[Smart Grid Market Research] Smart Grid Hiring Trends Study (Part 2 of 2)- Zpryme Smart Grid Insights

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Qualification requirements for employment in the Smart Grid sector are rigorous, with many employers seeking candidates with advanced degrees, a host of ancillary certifications and highly specialized work experience. Those meeting these stringent standards are becoming a coveted group of highly sought after hires, and the cost of recruiting them is on the rise, as evidenced by increasing salaries and a more widespread use of hiring bonuses. Understanding the inherent challenges in recruiting and retaining this elusive group, some employers are beginning to tap into the new graduate pool of Smart Grid hopefuls. However, this strategy is not without its roadblocks, as comprehensive, Smart Grid curricula that incorporates the hands-on experience needed to fully develop a candidate’s skills is far from prolific

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[Smart Grid Market Research] Smart Grid Hiring Trends Study (Part 2 of 2)- Zpryme Smart Grid Insights

  1. 1. Executive Summary DefinitionsQualification requirements for employment in the Smart • New Hire: A candidate who has no previous workGrid sector are rigorous, with many employers seeking experience (outside internships).candidates with advanced degrees, a host of ancillarycertifications and highly specialized work experience. • Experienced New Hire: A candidate who hasThose meeting these stringent standards are becoming a previous relevant work experience.coveted group of highly sought after hires, and the cost ofrecruiting them is on the rise, as evidenced by increasing Key Findingssalaries and a more widespread use of hiring bonuses. 1.Understanding the inherent challenges in recruiting andretaining this elusive group, some employers are beginningto tap into the new graduate pool of Smart Grid hopefuls. Eighty-two percent of hiring managers indicatedHowever, this strategy is not without its roadblocks, as that new hires required at least a Bachelor’s degree to fillcomprehensive, Smart Grid curricula that incorporates the Smart Grid roles, 40% required a Master’s degree, and 27%hands-on experience needed to fully develop a required some type of additional Certification. 2.candidate’s skills is far from prolific.This report, outlining the findings of an inaugural study The required majors for Bachelor’s degrees wereconducted by Zpryme and Smart Grid Careers, provides most often electrical engineering, computer science/engineering, and business. Master degree majorpotential Smart Grid candidates with the detailed data requirements were the same: electrical engineering,they need to understand what it takes to break intoand/or advance their career in this dynamic industry computer science/engineering, and business. Certifications most often mentioned were Smart Grid,sector. Utility/GIS, Renewable Engineering, PMP, PJM, CE, Cyber Security, IT, and Communications.MethodologyThe Smart Grid Hiring Trends 2012 study was conducted bysurveying 184 Smart Grid hiring managers and executives 3. The top three additional skill requirements for new hires were analytical skills, problem-solving skills, andin June 2012. Only one response per company was attention to detail. When asked to rank all additional skills,allowed for the study. Only U.S.-based executives and the highest scores were given to: analytical skills andmanagers who played a role in making hiring decisions for problem-solving skills (first-place tie), and being a teamSmart Grid-related roles at their respective companies player.were allowed to respond to the survey.3 www.zpryme.com | www.smartgridresearch.org | www.smartgridcareers.com Smart Grid Hiring Trends Study (part 2 of 2) | August 2012Copyright © 2012 Zpryme Research & Consulting, LLC All rights reserved. | Brought to you by Zpryme & SmartGridCareers.com
  2. 2. 4. to: problem-solving skills, being a team player, and analytical skills. Among experienced new hires, the top threedemonstrated skill requirements beyond academicrequirements were: project management, consultingexperience, and supervisory/management experience.5. Years of experience that were needed by asuccessful experienced new hire were most often four tofive years (47%).6. Eighty-nine percent of hiring managers indicatedthat experienced new hires required at least a Bachelor’sdegree to fill Smart Grid roles, 49% required a Master’sdegree, and 34% required some type of additionalCertification. See pages 5 – 17 to learn more.7. Among experienced new hires, the required majorsfor bachelor’s degrees were most often electricalengineering, business, and computer science/engineering. Master degree major requirements were thesame: electrical engineering, business, and engineering.Certifications most often mentioned were PMP, PMI, CEM,Networks and Controls Systems, and Power Domain.8. The top three additional skill requirements forexperienced new hires were analytical skills, problem-solving skills, and good oral communication. When askedto rank all additional skills, the highest scores were given4 www.zpryme.com | www.smartgridresearch.org | www.smartgridcareers.com Smart Grid Hiring Trends Study (part 2 of 2) | August 2012Copyright © 2012 Zpryme Research & Consulting, LLC All rights reserved. | Brought to you by Zpryme & SmartGridCareers.com
