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  • CONTEXT - describe the context(s) for your project. This includes a clear problem statement and what you hoped to achieve with design computationCONCEPTS/DESIGN TOOLS - describe the processes/concepts/tools that used or that you developed for your project. This should include the role that design computation played in your project.DRIVERS - describe the key drivers that you have considered in your design, highlighting challenges and tradeoffsRANGE - demonstrate the range of solutions generated by your design; in addition to illustrating tradeoffs, this may be a good way to detail the process that you have undertaken to overcome limitations or overdeterminacy.your DESIGN SOLUTION - provide the rationale for your final design choice. This may be the process you used, the construction method, demonstrating order of assembly. If appropriate, be prepared to give calculated performance of your system.
  • CONTEXT - describe the context(s) for your project. This includes a clear problem statement and what you hoped to achieve with design computationCONCEPTS/DESIGN TOOLS - describe the processes/concepts/tools that used or that you developed for your project. This should include the role that design computation played in your project.DRIVERS - describe the key drivers that you have considered in your design, highlighting challenges and tradeoffsRANGE - demonstrate the range of solutions generated by your design; in addition to illustrating tradeoffs, this may be a good way to detail the process that you have undertaken to overcome limitations or overdeterminacy.your DESIGN SOLUTION - provide the rationale for your final design choice. This may be the process you used, the construction method, demonstrating order of assembly. If appropriate, be prepared to give calculated performance of your system.
  • CONTEXT - describe the context(s) for your project. This includes a clear problem statement and what you hoped to achieve with design computationCONCEPTS/DESIGN TOOLS - describe the processes/concepts/tools that used or that you developed for your project. This should include the role that design computation played in your project.DRIVERS - describe the key drivers that you have considered in your design, highlighting challenges and tradeoffsRANGE - demonstrate the range of solutions generated by your design; in addition to illustrating tradeoffs, this may be a good way to detail the process that you have undertaken to overcome limitations or overdeterminacy.your DESIGN SOLUTION - provide the rationale for your final design choice. This may be the process you used, the construction method, demonstrating order of assembly. If appropriate, be prepared to give calculated performance of your system.
  • CONTEXT - describe the context(s) for your project. This includes a clear problem statement and what you hoped to achieve with design computationCONCEPTS/DESIGN TOOLS - describe the processes/concepts/tools that used or that you developed for your project. This should include the role that design computation played in your project.DRIVERS - describe the key drivers that you have considered in your design, highlighting challenges and tradeoffsRANGE - demonstrate the range of solutions generated by your design; in addition to illustrating tradeoffs, this may be a good way to detail the process that you have undertaken to overcome limitations or overdeterminacy.your DESIGN SOLUTION - provide the rationale for your final design choice. This may be the process you used, the construction method, demonstrating order of assembly. If appropriate, be prepared to give calculated performance of your system.
  • CONTEXT - describe the context(s) for your project. This includes a clear problem statement and what you hoped to achieve with design computationCONCEPTS/DESIGN TOOLS - describe the processes/concepts/tools that used or that you developed for your project. This should include the role that design computation played in your project.DRIVERS - describe the key drivers that you have considered in your design, highlighting challenges and tradeoffsRANGE - demonstrate the range of solutions generated by your design; in addition to illustrating tradeoffs, this may be a good way to detail the process that you have undertaken to overcome limitations or overdeterminacy.your DESIGN SOLUTION - provide the rationale for your final design choice. This may be the process you used, the construction method, demonstrating order of assembly. If appropriate, be prepared to give calculated performance of your system.
  • CONTEXT - describe the context(s) for your project. This includes a clear problem statement and what you hoped to achieve with design computationCONCEPTS/DESIGN TOOLS - describe the processes/concepts/tools that used or that you developed for your project. This should include the role that design computation played in your project.DRIVERS - describe the key drivers that you have considered in your design, highlighting challenges and tradeoffsRANGE - demonstrate the range of solutions generated by your design; in addition to illustrating tradeoffs, this may be a good way to detail the process that you have undertaken to overcome limitations or overdeterminacy.your DESIGN SOLUTION - provide the rationale for your final design choice. This may be the process you used, the construction method, demonstrating order of assembly. If appropriate, be prepared to give calculated performance of your system.
