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[Smart Grid Market Research] The Optimized Grid - Zpryme Smart Grid Insights
 

[Smart Grid Market Research] The Optimized Grid - Zpryme Smart Grid Insights

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Optimizing utilization and operating efficiency in electricity delivery system is one of smart grid’s characteristics. Transmission and distribution infrastructure includes transmission lines, ...

Optimizing utilization and operating efficiency in electricity delivery system is one of smart grid’s characteristics. Transmission and distribution infrastructure includes transmission lines, substations, and distribution feeders. One estimate has put the potential in reducing distribution losses through smart grid deployment at 30%. In this report Zpryme looks at the distribution system portion of the smart grid and the portfolio of technologies that are being deployed to optimize the distribution infrastructure.

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    [Smart Grid Market Research] The Optimized Grid - Zpryme Smart Grid Insights [Smart Grid Market Research] The Optimized Grid - Zpryme Smart Grid Insights Presentation Transcript

    • Smart Grid Insights [PREMIUM] Intelligence by Zpryme July 2012 www.smartgridresearch.org The Optimized Grid A 10-Page Special ReportCopyright © 2012 Zpryme Research & Consulting, LLC All rights reserved www.zpryme.com
    • Table of ContentsThe Optimized Grid .................................................................... 2Transmission & Distribution Losses ............................................. 3Distribution Automation............................................................. 3Evolution of Distribution Automation ....................................... 3Substation Automation ............................................................. 4Feeder Automation ................................................................... 4Volt/VAR Optimization .............................................................. 4FLISR .............................................................................................. 5The Business Case for Distribution Automation ...................... 5Opportunities by Geography ................................................... 7Distribution Automation (DA) Forecasts by Region .............. 7Key Player Spotlight ................................................................... 8Short-Term Outlook .................................................................. 101 www.zpryme.com | www.smartgridresearch.org Zpryme Smart Grid Insights. The Optimized Grid | July 2012Copyright © 2012 Zpryme Research & Consulting, LLC All rights reserved.
    • The Optimized Grid Global Distribution Automation Market Value Forecast CAGR = 25%Optimizing utilization and operating efficiency in electricity 2012 to 2020 (in US billions) $40 (figure 1, source: Zpryme)delivery system is one of smart grid’s characteristics.Transmission and distribution infrastructure includes $35 $33.9transmission lines, substations, and distribution feeders. One $30estimate has put the potential in reducing distribution $26.2losses through smart grid deployment at 30%.1 $25 $20.6 $20In this report Zpryme looks at the distribution system portion $16.4of the smart grid and the portfolio of technologies that are $15 $13.5 $11.3being deployed to optimize the distribution infrastructure. $9.0 $10 $7.4 $5.7The global distribution automation (DA) market will be $5driven by smart grid investments in emerging countries $0such as China, Brazil, and India, and by European policies 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020that aim to have 80% smart meter deployments by 2020.However, the current market for DA is driven by Global Distibution Automation Market Segmentationprogressive utilities in North America. 2012 to 2020 - Region % of Global Market (figure 2, source: Zpryme)  The global DA market is projected to reach $5.7 100% 9% ROW billion in 2012. North America (44%) and Asia Pacific 90% 16% 17% 20% 19% 18% 15% 12% 10% (25%) will account for about 70% of the global 80% 25% market in 2012. Asia 70% 24% 26% 34% 37% Pacific 26% 28% 29% 32%  By 2020, the global DA market is projected to reach 60% 15% 14% Europe $33.9 billion. The DA market is projected to grow at a 50% 7% 14% 14% 14% 14% 15% 15% 16% compound annual growth rate of 25% from 2012 to 40% 7% 7% 7% 7% 2020. By 2020, Asia Pacific will account for 37% of 30% 7% 8% 9% 10% Latin & the global market. South 20% 44% 39% 37% America 34% 32% 31% 30% 29% 28% 10% North America 0% 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 20201 www.members.weforum.org/pdf/SlimCity/SmartGrid2009.pdf2 www.zpryme.com | www.smartgridresearch.org Zpryme Smart Grid Insights. The Optimized Grid | July 2012Copyright © 2012 Zpryme Research & Consulting, LLC All rights reserved.