  3. 3. Survey Respondent Characteristics Job TitleCompany Size The titles of those managers who responded were (in descending order of frequency): Director (39%); ManagerForty-one percent of hiring managers said they worked for (26%); Vice President (13%); CEO (9%); President (7%); andcompanies with 1 to 100 employees, 16% worked for Consultant (6%).companies with 101 to 500 employees, 6% worked forcompanies with 501 to 1,000 employees, and the Percent of Respondents by Job Titleremaining 37% said they worked for companies with 1,000 (figure 2, source: Zpryme & SmartGridCareers.com)or more employees. Percent of Respondents by Number of Employees in Their Company Manager, (figure 1, source: Zpryme & SmartGridCareers.com) 26% Director, 39% Consultant, 6% 1,000 or more, 37% 1 to 100, 41% Vice President, 13% President, CEO, 9% 7% 101 to 500, 16% 501 to 1,000, 6%5 www.zpryme.com | www.smartgridresearch.org | www.smartgridcareers.com Smart Grid Hiring Trends Study (part 2 of 2) | August 2012Copyright © 2012 Zpryme Research & Consulting, LLC All rights reserved. | Brought to you by Zpryme & SmartGridCareers.com
  4. 4. Type of Smart Grid Employees Hired Sectors Served by RespondentsAbout half (49%) of the hiring managers in the study said The hiring managers in the study represented 25 Smart Gridtheir company only hired experienced new hires with sectors. Sectors with the largest representation in the studyprevious work experience. The other half (51%) said they were AMI, distribution automation, demand response,hired both new hires without previous work experience utility systems, meter data management, network(outside internships) AND experienced new hires with management, communications, and utility operations.previous work experience. Sectors Served by Respondents (table 1, source: Zpryme & SmartGridCareers.com) What Type of Smart Grid Employees Does Your Company Hire Sector % of Respondents (figure 3, source: Zpryme & SmartGridCareers.com) AMI 62% Appliances 16% Battery technologies 19% (BAN/HAN), energy management systems 36% Only New Hires Community Energy Storage (CES) 22% Experienced without Chips 4% New Hires previous Communication (HW/SW/Control) 44% with work Consumer advocacy 18% previous experience Demand response 59% work AND Distributed automation: communications and software 61% experience, Experienced Distributed automation: hardware and sensors 47% 49% New Hires, Distributed generation and storage 33% 51% Electric vehicle technologies 30% FAN 10% GIS 29% Greentech: PV solar, storage 23% HVAC and building control systems 22% LAN 27% Meter data management (MDM) 47% NAN 20% Network management 47% Security 42% Smart meter manufacturers 32% Utility operations 43% Utility systems development/integration and consulting 50%6 www.zpryme.com | www.smartgridresearch.org | www.smartgridcareers.com Smart Grid Hiring Trends Study (part 2 of 2) | August 2012Copyright © 2012 Zpryme Research & Consulting, LLC All rights reserved. | Brought to you by Zpryme & SmartGridCareers.com
  5. 5. Academic Requirements and Skills for New Hires solving-skills (first-place tie), and being a team player.Overall, hiring managers indicated that the large majorityof their new hires are required to have a Bachelor’s What Are Your Academic/Certification Requirements for New Hires?degree. Analytical and problem skills were the top two (figure 4, source: Zpryme & SmartGridCareers.com)most desired additional skills required for new hires.Academic and Certification Requirements Bachelor’s degree 82% • Eighty-two percent of hiring managers indicated that new hires required at least a Bachelor’s degree Master’s degree 40% to fill Smart Grid roles, 40% required a Master’s degree, and 27% required some type of additional Certification 27% Certification. • The required majors for Bachelor’s degrees were Other 22% most often electrical engineering (11%), computer science/engineering (5%), and business (3%). Master 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% degree major requirements were the same: electrical engineering (5%), computer science/engineering (2%), and business (2%). Certifications most often mentioned were Smart Grid, Utility/GIS, Renewable Engineering, PMP, PJM, CE, Cyber Security, IT, and Communications.Additional Skills Required • The top three additional skill requirements for new hires were analytical skills, problem-solving skills, and attention to detail. • When asked to rank all additional skills, the highest scores were given to: analytical skills and problem7 www.zpryme.com | www.smartgridresearch.org | www.smartgridcareers.com Smart Grid Hiring Trends Study (part 2 of 2) | August 2012Copyright © 2012 Zpryme Research & Consulting, LLC All rights reserved. | Brought to you by Zpryme & SmartGridCareers.com
