Rolling in the dough funding your organization daffron1

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Rolling in the dough funding your organization daffron1

  1. 1. 1 - Get over your money issues “Infinite Underpants” by Rebecca Fine • "Do you think underpants grow on trees?" • “Underpants can't buy happiness." • "No matter how hard I try or what I do, I just NEVER have enough underpants."
  2. 2. 2 - Know where money is going • Track everything • If necessary, get an audit
  3. 3. 3 - Think like a business owner • Nonprofit does not mean no money • Business smarts can make the difference between continuing and shutting down • Understand overhead
  4. 4. 4 - Take care of your stuff • Don’t replace; maintain instead • Read manuals • Create a maintenance checklist
  5. 5. 5 - Freecycle and upcycle • Be creative with what you have • Craigslist and Freecycle lists can be sources of freebies • Take advantage of “weird” donated items http://www.aspcapro.org/blog/2013/01/wordless-wednesday-105/
  6. 6. 6 - Shop around • Particularly for pet meds and supplies • Try to shop locally when you can, but know that sometimes online prices are better • Get prescriptions from your vet so you can fill online
  7. 7. 7 - Work with the vet community • Work with vet schools • Get interns • Ask for deals, payment plans • Vets are NOT the enemy! • Be professional
  8. 8. 8 - Conserve energy • Turn of items not in use • Watch out for “ghost” drains on power
  9. 9. 9 - Use volunteer labor wisely • Know what volunteers are doing • Know what they are capable of doing • Try giving volunteers more responsibility
  10. 10. 10 - Get creative with design • Do black and white promos vs. color • Take money-saving advice from printers (“gang runs”) • Use the right printer for the project
  11. 11. 11 - Haunt thrift stores • If you have a thrift store or EBay shop and get donations, pay attention to what comes in • Visit other thrift stores for items you can use
  12. 12. 12 - Get animals adopted fast • Every day an animal is in rescue costs money • Run adoption promotions • Do off-site adoptions • Don’t end up with “forever fosters” that never get exposure
  13. 13. 13 - Partner with businesses • Share costs with co-op accounts • Share PR opportunities • Bring together people that normally wouldn’t know your organization exists
  14. 14. 14 - Make things • Grow catnip/cat grass • Create your own nontoxic cleaning supplies • Make cat/dog toys • Sell crafts • Find “crafty” people to help (quilt guilds)
  15. 15. 15 - Use pros in training • Grooming school students • Journalism student interns • Talk to design instructors about special projects
  16. 16. 16 - Barter and swap • Check out Craigslist • What do you have? • What do other people want?
  17. 17. 17 - Try "gleaning" • Usable food and supplies that stores have to throw away • Broken bags of dog food • Ask around
  18. 18. 18 - Shop for insurance • Get new quotes every year or so • Insurance can be an expensive line item in your budget!
  19. 19. 19 - Ask friends and donors • You don’t get what you don’t ask for • If you need something specific, send a letter or email to supporters • You never know who has connections
  20. 20. 20 - Shop off season • Plan ahead for supplies for fundraisers • For example, after Christmas stock up on discounted items for a SantaPaws event
  21. 21. 21 - Cut your debt • Interest costs a lot over time • Never assume “things will be better later” • Scrimp and save to remove debt overhead
  22. 22. 22 - Pay your bills on time • It should be obvious, but isn’t • Paying late incurs extra charges • Give yourself an allowance and stick to it • When money is gone, it’s gone Don’t stick your head in the sand about bills!
  23. 23. 23 - Don't take "just one more" • Every animal incurs costs • Know what you can handle and what you can’t • Spend less than you earn • Earn more than you spend
  24. 24. 24 - Look for hidden fees • Go through bank statements • Make sure you know what every charge is for • Look for “mysterious” fees and charges
  25. 25. 25 - Get pro-bono help • Lawyers, accountants, graphic artists sometimes will do pro-bono work, so ask! • Sometimes newbies want to enhance their portfolio (writing/design)
  26. 26. 26 - Try crowd sourcing projects • For a big initiative or project, try doing a specific ask • Consider online sites like Kickstarter and Greenfunder
  27. 27. 27 - Mail at the nonprofit rate • If you are a 501c3, you can mail at a lower rate • It’s free to get approved • Takes time for approval
  28. 28. 28 - Eliminate printing • Where can you cut printing costs? • Print newsletter? What about email? • How many of your supporters are online?
  29. 29. 29 - Use free online tools • Online software • Google docs, blogging tools, analytics, social media • Open source software • Photos (Gimp) • Audio (Audacity) • Office software (Open Office)
  30. 30. 30 - Solicit in-kind contributions • Create wish lists – include in web site and newsletters • Ask for what you want, so you don’t get what you don’t want • Sell or upcycle items that you can’t use directly
  31. 31. 31 - Network and share • Networking is free • Collaboration can cut costs • Share services (webmasters, copywriters) • Share facilities (office space, equipment, supplies)