  • CONTEXT - describe the context(s) for your project. This includes a clear problem statement and what you hoped to achieve with design computationCONCEPTS/DESIGN TOOLS - describe the processes/concepts/tools that used or that you developed for your project. This should include the role that design computation played in your project.DRIVERS - describe the key drivers that you have considered in your design, highlighting challenges and tradeoffsRANGE - demonstrate the range of solutions generated by your design; in addition to illustrating tradeoffs, this may be a good way to detail the process that you have undertaken to overcome limitations or overdeterminacy.your DESIGN SOLUTION - provide the rationale for your final design choice. This may be the process you used, the construction method, demonstrating order of assembly. If appropriate, be prepared to give calculated performance of your system.
  • CONTEXT - describe the context(s) for your project. This includes a clear problem statement and what you hoped to achieve with design computationCONCEPTS/DESIGN TOOLS - describe the processes/concepts/tools that used or that you developed for your project. This should include the role that design computation played in your project.DRIVERS - describe the key drivers that you have considered in your design, highlighting challenges and tradeoffsRANGE - demonstrate the range of solutions generated by your design; in addition to illustrating tradeoffs, this may be a good way to detail the process that you have undertaken to overcome limitations or overdeterminacy.your DESIGN SOLUTION - provide the rationale for your final design choice. This may be the process you used, the construction method, demonstrating order of assembly. If appropriate, be prepared to give calculated performance of your system.
  • CONTEXT - describe the context(s) for your project. This includes a clear problem statement and what you hoped to achieve with design computationCONCEPTS/DESIGN TOOLS - describe the processes/concepts/tools that used or that you developed for your project. This should include the role that design computation played in your project.DRIVERS - describe the key drivers that you have considered in your design, highlighting challenges and tradeoffsRANGE - demonstrate the range of solutions generated by your design; in addition to illustrating tradeoffs, this may be a good way to detail the process that you have undertaken to overcome limitations or overdeterminacy.your DESIGN SOLUTION - provide the rationale for your final design choice. This may be the process you used, the construction method, demonstrating order of assembly. If appropriate, be prepared to give calculated performance of your system.
  • CONTEXT - describe the context(s) for your project. This includes a clear problem statement and what you hoped to achieve with design computationCONCEPTS/DESIGN TOOLS - describe the processes/concepts/tools that used or that you developed for your project. This should include the role that design computation played in your project.DRIVERS - describe the key drivers that you have considered in your design, highlighting challenges and tradeoffsRANGE - demonstrate the range of solutions generated by your design; in addition to illustrating tradeoffs, this may be a good way to detail the process that you have undertaken to overcome limitations or overdeterminacy.your DESIGN SOLUTION - provide the rationale for your final design choice. This may be the process you used, the construction method, demonstrating order of assembly. If appropriate, be prepared to give calculated performance of your system.
  • CONTEXT - describe the context(s) for your project. This includes a clear problem statement and what you hoped to achieve with design computationCONCEPTS/DESIGN TOOLS - describe the processes/concepts/tools that used or that you developed for your project. This should include the role that design computation played in your project.DRIVERS - describe the key drivers that you have considered in your design, highlighting challenges and tradeoffsRANGE - demonstrate the range of solutions generated by your design; in addition to illustrating tradeoffs, this may be a good way to detail the process that you have undertaken to overcome limitations or overdeterminacy.your DESIGN SOLUTION - provide the rationale for your final design choice. This may be the process you used, the construction method, demonstrating order of assembly. If appropriate, be prepared to give calculated performance of your system.
  • CONTEXT - describe the context(s) for your project. This includes a clear problem statement and what you hoped to achieve with design computationCONCEPTS/DESIGN TOOLS - describe the processes/concepts/tools that used or that you developed for your project. This should include the role that design computation played in your project.DRIVERS - describe the key drivers that you have considered in your design, highlighting challenges and tradeoffsRANGE - demonstrate the range of solutions generated by your design; in addition to illustrating tradeoffs, this may be a good way to detail the process that you have undertaken to overcome limitations or overdeterminacy.your DESIGN SOLUTION - provide the rationale for your final design choice. This may be the process you used, the construction method, demonstrating order of assembly. If appropriate, be prepared to give calculated performance of your system.