  6. 6. What Additional Skills are Required for New Hires? (figure 5, source: Zpryme & SmartGridCareers.com) Analytical skills 87% Problem-solving skills 86% Attention to detail 80% Good computer skills 75% Good written communication 71% Good oral communication 71% Team player 69% Taking initiative 62% Interpersonal skills 58% Customer focus/service skills 51% Business acumen/insights 51% Stress tolerance 35% Sales ability 26% 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% Ranking of Additional Skills for new hires? % Who Said Skill Was Most Important (figure 6, source: Zpryme & SmartGridCareers.com) Problem-solving skills 45% Analytical skills 45% Team player 43% Taking initiative 39% Attention to detail 37% Good oral communication 35% Good written communication 31% Good computer skills 31% Interpersonal skills 29% Customer focus/service skills 22% Stress tolerance 16% Sales ability 12% Business acumen/insights 12% 0% 20% 40% 60%8 www.zpryme.com | www.smartgridresearch.org | www.smartgridcareers.com Smart Grid Hiring Trends Study (part 2 of 2) | August 2012Copyright © 2012 Zpryme Research & Consulting, LLC All rights reserved. | Brought to you by Zpryme & SmartGridCareers.com
  7. 7. Academic Requirements and Skills for • When asked to rank all additional skills, the highestExperienced New Hires scores were given to: problem-solving skills, being a team player, and analytical skills.Overall, hiring managers indicated that the large majorityof experienced new hires are required to have a What Are Your Academic/CertificationBachelor’s degree, while just under half require a Master’s Requirements for Experienced New Hires?degree. Analytical and problem skills were the top two (figure 7, source: Zpryme & SmartGridCareers.com)most desired additional skills required by experienced newhires. Bachelor’s degree 89%Academic and Certification Requirements • Eighty-nine percent of hiring managers indicated Master’s degree 49% that experienced new hires required at least a Bachelor’s degree to fill Smart Grid roles, 49% Certification 34% required a Master’s degree, and 34% required some sort of additional Certification. Other 14% • The required majors for Bachelor’s degrees were most often electrical engineering (33%), business 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% (8%), and computer science/engineering (4%). Master degree major requirements were the same: electrical engineering (9%), business (8%), and engineering (general) (3%). Certifications most often mentioned were PMP, PMI, CEM, Networks and Controls Systems, and Power Domain.Additional Skills Required • The top three additional skill requirements for experienced new hires were analytical skills, problem-solving skills, and good oral communication.9 www.zpryme.com | www.smartgridresearch.org | www.smartgridcareers.com Smart Grid Hiring Trends Study (part 2 of 2) | August 2012Copyright © 2012 Zpryme Research & Consulting, LLC All rights reserved. | Brought to you by Zpryme & SmartGridCareers.com
  8. 8. What Additional Skills are Required for Demonstrated Skills Required Experienced New Hires? (figure 8, source: Zpryme & SmartGridCareers.com) • The top three demonstrated skill requirements Analytical skills 82% beyond academic requirements were: project Problem-solving skills 77% management (72%), consulting experience (63%), Good oral communication 77% and supervisory/management experience (53%). Good written communication 76% Team player 75% Years of Relevant Experience Required Attention to detail 71% Business acumen/insights 68% • Years of experience that were needed by a Interpersonal skills 67% successful experienced new hire were most often Good computer skills 67% 67% four to five years (47%). The second most frequent Customer focus/service skills experience requirement was six to 10 years (26%). Taking initiative 64% Stress tolerance 49% What Demonstrated Skill Sets are Required for Sales ability 47% Experienced New Hires? 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% (figure 10, source: Zpryme & SmartGridCareers.com) Ranking of Additional Skills for Experienced New Hires? Project management 72% % Who Said Skill Was Most Important (figure 9, source: Zpryme & SmartGridCareers.com) Consulting experience 63% Problem-solving skills 58% Team player 52% Management experience 53% Analytical skills 51% Software development 43% Taking initiative 46% Good oral communication 45% Software testing 34%Good written communication 39% Customer focus/service skills 38% Hardware development 24% Attention to detail 38% Hardware testing 23% Business acumen/insights 36% Interpersonal skills 34% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% Good computer skills 29% Stress tolerance 25% Sales ability 18% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70%10 www.zpryme.com | www.smartgridresearch.org | www.smartgridcareers.com Smart Grid Hiring Trends Study (part 2 of 2) | August 2012Copyright © 2012 Zpryme Research & Consulting, LLC All rights reserved. | Brought to you by Zpryme & SmartGridCareers.com
