DATABASE Fp304 chapter 1

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DATABASE Fp304 chapter 1

  1. 1. FP304 – DATABASE SYSTEM CHAPTER 1 – FUNDAMENTALS OF DATABASE MANAGEMENT SYSTEM
  2. 2. CHAPTER 1 – FUNDAMENTALS OF DBMS WHAT IS DBMS?  A very large integrated collection of data.  Models real-world enterprise.    Entities (e.g., students, courses) Relationships (e.g.,Madonna is t a k i n g FP304 ) A Database Management System is a software package designed to store and manage database
  3. 3. CHAPTER 1 – FUNDAMENTALS OF DBMS WHY USE A DBMS?  Data independence and efficient access  Reduced  Data application development time integrity and security  Unifrom data administration  Concurrent access recovery from crashers
  4. 4. CHAPTER 1 – FUNDAMENTALS OF DBMS WHY STUDY DATABASES?  Shift from computation to information  at the “low end”: scramble to webspace (a mess!)  at the :high end”: scientific applications  Datasets increasing in diversity and volume  Digital libraries, interactive video  ... Nned for DBMS exploding
  5. 5. CHAPTER 1 – FUNDAMENTALS OF DBMS FILES VS. DATABASES
  6. 6. CHAPTER 1 – FUNDAMENTALS OF DBMS ADVANTAGES OF DBMS  Control  Data of data redundancy consistency  Sharing of data  Improved security  Improved backup and recovery services
  7. 7. CHAPTER 1 – FUNDAMENTALS OF DBMS DISADVANTAGES OF DBMS  Complexity  Size  Cost of DBMSs  Higher impact of a failure
  8. 8. CHAPTER 1 – FUNDAMENTALS OF DBMS VARIOUS COMMON OF DBMS  Oracle  Microsoft  SQL Access Server  Sybase  FoxPro
  9. 9. CHAPTER 1 – FUNDAMENTALS OF DBMS FEATURES OF DBMS  Database definition  Nonprocedural access  Application development  Procedural language interface  Transaction processing  Database tuning [BUT, THIS IS AN ASSIGNMENT AND PRESENT!] [PERFORM IN 3 GROUPS]
  10. 10. CHAPTER 1 – FUNDAMENTALS OF DBMS THREE-SCHEMA ARCHITECTURE OF DBMS  First  Level: Internal schema at the internal level to describe data storage structures and access paths. Typically uses a physical data model.
  11. 11. CHAPTER 1 – FUNDAMENTALS OF DBMS THREE-SCHEMA ARCHITECTURE OF DBMS  Second  Level: Conceptual schema at the conceptual level to describe the structure and constraints for the whole database. Uses a conceptual or an implementation data model.
  12. 12. CHAPTER 1 – FUNDAMENTALS OF DBMS THREE-SCHEMA ARCHITECTURE OF DBMS  Third  Level: External schema at the external level to describe the various user views. Usually uses the same data model as the conceptual level.
  13. 13. CHAPTER 1 – FUNDAMENTALS OF DBMS CLIENT-SERVER ARCHITECTURE OF DBMS
  14. 14. CHAPTER 1 – FUNDAMENTALS OF DBMS TRADITIONAL TWO-TIER CLIENTSERVER ARCHITECTURE  Advantages:  It enables wider access to existing databases.  Increased performance  Hardware costs may be reduced  Communication costs are reduced
  15. 15. CHAPTER 1 – FUNDAMENTALS OF DBMS THREE-TIER CLIENT-SERVER ARCHITECTURE  Advantages:  The need for less expensive hardware  Application maintenance is centralized.  The added modularity makes it easier to modify or replace one tier without affecting the other tier.  Load balancing is easier with the separation of core business logic from the database functions.
  16. 16. CHAPTER 1 – FUNDAMENTALS OF DBMS CATEGORIES OF DBMS  Desktop Database  Desktop databases offer an inexpensive, simple solution to many less complex data storage and manipulation requirements.  They earn their name by virtue of the fact that they are designed to run on “desktop” (or personal) computers.
  17. 17. CHAPTER 1 – FUNDAMENTALS OF DBMS CATEGORIES OF DBMS  Server Database  Offer organizations the ability to manage large amounts of data efficiently and in a manner that enables many users to access and update the data simultaneously.  If you’re able to carry the hefty pricetag, a server-based database can provide you with a comprehensive data management solution.
  18. 18. CHAPTER 1 – FUNDAMENTALS OF DBMS CATEGORIES OF DBMS 1. Desktop databases. .Example of desktop databases:  Microsoft Access – from Microsoft in Windows OS.  FoxPro – Windows, Macintosh & UNIX  FileMaker Pro – DOS, all Windows except Win2000.  Paradox – DOS, Windows  Lotus – based on a network server
  19. 19. CHAPTER 1 – FUNDAMENTALS OF DBMS CATEGORIES OF DBMS 2. Server databases .Examples of server databases  Oracle,  Microsoft SQL Server, and  IBM DB2
  20. 20. CHAPTER 1 – FUNDAMENTALS OF DBMS BENEFITS OF DESKTOP DATABASE 1. Inexpensive 2. User-friendly - Desktop DBMSs usually offer an easy-to-navigate graphical user interface. 3. Offers web solution - Many modern desktop databases provide web functionality enabling you to publish your data on the web in a static or dynamic fashion.
  21. 21. CHAPTER 1 – FUNDAMENTALS OF DBMS BENEFITS OF SERVER DATABASE 1. Flexibility - Server-based databases can handle just about any data management problem you can throw at them. 2. Powerful performance - Modern databases can manage multiple high-speed processors, clustered servers, high bandwidth connectivity and fault tolerant storage technology. 3. Scalability - server databases are able to gracefully handle a rapidly expanding amount of users and/or data.
  22. 22. CHAPTER 1 – FUNDAMENTALS OF DBMS DEFINE THE REQUIREMENTS  Who will be using the database and what tasks will they perform?  How often will the data be modified? Who will make these modifications?  Who will be providing IT support for the database?  What hardware is available? Is there a budget for purchasing additional hardware?  Who will be responsible for maintaining the data?  Will data access be offered over the Internet? If so, what level of access should be supported?
  23. 23. DEFINE THE REQUIREMENTS  You may discover that a sophisticated multi-user server platform (like SQL Server or Oracle) is necessary to support your complex requirements.  On the other hand, a desktop database like Microsoft Access might be just as capable of meeting your needs
  24. 24. DATABASE IN SOCIETY  Bank Sector  Government Sector  Telecommunication  Hospitals  Hypermarkets Sector

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