    • Transmission & Distribution Losses These include improve reliability and power quality, reduce operating costs, improve outage restoration time,Worldwide electricity losses through transmission and increase customer service options, integration of DER, anddistribution (T&D) account for almost 9% of total electricity integration of customer facing energy applications.supplied. According to the U.S. Energy InformationAdministration statistics, electricity distribution losses in the Evolution of Distribution AutomationU.S. in 2010 alone were about 261 billion kWh. Reducingdistribution losses in the U.S. by just 1% would save about Distribution automation has been around for decades. In2.6 billion kWh of electricity, more than the total electricity its initial stages, efficiency improvement was the mainthe country of Uganda generated. driver of distribution automation. However, the definition and scope of DA is evolving with a set of newLosses within T&D infrastructure are characterized by two technologies and utility needs. In 1998, the IEEE broadlycomponents: technical and non-technical losses. defined DA as “a set of technologies that enable anTechnical losses such as line losses consist mainly within the electric utility to remotely monitor, coordinate, andelectricity components and system. Non-technical losses operate distribution components in a real time mode fromare attributed primarily to electricity theft, customer non- remote locations.” In a recent white paper for NIST, thepayment, and inefficient or erroneous accounting. IEEE updates its definition of DA to “any automation which is used in the planning, engineering, construction,Distribution Automation operation, and maintenance of the distribution power system, including interactions with the transmission system,Distribution automation (DA) is the backbone of the future interconnected distributed energy resources (DER), andintelligent distribution network. Historically, distribution automated interfaces with end-users.”2systems do not have much automation. Systemequipment, once installed, was expected to perform In this later definition, the scope of DA has grown fromautonomously with only occasional manual interventions. mainly remote monitoring and automatic reconfigurationIn response to demands for higher reliability and power to encompass several key characteristics of the smart grid.quality, improved efficiency through reducing technical More specifically: operating efficiency, optimizing assetlosses, lower operating costs, demand response utilization, accommodating renewable and distributedcapabilities, and increasing the use of distributed energy generation, and market forces.resources (DER), distribution operations are becomingmore and more automated. Traditional distribution automation capacities include automation of switching functions with limitedThe strategic drivers for advanced distribution automation www.grouper.ieee.org/groups/td/dist/da/doc/IEEE%20Distribution%20Automation%20Ware fundamentally the characteristics of the smart grid. 2 orking%20Group%20White%20Paper%20v3.pdf3 www.zpryme.com | www.smartgridresearch.org Zpryme Smart Grid Insights. The Optimized Grid | July 2012Copyright © 2012 Zpryme Research & Consulting, LLC All rights reserved.
