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George konstantakis iot and product design

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The Internet of Things (IoT) may be at the core of the next Industrial Revolution! The socioeconomic implications of IoT, in general, are astounding. As with all disruptive technology, there are threats and opportunities that must be understood by business leaders. How do these implications relate to the needs of manufacturing businesses and the human resources that are intertwined with them? How can Product Design address those needs? This closing session will explore these questions and offer solutions.

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George konstantakis iot and product design

  1. 1. Internet of Things & Product Design George Konstantakis Brooks Stevens Inc www.360mn.org
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  4. 4. -Brooks Stevens started firm in 1934. He personified Innovation… in his words “I am a business man, engineer and designer… in that order” Benefits: -80 YEARS OF IMMERSION in our clients’ businesses -Many universally recognizable 1st … First SUV, MILLER HIGH LIFE, AERODYNAMIC WEINER 3
  5. 5. Streamlined innovation process means DIRECT CONTROL • Quicker time to market • Less development cost • Higher profitability • Sustainable growth 4
  6. 6. Benefits of diverse experience: -PRODUCT-CENTRIC DIVERSE THINKING… grounded in the “MAKER’S CULTURE” of the Midwest, while applying design thinking gleaned from “POPULAR CULTURE” in other industries. -Make CONNECTIONS that are not obvious -NO BOUNDARIES 5
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  8. 8. From our experience… different people within different organizations define Innovation differently… Fundamentals that we need to start… • Common definition of Innovation • Process that delivers on that definition 7
  9. 9. • THERE ARE THREE FUNDAMENTAL ELEMENTS that contribute to innovative products and flawless execution every time… • Desirability, Viability, Feasibility • Click • Emotional Innovation may impact… • Brand Identity – connection to design language through visually differentiating queues • Defined by the union of a company’s business requirements for viability (selling price, margin, # warranty hits, market segment, new application) and the requirements of the people who will interact with the output of that business (ease of use, feels good, looks good, makes me happy) • Functional Innovation may impact • Ergonomics – a hand control that fits 15th – 95th percentile operators in multiple end-product uses. 20% decrease in fatigue. • User Interface – don’t need to read instructions any more… Touch screen interface is intuitive, deep and fast. • Defined by union of advancement in technology to make applications feasible (OLED, gorilla glass, nanotech) and people requirements • Process Innovation may impact • Quality – going from metal to plastic decreased warranty hits. • Productivity – robotic automation of low-skill tasks. 8
  10. 10. • Click • DESIGN INNOVATION • Balancing the latent desires of the end users, Business goals, and available technology to advance your Strategic OBJECTIVES • May mean re-focusing on other market segments, breaking away from your own existing core technology competency, finding other users. 8
  11. 11. • DESIGN IS ABOUT PEOPLE • People represented here are ADVOCATES and STAKEHOLDERS • Click • In the end, Design Thinking is all about satisfying unmet, unspoken, unarticulated… end user needs. 9
  12. 12. • Ask audience… What does innovation mean to you? • Click • Our definition of Innovation is…. • Every word in this definition is necessary in order for the definition to “work”. Take any one of them away, and you don’t have innovation according to my definition. • Economic can mean cash, equity, infrastructure, jobs • Customer is a stakeholder… an end user, service technician, machine operator. • Taken to market… must be commercialized. Ideas in and of themselves are important in education and intelectual development, but they don’t define innovation. • Click • “New” can be features in an existing product… or can be a totally new market-creating breakthrough. Incremental vs. Transformational 10
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  14. 14. Generally accepted that “Internet of Things” was coined by Kevin Ashton while an employee of Proctor and Gamble in 1999. From his website: “The fact that I was probably the first person to say “Internet of Things” doesn’t give me any right to control how others use the phrase. But what I meant, and still mean, is this: Today computers—and, therefore, the Internet—are almost wholly dependent on human beings for information. Nearly all of the roughly 50 petabytes (a petabyte is 1,024 terabytes) of data available on the Internet were first captured and created by human beings—by typing, pressing a record button, taking a digital picture or scanning a bar code. Conventional diagrams of the Internet include servers and routers and so on, but they leave out the most numerous and important routers of all: people. The problem is, people have limited time, attention and accuracy—all of which means they are not very good at capturing data about things in the real world.” 12