  9. 9. How Many Years of Relevant Experience are Required for Experienced New Hires? (figure 11, source: Zpryme & SmartGridCareers.com) Over 10, 8% 1, 4% 2 – 3, 15% 6 – 10, 26% 4 – 5, 47%11 www.zpryme.com | www.smartgridresearch.org | www.smartgridcareers.com Smart Grid Hiring Trends Study (part 2 of 2) | August 2012Copyright © 2012 Zpryme Research & Consulting, LLC All rights reserved. | Brought to you by Zpryme & SmartGridCareers.com
  10. 10. Conclusions & Recommendations universities has virtually stagnated, engineers of all types are in high demand across a wide variety of 1. Collegiate Smart Grid Hopefuls: Adopt the 6-to-8 industries. However, engineers pursuing a career in Year Plan the Smart Grid can expect to earn up to twenty percent more than their counterparts in other College students can increase their odds of industries. successfully landing a career in the Smart Grid by pursuing a Master’s degree immediately following 4. Going Above and Beyond: Laser-Focused Specialty the completion of their Bachelor’s degree. Forty Certification and Training percent of Smart Grid hiring managers require this additional education before they will even consider Hiring managers surveyed in this study listed a wide a candidate without work experience. variety of additional certifications and specialty training on their “must have” list for evaluating 2. Working Bachelors: Go Back to School potential hires. However, the question is where can a candidate get this training? Unfortunately, at this Candidates who have already joined the workforce early stage in curricula development, there isn’t a can open the door to incremental opportunities by national clearinghouse that offers a comprehensive pursuing a higher level of education. Forty-nine list of available training and/or educational percent of hiring managers are looking for a offerings. Candidates can start by researching the Master’s degree when seeking to bring on an programs funded by the DOE for Smart Grid experienced new hire. workforce training and development. Subsequent reports conducted by Zpryme and 3. Degree of Choice? Engineering, Engineering, SmartGridCareers.com will take a deeper dive into Engineering! the educational programs that are successfully producing candidates with the specialty training It should come as no surprise that most Smart Grid desired in this sector. roles require some sort of engineering background. It’s also no secret that electrical and computer 5. Honing Important Skills: The Importance of Seeking engineering knowledge is crucial to the Applicable Work Experience development of Smart Grid technologies. Both new graduates and those already in the workforce will Hiring managers sent a very clear message need this background to sustain successful careers regarding the importance of analytical and in this sector. As the number of engineering problem solving skills for both new and experienced graduates being turned out by U.S. colleges and Smart Grid hires. Candidates of all types should seek12 www.zpryme.com | www.smartgridresearch.org | www.smartgridcareers.com Smart Grid Hiring Trends Study (part 2 of 2) | August 2012Copyright © 2012 Zpryme Research & Consulting, LLC All rights reserved. | Brought to you by Zpryme & SmartGridCareers.com
  11. 11. out opportunities to hone these skills by pursuing internships and/or permanent roles where these skills can be exercised and developed. For those already in the workforce, hiring managers listed project management, consulting and management experience on their top three list for the most sought after demonstrated skill sets. Why? Project management skills are crucial in industries where new technologies are being developed at a very rapid pace, especially in industry segments where competition is prolific. These skills are also vital when there is a need to manage transformational change. The Smart Grid sector qualifies on both accounts. As for consulting experience, the desire for this skill set reflects the industry’s need to understand the full breadth of available technologies and their relevant applications. It’s the only way to stay ahead of the competition. The need for management skills is a good indication of future growth. Whether achieved organically, by raising capital or through acquisition, Smart Grid technology vendors are supporting their growth plans by adding human resources…offering both new and experienced hires limitless opportunity.13 www.zpryme.com | www.smartgridresearch.org | www.smartgridcareers.com Smart Grid Hiring Trends Study (part 2 of 2) | August 2012Copyright © 2012 Zpryme Research & Consulting, LLC All rights reserved. | Brought to you by Zpryme & SmartGridCareers.com
