Why They Run - School Research

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We conducted a survey in high schools in Chicago and Los Angeles to obtain general information about youths’ knowledge and access of services for runaway youth. We chose schools as a setting for two main reasons. First, schools provide access to almost all (high-school age) youth regardless of whether or not they have run away. Second, schools may be one of the best points of attack for getting information to runaways and potential runaways. In the interviews of shelter and street youth, few had obtained information from school; however, many of these youth cited school as a good potential focal point for distributing information.

This research is a follow-up to the original Why They Run report released in May 2010.

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Why They Run - School Research

  1. 1. Supplemental research to the May 2010 report, “Why They Run: An In- depth Look at America’s Runaway Youth” October 2010
  2. 2.  The National Runaway Switchboard has released supplemental research to the May 2010 report, Why They Run: An in-depth look at America’s runaway youth shedding further light on the runaway problem in America. This new research continues filling in the gaps of what is already known and what can be done based on new research.  The new research continues to drive dialogue among organizations that encourages collaboration on finding and implementing strategies that reverse the runaway trend. It further enables NRS and other social service organizations to explore ways of reaching youth that are real, relevant and capable of scaling the walls they have put up for protection and survival. 2 Supplemental research October 2010
  3. 3.  Researchers conducted a survey in high schools in Chicago and Los Angeles to obtain general information about youths’ knowledge and access of services for runaway youths. A total of 1,246 students were surveyed—963 in L.A., 283 in Chicago.* 3 Supplemental research October 2010 * More in depth information on the researchers methodology can be found within the research section of the NRS website at www.1800RUNAWAY.org.
  4. 4. The Key Findings 4
  5. 5.  Nearly two in five students had at sometime considered running away; nearly one quarter had considered it “somewhat” or “very” seriously.  Girls were more likely than boys to have considered running away (48 percent compared with 39 percent). Girls were more likely than boys to have considered running away “somewhat” or “very” seriously (27 percent compared with 18 percent).  Youth in step-families were the most likely to have considered running away “somewhat” or “very” seriously (33 percent), followed by youth in households without a biological parent (27 percent), youth in single-parent families (25 percent), and youth living with both biological parents (19 percent). 5 Supplemental research October 2010
  6. 6.  Although 16 percent of responding students had run away at some time, not all said they had ever thought about running away. Consistent with the interviews of youth in shelters and on the street, a sizable portion of runaway episodes may be unplanned spur of the moment decisions.1  Few youth with runaway experience or who have seriously considered running away have contacted a service intended to help runaways.  There appears to be a social network in schools among youth who have run away or have seriously considered running away. Ibid., p. 43 6 Supplemental research October 2010
  7. 7. 7 17.3 % 23 % 41 % 18.6 % before age 12 12 to 13 14 to 15 16 to 17 Supplemental research October 2010 Age of first runaway episode among youth subjects who had previously run.
  8. 8. 8 Supplemental research October 2010 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 1 2 3 to 5 6+ 38.7 % 23.8 % 23.3 % 14.3 % Number of runaway episodes among youth subjects who had previously run.
  9. 9.  Youth have little knowledge of services available to help runaway youth, even if they have past runaway experience or have seriously thought about running away.  However, youth with past runaway experience have more knowledge about available services than youth with no past runaway experience.  Less than one quarter of responding students say their school provides information on services available to help youth who have run away.  Students who say their school provides information are more informed about available services than other students. 9 Supplemental research October 2010
  10. 10. 10 If youth ran away, percent who know where to find… Supplemental research October 2010 free meal medical care shelter hotline at least one service Yes 13.5 8.7 8.5 3.7 21.8 free meal medical care shelter hotline at least one service With experience 19 13.7 15.4 5.9 32 Without experience 12.1 7.7 6.9 3.2 19.6 All youth Runaway experience
  11. 11. 11 Percent of students indicating their school provides information on help for runaway youth Supplemental research October 2010 0 5 10 15 20 25 School provides information Teacher provides in classroom Posted in school Teacher provides and is posted in school 23.1 9.9 10.6 4.4
  12. 12.  Youth turn primarily to friends for help if they feel they can’t talk to their parents.  Youth do not know about hotlines and would not call one if they were to run away; only 13 percent of youth who have seriously considered running away say they would call a hotline.  Youth wouldn’t call hotlines because they: ◦ don’t have the number ◦ don’t want to tell others their business ◦ wouldn’t want to be found ◦ have other help ◦ don’t trust hotlines ◦ don’t think they need help ◦ believe it would not do any good or that hotline staff would not understand their situation. 12 Supplemental research October 2010
  13. 13. 13 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 Talk to a friend Talk to another adult such as a relative or neighbor Search the internet Talk to a teacher or school counselor Talk to a friend's parents Talk to someone at church or other religious organization Call a hotline Go to a shelter Wouldn't tell anyone Other 74.3 38.7 28.6 28.2 19.6 17.1 5.6 4.1 2.5 5.3 What youth would do if they couldn't talk to parents and needed help. Supplemental research October 2010
  14. 14. For questions or comments on this research please contact Katy Walsh, Director of Development and Communication at the National Runaway Switchboard at kwalsh@1800RUNAWAY.org, or (773) 289-1727. Media interested in additional information or to schedule an interview with an NRS spokesperson, please contact Joel Kessel at joel@kesselcommunications.com, or (614) 467-9083. 14 Supplemental research October 2010

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