  15. 15. What’s the Internet of Things? • Sensors and Meters • An ever-growing network of physical objects that feature an IP address for internet connectivity • Communication between objects and other Internet-enabled systems • An extension of Machine-to-Machine (M2M) technologies • What IoT will mean is that every day objects, ones that we interact with regularly, will be capable of ‘talking’ to each other. Humans will fall more and more out of the loop. Machines will be talking to machines, objects talking to objects. (Skynet anyone?) 13
  16. 16. Infrastructural • Debate on whether point-to-point fiber, celllular and wireless current and planned infrastructure will support the 30+ billion IP addresses projected for 2020. • IPV6 has expanded the number of IP addresses to 3.4×10^38 essentially allowing anything that we can conceive of on the planet (and beyond) to be controlled. Socio-Political • Governments worldwide are backing the development of IoT initiatives. Establishing regulations, and smart systems (traffic, tollways, cameras everywhere) • New business opportunities of products and services along side elimination of existing business models. • Globally, the Millennial Generation age range in 2014 is from 10 to 37 years old. Some of the World leaders who will emerge in the next 5 years are all about transparency, authenticity and human experience. Engaging this demographic in the business of IoT is essential. • Millennials in the U.S. represent $200B in annual buying power… Largest ever!. They don’t value the “things” that prior generations did (cars, home ownership). They value their smart phones, social media, and personal 14
  17. 17. experiences. Human: • Privacy doesn’t seem to be as valuable to us when it comes to sharing on social media sites. But are we willing to risk all of our personal information, safety and security? 14
  18. 18. Economic theorist and author Jeremy Rifkin explains his concept of The Internet of Things. Rifkin's latest book is The Zero Marginal Cost Society: The Internet of Things, the Collaborative Commons, and the Eclipse of Capitalism (http://goo.gl/4estV2). • Marginal Cost = incremental cost of an additional good or service after fixed costs (overhead) are covered. Societal Economic platforms contain 3 elements: Communication, Energy, Mobility • 1800’s and early industrial revolution: steam power, printing presses, locomotive network • Many people were at work producing the presses, steam generators and engines for locomotives, and of course the rail network. Every news paper that is printed cost an incremental amount to produce. Likewise, people paid for every newspaper that is purchased. • 1900’s: oil + internal combustion engine, telephone, centralized electricity • Likewise… development costs for creating infrastructure, telephone and electric grids. Incremental cost for every phone line and handset. 15
  19. 19. Every call costs the producers incrementally, and those costs are passed through + profit to consumers. • 2000’s: renewable energy, communications internet, driverless automated drones = IoT • Low skill jobs are increasingly being replaced by automation. If it can be programmed, it can be automated. • Communication Internet is converging with the Energy Internet and Logistics and Transport Internet through use of sensors. 13 billion sensors now… 30 billion by 2020. Internet has passed into physical world… IoT. • 3D Printing is a subset of the Logistics and Transport Internet. • Millions of consumers become pro-sumers (production consumers) for [almost] free. News, digital media (music, applications, etc.), etc. We all have equal access and can become pro-sumers of IoT. Won’t be rocket science. Apps will be preprogrammed. The organizations that produce the apps get the big data. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3xOK2aJ-0Js 15
  20. 20. Threats: Security Protocol • Examples of successful attacks on drones are already on record. In 2009, insurgents in the Middle East intercepted Predator drone signals due to a failure to use secure protocols, according to Cabetas. This enabled the insurgents to spy on what the Predators were spying on (via airborne video). Without secure protocols, similar attacks are possible with domestic UAVs. • Texas A&M college students, by invitation of Homeland Security spoofed the University drone's GPS signals, insinuating the errant location data into navigation computers, resulting in the drone's untimely collision. • In a study spanning two years, [a security analysis company was asked to test a hospitals security system] • found drug infusion pumps–for delivering morphine drips, chemotherapy and antibiotics–that can be remotely manipulated to change the dosage doled out to patients; • Bluetooth-enabled defibrillators that can be manipulated to deliver random shocks to a patient’s heart or prevent a medically needed shock from occurring; • X-rays that can be accessed by outsiders lurking on a hospital’s network; 16