    • reconfiguration capabilities and other individual functions automation can be used in conjunction with an outagesuch as Volt/VAR control. The new vision for DA now management system to automatically identify possibleincludes automation of all controllable equipment and fault locations on the distribution system resulting inadvanced reconfiguration for optimizing performance improved response and restoration time.capabilities. In a sense, the new generation of DAtechnologies will allow distribution system to be fully Feeder Automationautomatic relying on minimal manual intervention. Two key applications that are driving feeder automationSubstation Automation are: Volt/VAR optimization and Fault Location, Isolation, and Service Restoration (FLISR). Each application offersDistribution substation automation represents the first level different value propositions to utilities. Broadly speaking,of EPRI’s advanced distribution automation Volt/VAR optimization technology helps improveimplementation plan. In 2005, it estimated the cost for efficiency by reducing electricity losses and the demandsintegrating distribution substation automation to the grid made on distribution systems while FILSR technology offersinfrastructure at about $10 billion. The same study economic reliability by improving system restoration time.estimated the integration cost for feeder automation ataround $70 billion.3 Volt/VAR OptimizationMarkets for substation and feeder automation are Volt/VAR control is a fundamental part of optimizing therelatively segregated with substation automation having a electrical distribution system. Its primary purpose is tomuch higher market penetration. According to a DOE manage the flow of electricity to maintain acceptablereport, as of 2005 84% of U.S. electricity companies had voltage at all loading conditions along the distributionimplemented or plan to implement substation automation system. In a nonintegrated system, Volt/VAR managementcompared with only 20% for feeder automation.4,5 is achieved by autonomously operated devices such asHowever, the majority of substation automation capacitor banks. New Volt/VAR control technologyapplications are in monitoring and control of breakers and improves optimization at the system level through the useequipments; hence, there are significant opportunities to of real-time information and system modeling toimprove substation automation applications and integrate continuously optimize power delivery efficiency and peakthem with the distribution system. For example, substation demand. In a smart grid environment, Volt/VAR’s management objective will go beyond keeping voltage3 EPRI Research Plan for Advanced Distribution Automation. Slide 18. within allowable limits and reducing technical losses. Aswww.grouper.ieee.org/groups/td/dist/da/doc/IEEE%20GM%202005%20ADA%20Panel%20-%20Goodman%20-%20EPRI%20Research%20Plan.pdf distributed energy resources grow, real-time Volt/VAR4 DOE (2010) Smart Grid System Report optimization will play a significant role in maintaining5 CEC 500-2007-028, VALUE OF DISTRIBUTION AUTOMATION APPLICATIONS reports 80%penetration voltage stability and power quality on the distribution4 www.zpryme.com | www.smartgridresearch.org Zpryme Smart Grid Insights. The Optimized Grid | July 2012Copyright © 2012 Zpryme Research & Consulting, LLC All rights reserved.
    • feeders. When outages and faults occur, Volt/VAR control The Business Case for Distribution Automationwill also help to restore the system after feederreconfiguration. While distribution automation technologies are commercially available for wide scale utility deployment;FLISR implementation of DA is a complex process that involves multiple departments within a utility, long-term decisionAn FLISR system can detect feeder faults, determine the making in term of system architecture, and potentially highfault location, isolate the faulted section of the feeder, investment costs. Making the business case for DA isand restore service to the unaffected portions of the complicated by the fact that its benefits include valuesfeeder. In simpler terms, FLISR provides the means for utility that are not easily quantifiable such as improved customerto restore service to some customers before field crews satisfaction and safety. Some benefits are more difficult toarrive on the scene thereby reducing the number of calculate; for example, savings from reduced labor costscustomers affected by power outage. Other benefits due to automatic fault detections depend on how manyinclude minimizing lost revenues due to the ability to get outages are expected, the number, which at best isunaffected customer back online sooner and operational probabilistic.efficiency in cost savings due to a fewer number of faultinvestigations, and lower patrol time because fault Like any smart grid investment, values derived from DAlocation is narrowed down. deployment vary according to utilities context. The key in making a business case is identifying applications thatThe level of control offered by an FLISR system depends on provide the best return on investment in ways that can bethe back-end software architecture. With current measured by utilities. In the U.S., uncertainties due totechnology offering, identifying and isolating faults are deregulation and restructuring of the power industry havenow relatively easy but automatically restoring power still been blamed for the slow implementation of distributionremains a challenge. A fully automatic system is the most automation.complex approach to DA and is currently deployed inpilot stages. A semi-automatic approach lets the system Utilities that have performance-based rates may considerautomatically perform relatively “easy” actions such as FLISR for its ability to improve certain reliability metricsidentifying faults and restoring upstream services while measured by regulators. While utilities that are able to passsystem operators remain in control of more complicated the cost of line losses to the customers or distributor ofactions. power without retail licenses, the benefit of line loses reduction add little value without changes from the regulator.5 www.zpryme.com | www.smartgridresearch.org Zpryme Smart Grid Insights. The Optimized Grid | July 2012Copyright © 2012 Zpryme Research & Consulting, LLC All rights reserved.
