The New World

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The New World

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The New World

  1. 1. UNITED STATES HISTORY I “THE NEW WORLD” By Sara Emami
  2. 2. UNITED STATES HISTORY I GROUP ASSIGNMENT “THE NEW WORLD” Part 1) In groups of 4-5, discuss the concept of immigration and how Americans (United States) perceives immigration. Is immigration a good thing? When we consider the study of the Native Americans and the ways in which they perceived the Puritan arrival, what were their perceptions of the Puritans?
  3. 3. GROUP 1
  4. 4. GROUP 2
  5. 5. GROUP 3
  6. 6. GROUP 4
  7. 7. GROUP 5
  8. 8. GROUP 6
  9. 9. UNITED STATES HISTORY I “THE NEW WORLD” By Sara Emami
  10. 10.  InWestern Hemisphere in general, historians have wrestled with the problem of what to call the hemisphere's first inhabitants.  the “Indies,” explorer Christopher Columbus called the people he met “Indians.”  This was an error in identification that has persisted for more than five hundred years, for the inhabitants of North and South America had no collective name by which they called themselves. Western Hemisphere's First Inhabitants
  11. 11.  Apart from the brief visit of the Scandinavians in the early eleventh century, the Western Hemisphere remained unknown to Europe until Columbus's voyage in 1492.  The first Americans found a hunter's paradise. Mammoths and mastodons, ancestors of the elephant, and elk, moose, and caribou abounded on the North American continent.   Millions of bison lived on the Great Plains The Paleo-Indians were hunter-gatherers who lived in small groups of not more than fifty people.  They were constantly on the move, following the herds of big game, apparently recognizing the rights of other bands to hunting grounds.  These early native people developed a fluted stone point for spears that made their hunting more efficient. Arrival of the first inhabitants.
  12. 12.  Anthropologists have found an astonishing variety of culture and language groups among the native peoples of North America.  Tribes living in close proximity might have spoken totally unrelated languages, while tribes living hundreds of miles from each other might have shared similar languages.  Regions in which a population shares a similar lifestyle based on environmental conditions are known as culture areas.  Although North America can be divided into many such regions, the most significant are the Southwest, Great Plains, and Eastern Woodlands. Life on the North American continent
  13. 13.  East of the Hohokam, the Anasazi lived where the states of New Mexico, Arizona, Colorado, and Utah meet at the Four Corners. The Anasazi built permanent homes and developed villages with as many as fifteen hundred people.  At the high point of Anasazi culture, Chaco Canyon in northwestern New Mexico had twelve villages sustaining some fifteen thousand people, with straight roads connecting outlying settlements. Both the Hohokam and Anasazi established trade connections with tribes in what would become Mexico and California.  A major and dramatic change affected the Hohokam and Anasazi societies in the twelfth and thirteenth centuries, however. The Southwest
  14. 14.  In contrast to the Southwest tribes, early native peoples of the Great Plains were hunters, relying on bison and other Plains animals to provide food, clothing, and shelter.  Tribes followed the large bison herds and claimed extensive areas as their hunting grounds.  Conflicts over territory led to a perpetual rivalry among the tribes that bordered on warfare.  With their dependence on hunting, Plains tribes had difficulty maintaining their standard of living.  Their only domesticated animal was the dog. Limited to what they could carry with them, Plains peoples lived a harsh existence.  The horse, introduced with the arrival of the Europeans in the sixteenth century, transformed the culture of the Great Plains. The Great Plains
  15. 15.  Adena-Hopewell people remained primarily hunter-gatherers, archeological evidence indicates that they had an extensive trading network stretching to the Rocky Mountains and the Gulf and Atlantic coasts.  The first true farmers of the Eastern Woodlands were the Mississippians of the central Mississippi River Valley. The most important Mississippian center was Cahokia, which was located near the confluence of the Missouri and Mississippi Rivers (St. Louis, Missouri).  Cahokia had as many as forty thousand residents in a six-square-mile area, and by the thirteenth century its large population was straining to grow enough food to sustain itself. Aggressive neighbors also contributed to the instability of Cahokia, and the people finally scattered to form smaller villages. The Eastern Woodlands
  16. 16. Estimates of the population of North America at the time of European contact have been revised upward by modern scholarship to as many as ten million.  In modern America, society is chiefly based on the nuclear family (mother, father, and children), but kinship   The clan was composed of several kinship groups that claimed descent from a common ancestor, often a woman.  Native peoples believed that nature was sacred. The sun, moon, stars, mountains, rivers, trees, and animals had spiritual power and were either the gods themselves or the abode of gods Early North American society and culture
  17. 17. HISTORY OF THE NATIVE AMERICANS VIDEO TIME! 

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