  21. 21. • temperature settings on refrigerators storing blood and drugs that can be reset, causing spoilage; • digital medical records that can be altered to cause physicians to misdiagnose, prescribe the wrong drugs or administer unwarranted care. 16
  22. 22. Jimmy Fallon w/ Robot • 70 percent of today’s occupations will likewise be replaced by automation by the end of this century. • Look at transformation between farming economy and today… People evolve into jobs that require creativity and unique solutions… But eventually those too may be replaced by automation. • In a very real way our inventions assign us our jobs. Each successful bit of automation generates new occupations—occupations we would not have fantasized about without the prompting of the automation. Threats: Jobs [Mfg specific examples] • Already… welding, sanding, grinding, hole punching, assembly… all replaced by robots • On the way to disappearing… tool path creation [programming]. From 3D CAD directly to 3D printed part or 3D tooling for mass production. • Automated bots are writing blogs by using stats, names and key facts and wordsmithing content! 17
  23. 23. Opportunities: Security Protocol • DNA-based cryptography - being used because of its vast parallelism, energy efficiency and the amount of information that the DNA can store. • encryption, authentication, signature, and various other applications in cryptography. • In one of the approaches DNA based cryptography itself is used to encrypt and decrypt the message. • And in another approach DNA strands are used to generate key for encryption and decryption. • Biological issues and cryptography computing difficulties provide a double security safeguards for the two schemes and makes it difficult for intrusion. • Can people be put in the middle (ie used as routers) using unique biometrics to prevent hacking into networks? • Performance / Condition Monitoring – detect imminent failure of a gear drive by using accelerometers or torque sensors to detect anomalies and replace ready-to-fail systems before catastrophic failure. Jobs 18
  24. 24. • Creative design and User Experience opportunities for Millennials. • Don’t underestimate the work required, or the new skill sets needed, to effectively gather, analyze, and make maximum use of the flood of IoT data that will be generated by a multitude of intelligent devices. The ability to isolate, analyze, and interpret this key data will be at the core of manufacturing competitiveness in an IoT world. It can often be more productive for companies to focus on carefully selected key elements and then dive deeply, rather than try to analyze everything at once. • Mobile applications development • Wearable / Implantable gadgets 18
  25. 25. Human Connections: • People will need other means of detecting “alerts” or data “messages” other than a buzz or beep on the iPhone. Wearable devices. • People will be able to control their own robots anywhere (space, sea, home… avatars). Imagine being able to control your camera on Philae! • Open source analytics and control algorithms… Programmers will be able to login to machines, analyze data, and present options for refining control based on that data… enabling AI. A steward (probably machine) will monitor those changes and allow (or disallow) them. Images: • Google Glass • Wearable Drone w/ camera • Base layers with sensors • Motion Capture • Ring that uses thermal energy to generate electricity 19
  26. 26. Telepresence refers to a set of technologies which allow a person to feel as if they were present, to give the appearance of being present, or to have an effect, via telerobotics, at a place other than their true location. 20
  27. 27. 1. You just walked out the door without your keys in your pocket. *Beep Beep*. Your smart-door delays locking the door for 30 seconds because you just left without your keys, giving you the chance to duck back inside if need be. 2. You’ve got a family history of heart disease. So much so that your GP recommends that you get an unobtrusive, internal heart monitor implanted into your arm. It’s inserted with a larger-than-you’d-like needle, and is powered by your body’s own thermal energy. It constantly monitors your heart rhythm and detects even the smallest arrhythmias. Any alarming changes and it sends a text message to your phone: “This is your heart. Please proceed to a hospital immediately.” 3. You’ve had your friends over for a dinner party, and of course set the mood with a few candles around the living room. A few too many wines later, your guests have left, and you’re off to bed. One of the candles flickers onto the curtains and they go up in flames. The smoke sets off your smoke alarm but you’re a heavy sleeper to begin with, and that third glass of wine means you’re not hearing the alarm. Never fear, your smoke alarm sends out a message to the motion detectors throughout your house. They notice the alarm is going off, but there is no movement in the house. They send a message back to the smoke detector, which sends a signal to the local fire bridge, and out they come! 4. You’re walking down the supermarket aisle, and you get to the milk fridge. 21
