Barbara McClintock

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Stephen L. Glasior, Ph.D.
University of New Orleans
(Stephen Xootfly in SL)

"Career and Seminal Contributions to Genetics of Barbara McClintock"

Put on your "jumping jeans" (well in this case "jumping genes") and join us for the first talk of the Women in Science, Tech & Medicine. Stephen Xootfly will be lecturing on one of the few female Nobel laureates in the sciences, Barbara McClintock.

TODAY, Friday, February 11, 2011
5 PM SLT, Space Destiny
http://slurl.com/secondlife/Space%20Destiny/91/86/25

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  • Stephen L. Glasior, Ph.D.
    University of New Orleans
    (Stephen Xootfly in SL)

    'Career and Seminal Contributions to Genetics of Barbara McClintock'

    Put on your 'jumping jeans' (well in this case 'jumping genes') and join us for the first talk of the Women in Science, Tech & Medicine. Stephen Xootfly will be lecturing on one of the few female Nobel laureates in the sciences, Barbara McClintock.

    TODAY, Friday, February 11, 2011
    5 PM SLT, Space Destiny
    http://slurl.com/secondlife/Space%20Destiny/91/86/25

    Published on Slideshare with permission of Dr. Glasior.
    Audio of Dr. Glasior recorded by Troy McConaghy.
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Barbara McClintock

  1. 1. Barbara McClintockSeminal Contributions to Genetics<br />
  2. 2. Barbara McClintock Timeline<br />1902—Born Eleanor McClintock in Hartford, Connecticut<br />1919—Graduates from Erasmus Hall High School, Brooklyn<br />1919—Enters undergraduate studies at Cornell <br />fall of 1921—takes Genetics with C. B. Hutchison and cytology with Lester W. Sharp<br />January of 1922—invited by Hutchison to take graduate Genetics course<br />1923, 1925—undergraduate and graduate degrees in botany<br />1927—Receives PhD (botany), Cornell University <br />
  3. 3. Barbara McClintock Timeline<br />1927-31—Instructor and researcher in maize genetics, Cornell University<br />1931—Fellow, National Research Council; conducts research at Cornell, University of Missouri at Columbia, and California Institute of Technology<br />1933-34—Fellow, Guggenheim Memorial Foundation; conducts research at Kaiser Wilhelm Institute, Berlin, and Botanical Institute, Freiburg<br />1934-36—Researcher, Cornell<br />1936-40—Assistant Professor of Genetics, University of Missouri at Columbia<br />1941-67—Researcher in Genetics, Carnegie Institution of Washington Cold Spring Harbor, Long Island, New York<br />
  4. 4. Barbara McClintock Timeline<br />1944—Elected to the National Academy of Sciences<br />1945—Elected President, Genetics Society of America<br />1967—Distinguished Service Award, Carnegie Institution of Washington<br />1971—Receives National Medal of Science<br />1981—Recipient, MacArthur Foundation Grant (inaugural recipient, lifetime award)<br />1981—Recipient, Albert and Mary Lasker Award<br />1983—Receives Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine<br />1992—Dies in Huntington, NY<br />
  5. 5. Fig. 9-04<br />Dominant<br />Dominant<br />Recessive<br />Recessive<br />Flower color <br />Pod shape <br />Constricted<br />Inflated <br />White<br />Purple<br />Pod color <br />Flower position <br />Green <br />Yellow<br />Stem length <br />Axial<br />Terminal <br />Seed color <br />Green <br />Yellow<br />Tall <br />Dwarf<br />Seed shape <br />Wrinkled <br />Round<br />
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  7. 7. Fig. 9-08<br />1<br />1<br />1<br />1<br />2<br />2<br />2<br />2<br />1<br />1<br />1<br />1<br />1<br />1<br />1<br />1<br />4<br />4<br />4<br />4<br />4<br />4<br />4<br />4<br />9<br />16<br />3<br />16<br />3<br />16<br />1<br />16<br />(a) Hypothesis: Dependent assortment<br />(b) Hypothesis: Independent assortment<br />P Generation<br />RRYY<br />RRYY<br />rryy<br />rryy<br />Gametes<br />ry<br />ry<br />Gametes<br />RY<br />RY<br />F1 Generation<br />RrYy<br />RrYy<br />Sperm<br />F2 Generation<br />Ry<br />ry<br />rY<br />RY<br />Sperm<br />ry<br />RY<br />RY<br />RrYY<br />RRYy<br />RrYy<br />RRYY<br />RY<br />rY<br />Yellow<br />round<br />rrYY<br />Eggs<br />RrYy<br />rrYy<br />RrYY<br />Eggs<br />ry<br />Green<br />round<br />Ry<br />RRYy<br />RrYy<br />RRyy<br />Rryy<br />Yellow<br />wrinkled<br />ry<br />rrYy<br />RrYy<br />Rryy<br />rryy<br />Green<br />wrinkled<br />Actual results<br />(support hypothesis)<br />Predicted results<br />(not actually seen)<br />
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  11. 11. CHROMOSOME MORPHOLOGY IN ZEA MAYS<br />Barbara Mcclintock<br />Science 14 June 1929: 629.<br />
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  30. 30. Transposons in Genomes<br />McClintock proposed they were “controlling elements” responsible for regulation of expression in response to stressful conditions.<br />Which did not meet a lot of acceptance initially. Probably because genomes where not thought of as malleable. <br />So the dynamic nature of transposons (and genomes) has since become widely supported<br />
  31. 31. Transposons in Genomes<br />(Including those with RNA as an intermediate)<br /><ul><li>Large percentages of genomes
  32. 32. fruit fly 5%, Human 45%, maize 80%
  33. 33. Provide novel genetic variations when they insert. Some are still active!
  34. 34. Provide a site for recombination that leads to genomic rearrangements
  35. 35. Have been used a molecular tools to mutate model organisms or for gene delivery</li></li></ul><li>a specialized case where she got it absolutely right! VDJ recombination<br />

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