  • CONTEXT - describe the context(s) for your project. This includes a clear problem statement and what you hoped to achieve with design computationCONCEPTS/DESIGN TOOLS - describe the processes/concepts/tools that used or that you developed for your project. This should include the role that design computation played in your project.DRIVERS - describe the key drivers that you have considered in your design, highlighting challenges and tradeoffsRANGE - demonstrate the range of solutions generated by your design; in addition to illustrating tradeoffs, this may be a good way to detail the process that you have undertaken to overcome limitations or overdeterminacy.your DESIGN SOLUTION - provide the rationale for your final design choice. This may be the process you used, the construction method, demonstrating order of assembly. If appropriate, be prepared to give calculated performance of your system.
  • CONTEXT - describe the context(s) for your project. This includes a clear problem statement and what you hoped to achieve with design computationCONCEPTS/DESIGN TOOLS - describe the processes/concepts/tools that used or that you developed for your project. This should include the role that design computation played in your project.DRIVERS - describe the key drivers that you have considered in your design, highlighting challenges and tradeoffsRANGE - demonstrate the range of solutions generated by your design; in addition to illustrating tradeoffs, this may be a good way to detail the process that you have undertaken to overcome limitations or overdeterminacy.your DESIGN SOLUTION - provide the rationale for your final design choice. This may be the process you used, the construction method, demonstrating order of assembly. If appropriate, be prepared to give calculated performance of your system.
  • CONTEXT - describe the context(s) for your project. This includes a clear problem statement and what you hoped to achieve with design computationCONCEPTS/DESIGN TOOLS - describe the processes/concepts/tools that used or that you developed for your project. This should include the role that design computation played in your project.DRIVERS - describe the key drivers that you have considered in your design, highlighting challenges and tradeoffsRANGE - demonstrate the range of solutions generated by your design; in addition to illustrating tradeoffs, this may be a good way to detail the process that you have undertaken to overcome limitations or overdeterminacy.your DESIGN SOLUTION - provide the rationale for your final design choice. This may be the process you used, the construction method, demonstrating order of assembly. If appropriate, be prepared to give calculated performance of your system.
  • CONTEXT - describe the context(s) for your project. This includes a clear problem statement and what you hoped to achieve with design computationCONCEPTS/DESIGN TOOLS - describe the processes/concepts/tools that used or that you developed for your project. This should include the role that design computation played in your project.DRIVERS - describe the key drivers that you have considered in your design, highlighting challenges and tradeoffsRANGE - demonstrate the range of solutions generated by your design; in addition to illustrating tradeoffs, this may be a good way to detail the process that you have undertaken to overcome limitations or overdeterminacy.your DESIGN SOLUTION - provide the rationale for your final design choice. This may be the process you used, the construction method, demonstrating order of assembly. If appropriate, be prepared to give calculated performance of your system.
  • CONTEXT - describe the context(s) for your project. This includes a clear problem statement and what you hoped to achieve with design computationCONCEPTS/DESIGN TOOLS - describe the processes/concepts/tools that used or that you developed for your project. This should include the role that design computation played in your project.DRIVERS - describe the key drivers that you have considered in your design, highlighting challenges and tradeoffsRANGE - demonstrate the range of solutions generated by your design; in addition to illustrating tradeoffs, this may be a good way to detail the process that you have undertaken to overcome limitations or overdeterminacy.your DESIGN SOLUTION - provide the rationale for your final design choice. This may be the process you used, the construction method, demonstrating order of assembly. If appropriate, be prepared to give calculated performance of your system.
  • CONTEXT - describe the context(s) for your project. This includes a clear problem statement and what you hoped to achieve with design computationCONCEPTS/DESIGN TOOLS - describe the processes/concepts/tools that used or that you developed for your project. This should include the role that design computation played in your project.DRIVERS - describe the key drivers that you have considered in your design, highlighting challenges and tradeoffsRANGE - demonstrate the range of solutions generated by your design; in addition to illustrating tradeoffs, this may be a good way to detail the process that you have undertaken to overcome limitations or overdeterminacy.your DESIGN SOLUTION - provide the rationale for your final design choice. This may be the process you used, the construction method, demonstrating order of assembly. If appropriate, be prepared to give calculated performance of your system.
