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Liaison Outreach Strategies Z. Smith Reynolds Library August 10, 2010 Scholarly Communication & You
 
<ul><li>Faculty are increasingly challenged by scholarly communication system </li></ul><ul><li>Perception of mixed messag...
BACKGROUND TO THE “CRISIS”
<ul><li>Formulation </li></ul><ul><li>Registration </li></ul><ul><li>Certification </li></ul><ul><li>Dissemination </li></...
Creation Dissemination Publication  (Registration and Certification) Academic Library Publisher Editor Peer Reviewers Manu...
 
Steelmakers Auto manufacturers Consumers Steel $ Cars $ Normal economy
Author Library Journal Article Publisher $ $ Gift economy P&T Grants Reputation Prestige
wholesale transfer of rights creates scarcity/monopoly drives prices up (inelastic market) Publisher IP
<ul><li>Economic model proved unsustainable </li></ul><ul><li>Web    Disaggregation of system </li></ul><ul><li>Open movem...
<ul><li>Open to contributions and participation </li></ul><ul><li>Open and free to access </li></ul><ul><li>Open to use & ...
<ul><li>Generally enabled by technology </li></ul><ul><li>Works both inside and outside of traditional models </li></ul><u...
<ul><li>Open access </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Public access </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Open source </li></ul><ul><li>Open educatio...
<ul><li>Open access literature is digital, online, free of charge, and free of most copyright and licensing restrictions. ...
<ul><ul><li>Publishing  (journals & books) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>‘ gold’ </li></ul></ul>Archiving (self, institutiona...
<ul><li>Publication that is free & open for anyone to access on internet </li></ul><ul><li>Supported by variety of models ...
<ul><li>Has taken time for impact factors to build </li></ul><ul><li>Just beginning to get a real sense of what the costs ...
<ul><li>Literature published through traditional channels that is made openly available through deposit in a repository or...
<ul><li>Participation of faculty (particularly for institutional) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Discipline based repositories ofte...
<ul><ul><li>Public should have ready and easy access  to taxpayer funded research </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Linked to ide...
<ul><li>Principle of openness not just about ‘free’ </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Ability to reuse </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Abil...
WHAT YOU CAN DO
<ul><li>Because they are the producers and the consumers of the products of scholarly communication </li></ul><ul><li>Beca...
<ul><li>Purpose: Understand the scholarly communication environments for particular disciplines and help to identify advoc...
<ul><li>Many publishers are now giving authors more rights in return for assigning them copyright; ask if faculty know whi...
<ul><li>Q: Can I determine what rights I retained? </li></ul><ul><li>A: Yes! Use the SHERPA/RoMEO database.  http://www.sh...
<ul><li>Despite the common misconception, only about half of OA journals charge author fees </li></ul><ul><li>Articles do ...
<ul><li>Q: Are there OA journals in my field? </li></ul><ul><li>A: Let’s check DOAJ: Directory of Open Access Journals to ...
“ My goal is now to have a conversation not a convert.”
<ul><li>Open Access Guide http://guides.zsr.wfu.edu/openaccess   </li></ul><ul><li>ZSR Scholarly Communication Resources h...
<ul><li>Slides 5-11 originally created by Lee Van Orsdel for the ACRL Scholarly Communication 101: Starting with the Basic...
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Scholarly Communication and You: Liaison Outreach Strategies

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A presentation to library liaisons by Molly Keener, Scholarly Communication Librarian

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  • Simplify all of those actions to the process of formulation (generating new ideas, gathering data, formulating manuscripts), registration (this is my idea!), certification (peer review), dissemination (traditionally publication), and preservation
  • For simplicity’s sake, let’s break the complex system of scholarship into just 4 phases (develop slide) that match the way we have mostly perceived the cycle in academic libraries (CLICK through) Then…….CHARACTERISTICS of this system: Well-established PROCESS for authors once a mss was submitted This process was LINEAR and FORMAL and CLOSELY MANAGED by publishers Note how little of the process is controlled by the author/researcher. Dissemination and Access largely controlled by EXTERNAL AGENTS, specifically, by publishers and libraries This system worked well enough to please researchers for many, many decades.. Now that system is under threat from a number of forces and change is happening very fast. Let’s take a look at THREE disruptive forces that are driving change in the SC System
  • THIS IS TYPICAL, MARKET ECONOMY MARKET==THERE IS RECIPROCITY BETWEEN SUPPLIERS, PRODUCERS AND CONSUMERS IN THIS ECONOMY, YOU CAN BE SURE THAT BOTH STEELMAKERS AND AUTO MAKDERS PRICE ACCORDING TO DEMAND. THE FACT THAT BOTH DEPEND ON CONSUMERS TO WANT THE CARS THEY PRODUCE, AND BOTH KNOW THAT CONSUMERS HAVE A PRICE POINT BEYOND WHICH THEY WON’T GO, HELPS KEEP PRICE AND DESIRE FOR PROFITS IN BALANCE.
  • Authors more or less oblivious because were seeking rewards in a separate system altogether (click for shapes); Two separate economies at work here! Prices rose astronomically; authors suffered no adverse consequence (because their rewards came from another system).
  • Enlightened management of IP rights by authors is critical to creating a more sustainable system. When authors give all their copyrights to publishers, they give publishers the ability to create scarcity, which translates into very high prices for those who want access.
  • Transcript of "Scholarly Communication and You: Liaison Outreach Strategies"

