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5 minute quiz<br />What is linguistics?<br />What is phonology?<br />Name one branch of linguistics and give a brief descr...
WHAT IS PHONETICS?<br />Phonetics is the study of speech sounds<br />There are three aspects to the study of speech sounds...
Articulatory Phonetics<br />articulatory phonetic: what is involved in the actual movement of various parts of the vocal t...
all speech sounds result from air being somehow obstructed or modified within the vocal tract. This involves 3 processes w...
Phonetics and phonology<br />IPA<br />The International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA)is the alphabetic system of phonetic notati...
English consonants<br />Consonants are speech sounds produced with a narrowing somewhere in the vocal tract. <br />When we...
1.Voiced vs. voiceless<br />When is a sound is voiced or voiced, it depends on the state of the glottis (المزمار – فتحة أع...
2. Place of articulation<br />Read page 51.<br />
3. Manner of articulation<br />Manner of articulation focus on how the airstream is modified by the vocal tract to produce...
Consonant chart<br />See page 54.<br />
Organs of speech<br />The Organs of Speech<br />1-nasal cavity2-lips3-teeth4-aveolar ridge5-hard palate6-velum (soft palat...
Practise<br />http://www.stuff.co.uk/calcul_nd.htm<br />http://wwwedu.ge.ch/cptic/prospective/projets/anglais/exercises/ph...
Vowels<br />There are two types of vowels:<br />-monophthongs: one part vowel<br />-diphthongs: two part vowels<br />Vowel...
Vowels<br />The IPA defines a vowel as a sound which occurs at a syllable center. Below is a chart depicting the vowels of...
Vowels-diphthongs<br />Diphthongs are two-part vowel sounds consisting of transition from one vowel to another. <br />Exam...
Vowels: Place of production<br />
Vowels chart<br />
Change from Ipa to normal writing<br />| ˈaɪɪnˈdʒoɪ ˈlɜːnɪŋəˈbaʊtlɪŋˈɡwɪstɪks | ɪt s ə ˈɡreɪtkɔːs |wɒt ˈaɪɪnˈdʒoɪðəməʊst s...
Exercice: transcribe the following <br />Dear daughter,<br />Thank you for your letter. It was a pleasure tohear your news...
Answer<br />| dɪə ˈdɔːtə |<br />θæŋkjufəjə ˈletə | ɪtwəz ə ˈpleʒətuhɪəjənjuːzəˈɡen | ˈaɪəm ˈwɜːkɪŋdeɪəndnaɪt |<br />ˈtraɪɪ...
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Week 3& 4 phonetics and phonology

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Transcript of "Week 3& 4 phonetics and phonology"

  1. 1. 5 minute quiz<br />What is linguistics?<br />What is phonology?<br />Name one branch of linguistics and give a brief description.<br />
  2. 2. WHAT IS PHONETICS?<br />Phonetics is the study of speech sounds<br />There are three aspects to the study of speech sounds:<br />- articulatory: the study of the production of speech sounds<br />-acoustic phonetics: the study of the transmission and the physical properties of speech sounds (e.g. intensity, duration)<br />-auditory phonetics: the study of the perception of speech sounds. <br />
  3. 3. Articulatory Phonetics<br />articulatory phonetic: what is involved in the actual movement of various parts of the vocal tract during speech: organs of speech; oral, pharyngeal and nasal cavities; articulators, lungs and diaphragm)<br />
  4. 4. all speech sounds result from air being somehow obstructed or modified within the vocal tract. This involves 3 processes working together:<br />a) the airstream process--the source of air used in making the sound.<br />b) the phonation process--the behavior of the vocal cords in the glottis during the production of the sound.<br />c) the oro-nasal process--the modification of that flow of air in the vocal track (from the glottis to the lips and nose).<br />