    • Global Distribution Automation Market Value by Region, 2012 – 2020 (table 1, source: Zpryme, in US billions) Market Value 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 CAGR World Region North America $2.5 $2.9 $3.3 $3.8 $4.4 $5.0 $6.2 $7.6 $9.4 18% Latin & South America $0.4 $0.5 $0.6 $0.8 $1.0 $1.2 $1.7 $2.4 $3.3 30% Europe $0.9 $1.0 $1.3 $1.5 $1.9 $2.3 $3.0 $4.0 $5.3 26% Asia Pacific $1.4 $1.8 $2.3 $2.9 $3.8 $4.8 $6.6 $9.0 $12.4 31% ROW $0.5 $1.2 $1.5 $2.2 $2.5 $3.0 $3.1 $3.2 $3.5 27% Total $5.7 $7.4 $9.0 $11.3 $13.5 $16.4 $20.6 $26.2 $33.9 25% Percent of Total Market North America 44% 39% 37% 34% 32% 31% 30% 29% 28% Latin & South America 7% 7% 7% 7% 7% 7% 8% 9% 10% Europe 15% 14% 14% 14% 14% 14% 15% 15% 16% Asia Pacific 25% 24% 26% 26% 28% 29% 32% 34% 37% ROW 9% 16% 17% 20% 19% 18% 15% 12% 10% Total 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% Global Distribution Automation Market Value %, 2012 Global Distribution Automation Market Value %, 2020 figure 3, source: Zpryme figure 4, source: Zpryme North America Asia Pacific 44% 36% ROW Europe ROW 9% Latin & 16% 10% South Asia Pacific Europe North America 25% 15% Latin & America 7% South 28% America 10%6 www.zpryme.com | www.smartgridresearch.org Zpryme Smart Grid Insights. The Optimized Grid | July 2012Copyright © 2012 Zpryme Research & Consulting, LLC All rights reserved.
    • Opportunities by Geography  One of India’s leading suppliers in network automation, Siemens recently announced a turnkeyIt seems natural to talk about global infrastructure supervisory control and data acquisition technologyinvestments in terms of developed and emerging order with India’s Maharashtra’s State Electricityeconomies. While it’s generally true that the U.S. and Distribution Company. As part of the $24.5 millionEurope need to focus more on modernizing aging deal, the company will install distribution substationinfrastructure and to accommodate DER and EV automation systems with integrated IT systems aspenetrations. And while infrastructure in emerging markets well as provide maintenance and other services formay be newer, the existing systems could benefit from five years after the systems are commissioned.7distribution system automation. Renewable energy andDER will also be key drivers of smart grids for many  China for its part has developed and implementedemerging economies due to energy security concerns an aggressive plan for the national smart grid.and government policies. Implementation for distribution automation system is underway in 27 cities across the country. By 2020,For markets that are deregulated benefits from DA the State Grid Corporation of China plans toinvestments are constrained by regulatory rules and comprehensively deploy distribution automationmarket forces. Hence, some state-owned utilities may and controls in all prefecture-level cities within itsadopt DA technologies at a faster pace due to the lack of territories.regulatory and business uncertainties as well asgovernment support. For example, in 2007 the Korean Distribution Automation (DA) Forecasts by RegionElectric Power Corporation (KEPCO) reported having 90%integration of automated feeders in its distribution North America: From 2012 to 2020, the North Americanautomation system. With its successes at home, KEPCO has market is projected to grow from $2.5 billion to $9.4 billionlaunched projects to supply new DA technologies in with a compound annual growth rate of 18%. In 2012, theIndonesia, Vietnam and China.6 region will account for 44% of the global market, but this figure is projected to drop to 28% by 2020.Size also matters. Large emerging markets such as Brazil,China, and India still provide great opportunity for growth. Latin & South America: From 2012 to 2020, the Latin &Infrastructure investments in these markets are driven by South American market is projected to grow from $0.4grid expansion, demographic growth, and rapid billion to $3.3 billion with a compound annual growth rateurbanization. of 30%. In 2012, this region will account for 7% of the market, but this figure is projected to reach 10% by 2020. 7 www.smartgridnews.com/artman/publish/Business_Global/Siemens-picks-up-24-5-6 www.grouper.ieee.org/groups/td/dist/da/doc/2008-07Kepco.pdf Slide 8 million-SCADA-DMS-order-from-India-4553.html7 www.zpryme.com | www.smartgridresearch.org Zpryme Smart Grid Insights. The Optimized Grid | July 2012Copyright © 2012 Zpryme Research & Consulting, LLC All rights reserved.