    1. 1. Liaison Outreach Strategies Z. Smith Reynolds Library August 10, 2010 Scholarly Communication & You
    2. 3. <ul><li>Faculty are increasingly challenged by scholarly communication system </li></ul><ul><li>Perception of mixed messages from ZSR, Provost’s Office </li></ul><ul><li>Liaisons help unify message, connect individuals as needed </li></ul>Why involve liaisons?
    3. 4. BACKGROUND TO THE “CRISIS”
    4. 5. <ul><li>Formulation </li></ul><ul><li>Registration </li></ul><ul><li>Certification </li></ul><ul><li>Dissemination </li></ul><ul><li>Preservation </li></ul>The life cycle of scholarship
    5. 6. Creation Dissemination Publication (Registration and Certification) Academic Library Publisher Editor Peer Reviewers Manuscript & IP Reformulation
    6. 8. Steelmakers Auto manufacturers Consumers Steel $ Cars $ Normal economy
    7. 9. Author Library Journal Article Publisher $ $ Gift economy P&T Grants Reputation Prestige
    8. 10. wholesale transfer of rights creates scarcity/monopoly drives prices up (inelastic market) Publisher IP
    9. 11. <ul><li>Economic model proved unsustainable </li></ul><ul><li>Web Disaggregation of system </li></ul><ul><li>Open movement </li></ul>Disruptions
    10. 12. <ul><li>Open to contributions and participation </li></ul><ul><li>Open and free to access </li></ul><ul><li>Open to use & reuse with few or no restrictions </li></ul><ul><li>Transparency </li></ul>What do we mean by open?
    11. 13. <ul><li>Generally enabled by technology </li></ul><ul><li>Works both inside and outside of traditional models </li></ul><ul><li>Supported by a variety of business models </li></ul>Commonalities
    12. 14. <ul><li>Open access </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Public access </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Open source </li></ul><ul><li>Open education </li></ul><ul><li>Open data </li></ul><ul><li>Open science </li></ul><ul><li>Open books </li></ul><ul><li>Open peer review… </li></ul>Open movements
    13. 15. <ul><li>Open access literature is digital, online, free of charge, and free of most copyright and licensing restrictions. </li></ul><ul><li>- Peter Suber </li></ul>Open Access
    14. 16. <ul><ul><li>Publishing (journals & books) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>‘ gold’ </li></ul></ul>Archiving (self, institutional, disciplinary) ‘ green’ ‘ Two Roads’ to Open Access
    15. 17. <ul><li>Publication that is free & open for anyone to access on internet </li></ul><ul><li>Supported by variety of models </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Institution / funder supported OR author-supported (2006 – 47% author supported) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Generally allow authors to retain copyright and/or license under creative commons </li></ul><ul><li>5266 number of OA journals according to Directory of Open Access Journals across all disciplines – share common features with toll access journals </li></ul>Open Access Publishing (‘Gold’)
    16. 18. <ul><li>Has taken time for impact factors to build </li></ul><ul><li>Just beginning to get a real sense of what the costs are for supporting a high quality open access journal – business models still emerging </li></ul><ul><li>Author pays model has better traction in the STM community </li></ul>Issues
    17. 19. <ul><li>Literature published through traditional channels that is made openly available through deposit in a repository or placing on web site </li></ul><ul><li>Institutional, departmental, or discipline based repository </li></ul><ul><li>Range of publisher policies on deposit </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Often post-prints (final author manuscript) can be deposited but publisher version cannot </li></ul></ul>Open Access via Archiving/Repositories (‘Green’)
    18. 20. <ul><li>Participation of faculty (particularly for institutional) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Discipline based repositories often rooted in cultures used to sharing </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Questions of authority of pre-print/post-print </li></ul><ul><li>Copyright issues murky and (often) frustrating </li></ul>Issues
    19. 21. <ul><ul><li>Public should have ready and easy access to taxpayer funded research </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Linked to idea of open government and transparency </li></ul></ul>Public Access
    20. 22. <ul><li>Principle of openness not just about ‘free’ </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Ability to reuse </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Ability to contribute to and participate in </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Transparency </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Multiple methods for open access and multiple business models to support – many new models emerging </li></ul><ul><li>Public access has traction </li></ul><ul><li>Range of movements around ‘openness’ in higher education – libraries should be aware of all </li></ul>Summary