  32. 32. 32 - Simplify events • Cut spending on events and galas • Consider simpler, lowercost events • “Because we’ve always done it that way” is not a good reason to continue
  33. 33. 33 - Hold contests • Contests can be incorporated into fundraising projects. • For example a photo contest for a calendar you sell • People love contests!
  34. 34. 34 - Save time • Time is money • Where do you waste time? • Make meetings matter (Or can you eliminate the meeting entirely?) • Have an agenda
  35. 35. 35 - Avoid “people problems” • Rescues are often destroyed by people problems • Huge emotional time sink • Hire slowly • Fire quickly
  36. 36. 36 - Learn how to use your tools • This is not 1989 “I’m not good with computers” doesn’t cut it anymore • Take classes • Learn shortcuts • Be efficient
  37. 37. 37 - Have a buffer • Put money aside for bad times. They will happen • Prepare now for future shortfalls • Run “what if” scenarios (“what if the shelter burned down?”)
  38. 38. 38 - Understand cash flow • Don’t spend all the money from the big yearly fundraiser • Know the difference between ongoing vs. episodic funding (ongoing=annual fund; episodic=grants/events) 90 80 70 60 50 40 30 20 10 0 1st Qtr 2nd Qtr 3rd Qtr 4th Qtr
  39. 39. 39 – Brainstorm income ideas • Look at easy low-cost ideas from Funds to the Rescue • Look at the ROI (return on investment) of everything • Even if you make a lot of money on an event, you may not make a lot of PROFIT
  40. 40. 40 - Diversify revenue • Don’t rely on one big event or one big donor • Putting all your eggs in one basket can be risky • Times change; people change. What worked before may not work now
  41. 41. 41 - Focus on your mission • Rescues are weakened when they stray from their primary mission • Don’t be distracted by non-mission activities
  42. 42. 42 - Consider outsourcing • Save time/money by outsourcing things you don’t do well • Outsource HR, payroll, admin, taxes • Time is money
  43. 43. 43 - Ponder merging • Merge with a similar or complementary organization • If you’re at risk of shutting down, it may be the best option • One bigger org can be more effective than two competing small ones
  44. 44. 44 - Negotiate everything • Always ask for nonprofit rate • Almost everything is negotiable • You never know unless you ask
  45. 45. 45 – Maximize your board • Have a “working board” • Board should help raise and save money • Take advantage of their contacts for donations, sponsors
  46. 46. 46 - Try low-cost marketing • Letters to the editor • Guest columns • PR is free; writing press releases is easy • Small local newspapers are desperate for “feel good” stories
  47. 47. 47 - Retain your people • Keep volunteers and staff happy • Training new people is expensive • Long-term employees have valuable knowledge
  48. 48. 48 - Cultivate existing donors • It’s easier to cultivate existing donors than to find new ones • Let them know you appreciate and need them • Tell stories that touch their hearts • Always say thank you
  49. 49. 49 - Stay in touch • Don’t forget about lapsed donors • Don’t delete them off your list! • Give them free ways to stay in touch (newsletter, Facebook)
  50. 50. 50 - Look for thriving biz • Some businesses are recession proof • Look for money where other orgs are not • Keep up with the business press to spot companies doing well (for example, in our town a microbrewery is doing great)
  51. 51. 51 - Reexamine projects • Now may not be the right time for big capital project • For example: New building may be great, but not feasible right now • Big projects can distract from your primary focus
  52. 52. 52 - Speak to spread the word • Speaking to civic clubs is free • Talk on topics business people are interested in (leadership, finding good help, partnering with nonprofits) • Don’t just beg for money; provide useful information
  53. 53. 53 - Get free PR • Negotiate with radio stations for PSAs/event promos • Consider non-peak times • Some time-slots may not cost anything
  54. 54. 54 - Participate in events • Piggyback on someone else’s event instead of doing your own • Have booths at community events • Demonstrations, puzzles, fun activities
  55. 55. 55 - Maximize your website • Do you have a donate button? • Can people sign up for your newsletter? • Do you have a wish list? • Is the site easy to read? • Can people tell what you actually do?
  56. 56. 56 - Renegotiate with creditors • If you’re desperate and may have to close down, talk to creditors • Some may be willing to accept as little as 40-60 cents on the dollar • They know some money is better than no money
  57. 57. 57 - Be creative! • This is the MOST important tip! • Know where you money is going, look at the things that cost the most • Find creative ways to lower or eliminate those costs
  58. 58. Now You… • Questions? Thoughts? • Where are you spending money? • What can you get for free? • Where can you reduce spending? BRAINSTORM!
  59. 59. Thank you for attending! For more information, visit our sites: • Logical Expressions, Inc: www.LogicalExpressions.com • NAPRP: www.NAPRP.com • Pet-related articles: www.pet-tails.com

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