  12. 12. Q&A: EchelonJeff LundVP of Business Developmentwww.echelon.comZP: How should current university students be preparing fora career that works closely with the Smart Grid? JL: The smart grid is a very broad industry, with opportunities for student with both technical and business backgrounds. On the technical side, it is important for young engineers to understand more about the nature of the electric grid. The more they understand what “makes the grid tick”, the better prepared they will be to invent the new technologies needed to make the grid smarter and more efficient. Likewise for students interested in the business side of the smart grid, the more they understand about the market structure and economics of the smart grid, the better prepared they will be to construct business cases, devise product plans, and explain the benefits to regulators , consumers, and utilities.ZP: Do you foresee hiring for Smart Grid roles continuing toincrease in 2013? JL: We believe it will remain the same.14 www.zpryme.com | www.smartgridresearch.org | www.smartgridcareers.com Smart Grid Hiring Trends Study (part 2 of 2) | August 2012Copyright © 2012 Zpryme Research & Consulting, LLC All rights reserved. | Brought to you by Zpryme & SmartGridCareers.com
  13. 13. Q&A: Itron renewables, storage, etc.) shape the next phase of energy distribution and management.Tim WolfDirector of Smart Grid Solutionswww.itron.comZP: How should current university students be preparing fora career that works closely with the Smart Grid? TW: The smart grid transcends traditional organizational silos in utilities and fundamentally transforms the utility- customer relationship, and as a result, new skill sets and competencies will be required to successfully build, integrate and operate the modern grid. While traditional power engineering skills will still be in demand, increasing focus and value will be placed on IT-centered skills around system design, architecture, security and data management. In addition, innovative business, communication and collaboration skills will be critical to assuring cross-functional success. The ability to define new business processes, communicate and coordinate will be every bit as important to success in a smart grid world as engineering skills. University students should seek internships within the field during the summertime and stay on top of current events by joining different groups representing the smart grid.ZP: Do you foresee hiring for Smart Grid roles continuing toincrease in 2013? TW: Yes, as there will always be the need to keep up with new technologies as advancements in smart grid applications and assets (e.g. distribution automation,15 www.zpryme.com | www.smartgridresearch.org | www.smartgridcareers.com Smart Grid Hiring Trends Study (part 2 of 2) | August 2012Copyright © 2012 Zpryme Research & Consulting, LLC All rights reserved. | Brought to you by Zpryme & SmartGridCareers.com
  14. 14. Q&A: S&C Electric Company ZP: Do you foresee hiring for Smart Grid roles continuing to increase in 2013?Wanda RederVP of Power Systems Services WR: Absolutely. There has been a forecast of upwardswww.sandc.com of 50% of the power industry workforce to leave in the coming years. Some of this workforce has decided toZP: How should current university students be preparing for stay longer due to economy, but they will eventuallya career that works closely with the Smart Grid? want to retire and move on. This will leave a big hole in technical talent unless we begin hiring and training a WR: Due to the interdisciplinary nature of the Smart new generation of engineers today. Smart Grid jobs Grid, students should be taking power engineering are here, and they are here to stay. The hiring for these classes and seeking to diversify their educational Smart Grid jobs is happening and will continue to experience to gain knowledge in power electronics, increase in the future. renewables, communications, cyber security, environment, consumer behavior and networking which all play into the Smart Grid. They should also participate in internships to augment their classroom work with real world experience and access to the latest technologies. Students should also participate in industry organizations like IEEE where Smart Grid advancements are featured at conferences, highlighted through social media, featured on web-sites (eg. http://smartgrid.ieee.org/) and discussed in peer- reviewed publications. In doing so, students gain a broader perspective of the industry, develop a professional network, stay in touch with technical advancements, and develop an understanding of career opportunities. Finally, www.pes-careers.org is a great tool for power engineering students both in school and up to one year out of school to find and apply for Smart Grid-related jobs in the US and Canada.16 www.zpryme.com | www.smartgridresearch.org | www.smartgridcareers.com Smart Grid Hiring Trends Study (part 2 of 2) | August 2012Copyright © 2012 Zpryme Research & Consulting, LLC All rights reserved. | Brought to you by Zpryme & SmartGridCareers.com