    • Europe: From 2012 to 2020, the European market is ABBprojected to grow from $0.9 billion to $5.3 billion with acompound annual growth rate of 26%. In 2012, this region As the world’s largest maker of power distributionwill account for 15% of the global market, but this figure is equipment, ABB has a wide customer base. It operates inprojected to grow to 16% by 2020. about 100 countries with manufacturing and R&D base in many developing countries. In recent years it has madeAsia Pacific: From 2012 to 2020, the Asia Pacific market is several strategic moves to expand offerings in theprojected to grow from $1.4 billion to $12.4 billion with a distributed automation and smart grid portfolio throughcompound annual growth rate of 31%. In 2012, this region acquisitions of several software firms and low-voltagewill account for 25% of the global market, but this figure is components makers. One such acquisition, Ventyx, hasprojected to increase to 37% by 2020. helped the company become one of the leaders in energy industry enterprise and asset management in NorthRest of World (ROW): From 2012 to 2020, the ROW market is America.projected to grow from $0.5 billion to $3.5 billion with acompound annual growth rate of 27%. In 2012, the ROW In March 2012, ABB was awarded a contract from thewill account for 9% of the market and increase to 10% of Iraq’s Ministry of Electricity to upgrade and rehabilitatethe market by 2020. power distribution network in Baghdad. The company will install integrated software solution from its Ventyx portfolioKey Player Spotlight as well as supply the communications equipments and remote terminal units to monitor and control power supplies. As part of several infrastructure improvementUtility infrastructure is a long-cycle business. As such, initiatives currently underway in Iraq, the project willcompanies with extensive product range and expansive improve the availability and quality of electricity forsupply chain distribution are oftentimes the key players. customers in densely populated areas of the country’sWe look at four leaders in global electric power market capital.8place who are providing utilities with physical componentsas well as the back-end network to support distributed Siemensautomation. All of these companies are rapidly expandingtheir smart grid presence by acquiring, establishing Siemens has positioned itself as a one-stop supplier ofalliances and partnerships that bring end-to-end solutions, energy automation technology. With extensive equipmentincluding whole products and services, to utility customers. portfolios, the focus for smart grid is on a tight integration of IT, operation technology, communication, and automation to power components. The company has 8 www.abb.com/cawp/seitp202/ca3424817ffc3cf2c12579cd00338a85.aspx8 www.zpryme.com | www.smartgridresearch.org Zpryme Smart Grid Insights. The Optimized Grid | July 2012Copyright © 2012 Zpryme Research & Consulting, LLC All rights reserved.
