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Another critique of human societal restrictions on
the nature-loving human spirit, this poem is less
harsh and more playfu...
THE SCHOOL BOY
"The School-Boy" is a six-stanza poem of
five lines each. Each stanza follows an
ABABB rhyme scheme, with the first two
st...
Blake suggests that the educational system of his
day destroys the joyful innocence of youth; Blake
himself was largely se...
William Blake (28 November 1757 – 12 August 1827)
was an English poet, painter, and printmaker. Largely
unrecognized durin...
imagination as "the body of God", or
"Human existence itself".
Considered mad by contemporaries
for his idiosyncratic view...
England – indeed, to all forms of organized religion –
Blake was influenced by the ideals and ambitions of
the French and ...
The school boy (poem)
The school boy (poem)
The school boy (poem)
The school boy (poem)
The school boy (poem)
The school boy (poem)
The school boy (poem)
The school boy (poem)
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The school boy (poem)

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class 8 (english)

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The school boy (poem)

  1. 1. Another critique of human societal restrictions on the nature-loving human spirit, this poem is less harsh and more playful than most of Blake’s other such works. The boy loves “to rise in a summer morn, /when the birds sing on every tree.” He enjoys nature in its entire splendor, “But to go to school in a summer morn, /O! It drives all joy away.” The boy longs for the freedom of the outdoors and cannot “take delight” in his book. He asks, “How can the birds that is born for joy, /Sit in a cage and sing.” His youth and innocence are suited to playing in the summertime fields, not to sitting captive to a dreary educational system.
  2. 2. THE SCHOOL BOY
  3. 3. "The School-Boy" is a six-stanza poem of five lines each. Each stanza follows an ABABB rhyme scheme, with the first two stanzas using the same word "morn" to rhyme in the first lines. The repetition of the word “morn” as well as similarly low- sounding words such as "outworn," "bower," "dismay," and "destroy" lend the poem a bleak tone in keeping with the school-boy's attitude at being trapped inside at school rather than being allowed to move freely about the countryside on this fine summer day.
  4. 4. Blake suggests that the educational system of his day destroys the joyful innocence of youth; Blake himself was largely self-educated and did not endure the drudgery of the classroom as a child. Again, the poet wishes his readers to see the difference between the freedom of imagination offered by close contact with nature, and the repression of the soul caused by Reason’s demands for a so-called education.
  5. 5. William Blake (28 November 1757 – 12 August 1827) was an English poet, painter, and printmaker. Largely unrecognized during his lifetime, Blake is now considered a seminal figure in the history of both the poetry and visual arts of the Romantic Age. His prophetic poetry has been said to form "what is in proportion to its merits the least read body of poetry in the English language". His visual artistry has led one contemporary art critic to proclaim him "far and away the greatest artist Britain has ever produced". Although he lived in London his entire life except for three years spent in Felltham he produced a diverse and symbolically rich corpus, which embraced the
  6. 6. imagination as "the body of God", or "Human existence itself". Considered mad by contemporaries for his idiosyncratic views, Blake is held in high regard by later critics for his expressiveness and creativity, and for the philosophical and mystical undercurrents within his work. His paintings and poetry have been characterized as part of both the Romantic Movement and "Pre- Romantic", for its large appearance in the 18th century. Reverent of the Bible but hostile to the Church of
  7. 7. England – indeed, to all forms of organized religion – Blake was influenced by the ideals and ambitions of the French and American revolutions, as well as by such thinkers as Jacob Bohme and Emanuel Swedenborg. Despite these known influences, the singularity of Blake's work makes him difficult to classify. The 19th-century scholar William Rossetti characterized Blake as a "glorious luminary," and as "a man not forestalled by predecessors, or to be classed with contemporaries, or to be replaced by known or readily survivable successors".

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