  15. 15. Q&A: SiemensSiemens Smart Grid Divisionwww.siemens.comZP: How should current university students be preparing fora career that works closely with the Smart Grid? Siemens: Engineering degrees with focus on power systems, plus IT courses, software development and knowledge of the electrical grid - Masters preferred.ZP: Do you foresee hiring for Smart Grid roles continuing toincrease in 2013? Siemens: We see it as a global megatrend. The political, economic global climate will affect this positively and negatively but mostly agree the need for efficient and smart creation and consumption of electrical power is more critical every day which means the need for talent will continue far into the future. What an exciting industry to be in!17 www.zpryme.com | www.smartgridresearch.org | www.smartgridcareers.com Smart Grid Hiring Trends Study (part 2 of 2) | August 2012Copyright © 2012 Zpryme Research & Consulting, LLC All rights reserved. | Brought to you by Zpryme & SmartGridCareers.com
  16. 16. About Zpryme Smart Grid Insights Practice:Zpryme-powered Smart Grid Insight Practice (link) and our Smart GridInsights Advisory Board (link) help organizations understand theirbusiness environment, engage consumers, inspire innovation, andtake action. These practices represent an evolution beyond traditionalmarket research and consulting: combining sound fundamentals,innovative tools and methodologies, industry experience, andcreative marketing savvy to supercharge clients’ success. At Zpryme,we don’t produce tables and charts; we deliver opportunity-focused,actionable insight that is both engaging and easy-to-digest. For moreinformation regarding our custom research, visit: www.zpryme.com.Zpryme Smart Grid Insights Contact:smart.grid@zpryme.com | +1 888.ZPRYME.1 (+1 888.977.9631)www.smartgridresearch.org (Zpryme Smart Grid Insights)www.zpryme.com (Zpryme Main Website) Contributors:About SmartGridCareers.com: Echelon (Jeff Lund, VP of Business Development) Itron (Tim Wolf, Director of Smart Grid Solutions)SmartGridCareers.com is a niche recruiting firm offering a S&C Electric Company (Wanda Reder, VP of Power Systems Services)comprehensive suite of human resources solutions to the Smart Grid Siemens (Siemens Smart Grid Division)industry. Leveraging a powerful combination of experience, expertiseand cutting-edge technology, SmartGridCareers.com has established Disclaimer:a proven track record of pinpointing candidates with the emergingskill sets required by the Smart Grid and Renewable Energy sectors. For These materials and the information contained herein are provided by Zpryme Research & Consulting, LLC and are intended to provide general information on a particular subject or subjects and is not an exhaustive treatment ofmore information, visit: www.smartgridcareers.com. such subject(s). Accordingly, the information in these materials is not intended to constitute accounting, tax, legal, investment, consulting or other professional advice or services. The information is not intended to be relied upon as the sole basis for any decision which may affect you or your business. Before making any decision or taking any action that might affect your personal finances or business, you should consult a qualified professional adviser. TheseZpryme Credits: materials and the information contained herein is provided as is, and Zpryme Research & Consulting, LLC makes no express or implied representations or warranties regarding these materials and the information herein. Without limiting the foregoing, Zpryme Research & Consulting, LLC does not warrant that the materials or information contained herein will be error-free or will meet any particular criteria of performance or quality. Zpryme Research & Consulting,Editor Managing Editor Research Lead LLC expressly disclaims all implied warranties, including, without limitation, warranties of merchantability, title, fitness for a particular purpose, noninfringement, compatibility, security, and accuracy. Prediction of future events isPimjai Hoontrakul Robert Langston Stefan Trifonov inherently subject to both known and unknown risks, uncertainties and other factors that may cause actual results to vary materially. Your use of these and the information contained herein is at your own risk and you assume full responsibility and risk of loss resulting from the use thereof. Zpryme Research & Consulting, LLC will not be liable for any special, indirect, incidental, consequential, or punitive damages or any other damages whatsoever, whether in an action of contract, statute, tort (including, without limitation, negligence), or otherwise, relating to the use of these materials and the information contained herein.18 www.zpryme.com | www.smartgridresearch.org | www.smartgridcareers.com Smart Grid Hiring Trends Study (part 2 of 2) | August 2012Copyright © 2012 Zpryme Research & Consulting, LLC All rights reserved. | Brought to you by Zpryme & SmartGridCareers.com

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