    • Summary of Key Player Distribution Automation Solutions (table 2, source: Zpryme)Company Distribution Automation Solutions (select list – not an exhaustive list of solutions) Key Utility Customers  Substation automation & protection  CenterPoint Energy  Distribution protection and control  Duke Energy  Feeder automation  Long Island Power AuthorityABB  Distribution communication and networking solutions  Progress Energy  Network Manager  CDEC-SIC, Chile  Distribution management system (via Ventyx solutions)  UTE, Uruguay  Kansas City Power & Light  Medium voltage automation (Efficient Network and Energy Automation Systems)  Oncor Electric  Feeder automation (Efficient Network and Energy Automation Systems)Siemens  A & N Electric  Applications (Efficient Network and Energy Automation Systems)  Maharashtras State Electricity  Distribution automation communication networks (via purchase of RuggedCom) Distribution Company Ltd, India  Distribution automation controllers  Outage management Systems  Distribution management systems  PacifiCorp  Feeder protection systems  Electrica de Guayaquil, EcuadorGE  GIS  Norcross Electric Cities of  Substation automation systems and solutions Georgia  Substation gateways and RTUs  Solutions as a Service  Medium voltage monitoring, control, and fault detection  Substation automation systems  Dazhou Power Group, ChinaSchneider  Power and energy monitoring systems  Basra, IraqElectric  L500 network management  Rivers State Government, Nigeria  Advanced Distribution Management System (Telvent)9 www.zpryme.com | www.smartgridresearch.org Zpryme Smart Grid Insights. The Optimized Grid | July 2012Copyright © 2012 Zpryme Research & Consulting, LLC All rights reserved.
    • taken a software-centric approach in order to provide an utilities. Under this new business model, the company’send-to-end network infrastructure that enhance its Grid IQ Solution will be implementing smart grid system forbusiness lines in power generation, transmission, and the utility for a monthly fee. GE hopes to sign up moredistribution. utilities to take advantage of the economy-of-scale.9Siemens and A&N Electric Cooperative recently Schneider Electriccompleted an ultra-high-speed distribution feederautomation system for Riverside Shore Memorial Hospital. Schneider Electric has fast become one of the majorThe system enables A&N Electric to detect faults, isolate players in serving utility customers. In the past two years, itproblems, and transfer to alternative power sources almost has made two major acquisitions that greatly expanded itsinstantly improving the service reliability of the only hospital distribution system management offerings both in softwareserving the eastern shore of Virginia. System and actual devices. Like others, the company has beencommunication equipments are handled by RuggedCom, providing more energy software solutions, consultancy,a Canadian based company specialized in and project management capabilities.communication equipments for harsh electrical andclimatic environment. Siemens Canada Limited later Telvent, a subsidiary of Schneider Electric, in a partnershipacquired RuggedCom in March 2012. with IBM were selected for a smart grid project for the largest distributor of electricity in Ontario, Hydro One. IBMGE and Telvent will run tests and simulations to determine the smart grid technologies that best fit Hydro One’s electricityLike Siemens, GE has extensive interests in the power distribution system needs, including enabling increasedindustry. The company has been promoting smart grid amount of distributed generation feed to the grid.10solutions to utilities by offering comprehensive services and Schneider Electric acquired Telvent, a Spain-basedturnkey contracts. In one of the latest announcements, GE analytical software maker, for $2 billion in 2011.offers up FLISR systems that can be deployed inincremental stages and scalable across the system. The Short-Term Outlookcompany also ventured into providing cloud-based dataservices as part of their smart grid solutions. GE is also In the near-term utilities will continue to invest inpioneering the concept of smart grid as a service. technologies that enable them to more effectively manage the grid. In more mature markets the growth willIn 2011, GE announced a fee-for-service for smart grid be driven by needs to modernize aging infrastructure andproject with the city of Norcross Electric Cities of Georgia. the need for increasing reliability. The global trends inThe company will provide an integrated systemspecifically tailored to mid-market and community-owned 9 www.genewscenter.com/Content/detail.aspx?NewsAreaId=2&ReleaseID=13492 10 www.www-03.ibm.com/press/us/en/pressrelease/37308.wss10 www.zpryme.com | www.smartgridresearch.org Zpryme Smart Grid Insights. The Optimized Grid | July 2012Copyright © 2012 Zpryme Research & Consulting, LLC All rights reserved.
