Transport VNF Orchestration Layer RAN Orchestration CN Orchestration Transport Orchestration Enterprise Customer (or SI) Data Centre Apps Orchestration (Network Splicing) CN, Policy VNF CN, Policy VNF CN, Policy VNF 2G, 3G, 4G Slice NB-IoT, LTE-M slice Wi-Fi Slice Fixed Line Slice VNF vCPE Inter-orchestration system interface One (or more) 5G slice per enterprise customer Potentially multiple other network slices per network customer
  8. 8. Why are we doing all this? Requirements • 10x bandwidth per connection • Low-ms latency • Five 9’s reliability • 100% coverage • >10x connections • 50Mbps per connection everywhere • 1000x bandwidth/area • 10 year battery life • Reduction in TCO Applications • eMBB • Connected vehicles • AR/VR • S-UHD/3D Video • Haptics/Sensing • Massive IoT • Remote machine control • Mission critical services • Fixed-wireless access • … Customer segments • Consumer • Auto industry • Health • Industry 4.0 • Agriculture • Smart City/Public sector • Smart building • Utilities • Education • Transport • … MNO biz model • B2C • B2B • B2B2C The MNO is the first ‘B’ These are the second ‘B’
  9. 9. Customer segments • Consumer • Auto industry • Health • Industry 4.0 • Agriculture • Smart City/Public sector • Smart building • Utilities • Education • Transport • … B2B engagement brings different expectations The positive business impacts Big contracts, lots of connections Addressing previously untapped markets New revenue streams The implications Contractual SLA’s that must be met Significant penalties for failure to deliver Commercial and reputational damage if an SLA is breached or contract is lost Requirements • 10x bandwidth per connection • Low-ms latency • Five 9’s reliability • 100% coverage • >10x connections • 50Mbps per connection everywhere • More cells • 1000x bandwidth Some ‘Requirements’ become ‘Contractual Obligations’ Significant CapEx and OpEx to deliver and maintain these metrics Significant penalties incurred with failure to deliver and maintain
  10. 10. 5G meets all requirements - implications Requirements • 10x bandwidth per connection • Low-ms latency • Five 9’s reliability • 100% coverage • >10x connections • 50Mbps per connection everywhere • More cells • 1000x bandwidth The positive message… Bandwidth is no longer an application limitation Coverage is no longer a limitation Reliability and availability is assured The competitive implication Bandwidth is no longer a differentiator Coverage is no longer a differentiator Reliability and availability are no longer differentiators So, how will operators differentiate themselves from one another?
  11. 11. The relationship between the first or second ‘B’ In B2B or B2B2C business models, the first B’s price is one of the second B’s cost The second B wants a service from the first B at as low cost as it can get If the second B has a choice of equivalent offers, it will cause the competing first Bs to compete on price
  12. 12. Beyond the hype… What is 5G’s business motivation? Is it delivering high availability, high coverage, low latency (and sometimes high bandwidth) connections to enable parallel industry opportunities to be addressed? Or is it enhanced mobile broadband for consumers? Or both? Competitive advantages Early 5G launches will still deliver technical advances that offer MNOs differentiation on basis of connection bandwidth, latency, coverage, reliability, availability… • End game 1 – all operators meet all 5G requirements, thus no differentiation other than on basis of price • End game 2 – operators do not meet 5G requirements and still have scope to differentiate, but then are not meeting the hype of 5G today Either way, they are going to spend a lot of money getting there… … and consumers are likely to be first to benefit.
  13. 13. Thank Youdan.warren@samsung.com @tmgb

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