    21. 23. WHAT YOU CAN DO
    22. 24. <ul><li>Because they are the producers and the consumers of the products of scholarly communication </li></ul><ul><li>Because they edit journals, sit on editorial boards, provide peer review, and are officers of scholarly societies </li></ul><ul><li>Because they are the movers behind many new models of scholarship (often because of their own frustrations!) </li></ul><ul><li>Because they can make change in ways that libraries struggle to do on their own </li></ul>Why engage with faculty?
    23. 25. <ul><li>Purpose: Understand the scholarly communication environments for particular disciplines and help to identify advocates and allies within the faculty. </li></ul><ul><li>Collect Information Like: </li></ul><ul><li>Who on the faculty are editors? </li></ul><ul><li>What are the major scholarly societies? What are their policies on author rights? Open access? </li></ul><ul><li>Have any of the major journals published papers about scholarly communication in the field? </li></ul><ul><li>Is there a disciplinary repository? Is it well used? </li></ul><ul><li>Do the common funders have open access mandates? </li></ul><ul><li>What are the tenure and promotion codes in the department? </li></ul>Tool: Environmental Scan
    24. 26. <ul><li>Many publishers are now giving authors more rights in return for assigning them copyright; ask if faculty know which rights they retained </li></ul><ul><li>Ask if faculty are having difficulty complying with the NIH Public Access Policy; if so, point them to the informational page on ZSR’s site </li></ul><ul><li>If faculty archive their publications in repositories or on personal websites, invite them to contribute to WakeSpace </li></ul>Talking points: Author Rights
    25. 27. <ul><li>Q: Can I determine what rights I retained? </li></ul><ul><li>A: Yes! Use the SHERPA/RoMEO database. http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/ </li></ul><ul><li>Q: What is a PMCID number? </li></ul><ul><li>A: The number demonstrating compliance with the NIH Public Access Policy. See the FAQ at the NIH Policy site. http://nihpublicaccess.gov </li></ul><ul><li>Q: Can I post my article in WakeSpace? </li></ul><ul><li>A: Hopefully! Talk to Molly Keener to find out… </li></ul>Q&A: Author Rights
    26. 28. <ul><li>Despite the common misconception, only about half of OA journals charge author fees </li></ul><ul><li>Articles do not have to be published in OA journals to be archived in repositories </li></ul><ul><li>WFU does not have an OA mandate, although OA exploration is encouraged </li></ul>Talking points: Open Access
    27. 29. <ul><li>Q: Are there OA journals in my field? </li></ul><ul><li>A: Let’s check DOAJ: Directory of Open Access Journals to find out! http://www.doaj.org </li></ul><ul><li>Q: What is a hybrid journal? </li></ul><ul><li>A: A journal that is subscription-access that makes individual articles available open access for a fee. </li></ul><ul><li>Q: Is there funding available to pay OA fees? </li></ul><ul><li>A: Yes! ZSR has an Open Access Fund to help authors cover the costs of OA publishing. </li></ul>Q&A: Open Access
    28. 30. “ My goal is now to have a conversation not a convert.”
    29. 31. <ul><li>Open Access Guide http://guides.zsr.wfu.edu/openaccess </li></ul><ul><li>ZSR Scholarly Communication Resources http://zsr.wfu.edu/services/scholarly </li></ul><ul><li>ACRL Scholarly Communication Toolkit http://www.acrl.ala.org/scholcomm </li></ul><ul><li>Molly Keener [email_address] | x5829 | 402, Reynolds Wing </li></ul>Resources
    30. 32. <ul><li>Slides 5-11 originally created by Lee Van Orsdel for the ACRL Scholarly Communication 101: Starting with the Basics workshop and adapted by Molly Keener for this presentation </li></ul><ul><li>Slides 12-22 originally created by Sarah Shreeves for the ACRL Scholarly Communication 101: Starting with the Basics workshop and adapted by Molly Keener for this presentation </li></ul><ul><li>Slides 24-25, 30 originally created by Sarah Shreeves and Joy Kirchner for the ACRL Scholarly Communication 101: Starting with the Basics workshop and adapted by Molly Keener for this presentation </li></ul><ul><li>Slide 14 photo: Door - http://www.flickr.com/photos/crystalina/ </li></ul><ul><li>Slide 16 photo: Arrows - http://www.flickr.com/photos/1000/ </li></ul><ul><li>Slide 30 photo: Slow - http://www.flickr.com/photos/fatboyke/ </li></ul><ul><li>All photos used under a Creative Commons 3.0 Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 license </li></ul><ul><li>This work was created by Molly Keener on August 11, 2010. It is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 United States License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/us/ or send a letter to Creative Commons, 171 Second Street, Suite 300, San Francisco, California, 94105, USA. </li></ul>Acknowledgements

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