    • urbanization and energy efficiency are more prominent inemerging markets where many countries are encouraginginvestment in energy grids, in these markets intelligenthardware will make up a larger share of the investment inthe short term.As with any investment, the availability of financing will bea barrier for mid and small utilities. Companies offeringsolutions that are scalable will be more attractive to utilitieswith limited access to capital who may choose to deploysmart grid systems targeted at critical needs or those yetunwilling to take the plunge into a full-scale smart gridsystem.11 www.zpryme.com | www.smartgridresearch.org Zpryme Smart Grid Insights. The Optimized Grid | July 2012Copyright © 2012 Zpryme Research & Consulting, LLC All rights reserved.
    • About Zpryme Smart Grid Insights: Zpryme-powered Smart Grid Insights Publication, Practice and Advisory Board help organizations understand their business environment, engage consumers, inspire innovation, and take action. Zpryme Smart Grid Insights represents an evolution beyond traditional market research and consulting: combining sound fundamentals, innovative tools and methodologies, industry experience, and creative marketing savvy to supercharge clients’ success. At Zpryme, we don’t produce tables and charts; we deliver opportunity-focused, actionable insight that is both engaging and easy-to-digest. For more information regarding our custom research, visit: www.zpryme.com. Zpryme Smart Grid Insights Contact: smart.grid@zpryme.com | +1 888.ZPRYME.1 (+1 888.977.9631) www.smartgridresearch.org (Zpryme Smart Grid Insights) Zpryme Credits: Editor Managing Editor Research Lead Pimjai Hoontrakul Robert Langston Stefan Trifonov Disclaimer: These materials and the information contained herein are provided by Zpryme Research & Consulting, LLC and are intended to provide general information on a particular subject or subjects and is not an exhaustive treatment of such subject(s). Accordingly, the information in these materials is not intended to constitute accounting, tax, legal, investment, consulting or other professional advice or services. The information is not intended to be relied upon as the sole basis for any decision which may affect you or your business. Before making any decision or taking any action that might affect your personal finances or business, you should consult a qualified professional adviser. These materials and the information contained herein is provided as is, and Zpryme Research & Consulting, LLC makes no express or implied representations or warranties regarding these materials and the information herein. Without limiting the foregoing, Zpryme Research & Consulting, LLC does not warrant that the materials or information contained herein will be error-free or will meet any particular criteria of performance or quality. Zpryme Research & Consulting, LLC expressly disclaims all implied warranties, including, without limitation, warranties of merchantability, title, fitness for a particular purpose, noninfringement, compatibility, security, and accuracy. Prediction of future events is inherently subject to both known and unknown risks, uncertainties and other factors that may cause actual results to vary materially. Your use of these and the information contained herein is at your own risk and you assume full responsibility and risk of loss resulting from the use thereof. Zpryme Research & Consulting, LLC will not be liable for any special, indirect, incidental, consequential, or punitive damages or any other damages whatsoever, whether in an action of contract, statute, tort (including, without limitation, negligence), or otherwise, relating to the use of these materials and the information contained herein.11 www.zpryme.com | www.smartgridresearch.org Zpryme Smart Grid Insights. The Optimized Grid | July 2012Copyright © 2012 Zpryme Research & Consulting, LLC All rights reserved.
    • RETHINK RESEARCH [PREMIUM] Zpryme: Intelligent Research for an Intelligent Market 51 www.zpryme.com | www.smartgridresearch.org Zpryme Smart Grid Insights [PREMIUM] Energy Storage: Asian Systems & Apps | August 2012LEAN MORE @ www.zpryme.com | www.smartgridresearch.org LLC All rights reserved. | Do not distribute or copy the information contained in this Zpryme publication. Copyright © 2012 Zpryme Research & Consulting,