  • CONTEXT - describe the context(s) for your project. This includes a clear problem statement and what you hoped to achieve with design computationCONCEPTS/DESIGN TOOLS - describe the processes/concepts/tools that used or that you developed for your project. This should include the role that design computation played in your project.DRIVERS - describe the key drivers that you have considered in your design, highlighting challenges and tradeoffsRANGE - demonstrate the range of solutions generated by your design; in addition to illustrating tradeoffs, this may be a good way to detail the process that you have undertaken to overcome limitations or overdeterminacy.your DESIGN SOLUTION - provide the rationale for your final design choice. This may be the process you used, the construction method, demonstrating order of assembly. If appropriate, be prepared to give calculated performance of your system.
  • CONTEXT - describe the context(s) for your project. This includes a clear problem statement and what you hoped to achieve with design computationCONCEPTS/DESIGN TOOLS - describe the processes/concepts/tools that used or that you developed for your project. This should include the role that design computation played in your project.DRIVERS - describe the key drivers that you have considered in your design, highlighting challenges and tradeoffsRANGE - demonstrate the range of solutions generated by your design; in addition to illustrating tradeoffs, this may be a good way to detail the process that you have undertaken to overcome limitations or overdeterminacy.your DESIGN SOLUTION - provide the rationale for your final design choice. This may be the process you used, the construction method, demonstrating order of assembly. If appropriate, be prepared to give calculated performance of your system.
  • CONTEXT - describe the context(s) for your project. This includes a clear problem statement and what you hoped to achieve with design computationCONCEPTS/DESIGN TOOLS - describe the processes/concepts/tools that used or that you developed for your project. This should include the role that design computation played in your project.DRIVERS - describe the key drivers that you have considered in your design, highlighting challenges and tradeoffsRANGE - demonstrate the range of solutions generated by your design; in addition to illustrating tradeoffs, this may be a good way to detail the process that you have undertaken to overcome limitations or overdeterminacy.your DESIGN SOLUTION - provide the rationale for your final design choice. This may be the process you used, the construction method, demonstrating order of assembly. If appropriate, be prepared to give calculated performance of your system.
  • Final

    1. 1. Laura BrownDesign Computation Spring 2012
    2. 2. ContextHow are three dimensional forms represented on two-dimensionalsurfaces? Camera Obscura using light and mirror to project image onto drawing surface
    3. 3. Brunelleschi method of using string to literally form lines from a single pointthrough an object and onto a plane
    4. 4. Masolino, Saint Peter Heals a Cripple,1424-1425 Paolo Uccello, perspective drawing of a chalice, 1450
    5. 5. Newest addition to this cannon—3D modelingLike its predecessors, it is a system to describe objects in spaceLike, say, one-point perspective, it has its own language and inaccuracies
    6. 6. If computer rendering of 3D objects is another way ofprojecting three dimensions onto two, what characterizesthis strategy and the images it produces?With the computer’s 3D modeling we no longer strive torepresent an object on paper but on the screen.Already flattened representations evade the physicality ofobjects. Models in the computer exist outside thephysicality even of paper or canvas.As in the other examples listed, a revolution in howspace is represented is a revolution in how it is createdand perceived. The invention of perspective systems hadhuge affects on architecture and by proxy on culture ingeneral. The invention of modeling software has likewiseaffected the collective visual vocabulary through thetrends in architecture it has enabled.
    7. 7. Objects as the computer treats them—as pure math—asort of Platonic ideal? The perfect square that can neverexist? The infinitely thin surface?What if the natural biases of computer modeling areexploited?A few things come to mind for me: The idea of projection of an object onto the planarcomputer screen The possibility of objects that could never existoutside this specific context No longer are planar representations static—they canbe manipulated and re-built as pixels on our screens inreal time.