  28. 28. Your shopping trolley vibrates, and the screen mounted on the trolley handles displays a message: “There is no milk in your fridge. Would you like to purchase some?” Your fridge has identified that the teenager residing in your house has drunk the 2L milk bottle you bought 2 days ago. The fridge has sent a message to your phone. Your phone knows that you’re in the supermarket and has told your trolley. Your trolley knows you’re next to the milk fridge and has told you that you’re out of milk. So, you buy milk, and 50 other groceries. This is going to take a while to check out, right? Wrong, you simply wheel your trolley out through the smart gates, instantly scanning all the products in your trolley and charging your credit card. You receive an email with the itemized receipt. 5. It’s 2025 and you’re stepping out of the office to hail a cab to your important business meeting. Of course, your Google Calendar automatically scanned your Gmail and uploaded an entry for your meeting to your phone. Your phone told your office that you were leaving. By the time you’re at the front door, your self- driving Google Cab has pulled up. You hop in and start to tell it where you want to go. Of course, it already knows. Oh, and by the way, your Google cab is free! It’s Autumn and you’ve heard that the snow season is lining up to be a cracker. Last weekend, you were browsing new ski jackets at the shops. You didn’t buy any of course; your old one is perfectly fine! You did try one on though. What’s really weird is that the five screens in your Google cab just happen to be playing adverts for the jacket. The jacket sent a cookie to your smart watch. The cookie knows that you tried the jacket on, but didn’t leave the store with it. Your smart watch tells your cab which then plays you the adverts for the entire cab ride. It’s real world re-targeting. Your cab is “Free” though. 6. You’re sitting in a queue of 50 cars at an intersection. You can see the traffic lights ahead. They turn green and you think “Go go go! We can all make it through if we try!” To your horror, four cars make it through before the lights turn red. What if all the cars on the road could talk to each other, and better yet, talk to the traffic lights themselves? Completely optimized and efficient traffic lights. Better yet, the greater traffic system could be talking to all cars on the road everywhere, spreading out traffic via different routes based on congestion and wait times. 7. You’re a M.A.M.I.L. – a middle aged man in Lyrca. You’re out for your easy 100km Sunday morning ride, and you’re about 30km from home. It was raining the night before and the roads are slick. You take a corner a little too fast and your bike slips out from under you. You fall, hard. You’ve hit your head, you’re unconscious and you’re by yourself, 30km from home. 21
  29. 29. The accelerometer in your helmet has detected that you’ve hit your head. Your helmet ‘calls out’ to see if your bike is near by (it is) and if it’s moving (it’s not). Your bike sounds an emergency alarm for five seconds. If it’s not deactivated, your bike sends your exact location to an ambulance, and any other emergency contacts you’ve pre-listed. Your bike alarm continues to sound, attracting the attention of passers-by. It also sends out a signal to the road sign 1km down the road warning motorists to slow down. 8. Your coffee saucer is actually a tiny scale. You’re at the café, reading Business Insider. You finish your coffee and put down the cup. You get a pop up on your tablet: “Looks like you’ve finished your coffee. Another?” You click yes, and the barista is sent an order. Unfortunately, there isn’t any technology that can make ‘asking out the cute girl sitting at the next table’ any easier. Oh wait… maybe she’s on Tinder? 9. Your bed has an in-built sleep cycle monitor. Your new neighbours decided Thursday night was a great time to have a housewarming and play some obnoxious music until 3am. Your sleep was heavily interrupted. Your bed tells your alarm to give you an extra hour of sleep. Your alarm checks your schedule to see if you have any appointments first thing in the morning. You don’t, so it lets you sleep. 21
  30. 30. Innovation Sweet Spot = Human Experience 22
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  32. 32. “FAA Modernization and Reform Act” [related to UAV’s] - FAA “Building Smarter Manufacturing With The Internet of Things (IoT)” – Lopez Research “The Next Industrial Revolution: How the Internet of Things and Embedded, Connected, Intelligent Devices will Transform Manufacturing” – Frost & Sullivan www.iotweeklynews.com 24
  • yyatss

    Dec. 22, 2016

The Internet of Things (IoT) may be at the core of the next Industrial Revolution! The socioeconomic implications of IoT, in general, are astounding. As with all disruptive technology, there are threats and opportunities that must be understood by business leaders. How do these implications relate to the needs of manufacturing businesses and the human resources that are intertwined with them? How can Product Design address those needs? This closing session will explore these questions and offer solutions.

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