    8. 8. The goal:Create a system resulting in a set of objectswhich highlight/exploit the peculiaritiesspecific to the computer’s treatment andrepresentation of three-dimensional space.Compile them in some form that goesbeyond a folder on my desktop of objectfiles. Looking towards distributable media.
    9. 9. Systems for projectionHuman depth perception is dependent uponstereoscopic vision.In the computer, the view is from a singlecamera’s point of view—depth perception isdependent upon illusions created by shadingor forshortening (as in a drawing or painting)PLUS the added ability to move thingsaround with your mouse
    10. 10. A sphere floating over aplane? Or a series of bothcurved lines and straightlines on a plane?Here the same model was rotated a bit—the lines that looked like a tilted spherehave lost their depth. While the sphericalisocurves of a ball retain their 3Dinformation when rendered to our 2Dscreen, here they are projectedprogrammatically onto a plane in Rhino.Only when the plane of our viewport isparallel to the planar surface object inRhino does the projected image take ona spherical appearance
    11. 11. Projecting onto non-planar surfaces, taking advantage of the computer’s ability tohandle 3D forms that don’t make sense in real space:Two views of the same scene in Rhino. In the computer’s conception of the space,the topmost form is spherical (really curve objects which mimic isocurves), themiddle form consists of curves which all lie on the same plane, and thebottommost is the result of projecting the sphere not onto a planar surface but awarped one. From above, all three appear the same. We come out with curves thatoccupy all three of Rhino’s virtual dimensions but it is not at all what we startedwith.
    12. 12. Process so far 1. Create isocurves 1. Pick a surface/object to create isocurves 2. Depending on the object type, the script treats it differently to try to avoid error messages—for example weird things happen with extrusions 3. Evaluate a given surface at regular intervals in its U and V domains 4. Save the resulting coordinates in a nested list so that index values correspond to the points position on the surface 5. Connect the points—for each row of points, connect all the points 6. Do the same for columns.
    13. 13. Top and perspective views of setup 2. Project those curves onto another surface Script is built so that projection direction is parallel to the z axis [0,0,-1]. This m 1. Pick the curves to project 2. Pick the surface to project onto 3. Again some if:then statements to try to avoid error messages and account 4. Voila your curves have been projected
    14. 14. Curves have been projected onto the Move the original curves and sphere away to see the newsurface ones Top view—still looks like the top of a sphere
    15. 15. More process3. Make them occupy space Right now these curves are infinitely thin and don’t display very wellanywhere outside of Rhino. Curves are replaced by narrow tubular forms,technically circles extruded along the original curve. 1. Select the curves to make into tubes 2. For each curve, find the first endpoint 3. Also find the vector tangent to the curve at this point 4. Find the plane normal to this vector 5. Add a circle at this endpoint and orient it according to this normal plane, giving it an arbitrary radius. The default made sense for the scale I wasworking at but it is by no means written in stone. 6. Extrude the circle along the curve
    16. 16. Examples
    17. 17. Using facets instead of isocurvesIn this variation, the same points are evaluated on the surface of an object,but now instead of connecting them and projecting the resulting curve, weproject the points themselves and then use them to create surfaces. As thesurface is evaluated, for each point a class is instantiated. Each point’scoordinates are stored as well as three of its neighbors. Its X Y and Z valuesare translated into R G B values. The points are then projected onto asurfaces and the new coordinates are stored. The four stored points for eachinstance of the class are used to make a surface, which is then coloredaccording to the color that was calculated earlier. A cube projected onto an irregular surface using this method
    18. 18. Here, there is no projection at all, only random displacement along the z-axisof the surfaces. Because the individual surfaces are moved only up and down,not side to side, from above they appear to form a sphere. In reality they donot form a flush surface.
    19. 19. ShortcomingsSo many types of objects and surfaces, hard to make a script that will handlethem all nicelyDo I live with this limitation and just set up my objects in a way that the scriptcan handle, or do I spend time fixing the script but perhaps coming out withfewer satisfying results—horizontal vs vertical investigation?Assigning colors to the objects to create the illusion of depth/lighting ratherthan relying on scene lighting. The computer’s lighting sometimes gives awaythe fact that surfaces are not what they seem. Also, getting object color toexport has not worked for me yet.

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