  5. 5. Phonetics and phonology<br />IPA<br />The International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA)is the alphabetic system of phonetic notation based primarily on the Latin alphabet. It was devised by the International Phonetic Association as a standardized representation of the sounds of spoken language.The IPA is used by foreign language students and teachers, linguists, speech therapists, singers, actors, lexicographers, artificial language enthusiasts, and translators.<br />
  6. 6. English consonants<br />Consonants are speech sounds produced with a narrowing somewhere in the vocal tract. <br />When we describe a consonant, we need to provide THREE pieces of information:<br />- Is the sound voiced or voiceless?<br />- Where is the airstream constricted (i.e. the place of articulation)<br />- How is the airstream constricted? (i.e manner of articulation).<br />
  7. 7. 1.Voiced vs. voiceless<br />When is a sound is voiced or voiced, it depends on the state of the glottis (المزمار – فتحة أعلى الحنجرة). At the bottom of the glottis, we find the vocal cords. When the vocal cords vibrate, the sound is voiced. If they don’t vibrate, the sound produced is voiceless.<br />Examples: p. 50<br />
  8. 8. 2. Place of articulation<br />Read page 51.<br />
  9. 9. 3. Manner of articulation<br />Manner of articulation focus on how the airstream is modified by the vocal tract to produce the sound:<br />Types: stops, fricative, affricates, nasals, liquids and glides. Read pages. 52-53.<br />
  10. 10. Consonant chart<br />See page 54.<br />
  11. 11. Organs of speech<br />The Organs of Speech<br />1-nasal cavity2-lips3-teeth4-aveolar ridge5-hard palate6-velum (soft palate)7-uvula8-apex (tip) of tongue9-blade (front) of tongue10-dorsum (back) of tongue11-oral cavity12-pharynx13-epiglottis14-larynx15-vocal cords16-trachea17-esophagus<br />
  12. 12. Practise<br />http://www.stuff.co.uk/calcul_nd.htm<br />http://wwwedu.ge.ch/cptic/prospective/projets/anglais/exercises/phonetic1.htm<br />
  13. 13. Vowels<br />There are two types of vowels:<br />-monophthongs: one part vowel<br />-diphthongs: two part vowels<br />Vowels (monophthongs) are affected by: tongue height, tonge advancement, lip rounding, and tenseness.<br />Read pp. 67-58 for details.<br />
  14. 14. Vowels<br />The IPA defines a vowel as a sound which occurs at a syllable center. Below is a chart depicting the vowels of the IPA. The IPA maps the vowels according to the position of the tongue.<br />The vertical axis of the chart is mapped by vowel height. Vowels pronounced with the tongue lowered are at the bottom, and vowels pronounced with the tongue raised are at the top. For example, [ɑ](said as the "a" in "palm") is at the bottom because the tongue is lowered in this position. However, [i] (said as the vowel in "meet") is at the top because the sound is said with the tongue raised to the roof of the mouth.<br />In a similar fashion, the horizontal axis of the chart is determined by vowel backness. Vowels with the tongue moved towards the front of the mouth (such as [ɛ], the vowel in "met") are to the left in the chart, while those in which it is moved to the back (such as [ʌ], the vowel in "but") are placed to the right in the chart.<br />In places where vowels are paired, the right represents a rounded vowel (in which the lips are rounded) while the left is its unrounded counterpart.<br />
  15. 15. Vowels-diphthongs<br />Diphthongs are two-part vowel sounds consisting of transition from one vowel to another. <br />Example: when saying the word ‘eye’ slowly, you notice that your tongue starts from low-back position for [a] and moves towards high position [ɪ]<br />
  16. 16. Vowels: Place of production<br />
  17. 17. Vowels chart<br />
  18. 18. Change from Ipa to normal writing<br />| ˈaɪɪnˈdʒoɪ ˈlɜːnɪŋəˈbaʊtlɪŋˈɡwɪstɪks | ɪt s ə ˈɡreɪtkɔːs |wɒt ˈaɪɪnˈdʒoɪðəməʊst s fəˈnetɪks | ɪt ˈstʌdɪz ˈhaʊsaʊndz |ə prəˈdjuːstɪnðəmaʊθ |<br />For more fun, visit this website and enjoy transcribing<br />http://www.photransedit.com/Online/Text2Phonetics.aspx<br />
  19. 19. Exercice: transcribe the following <br />Dear daughter,<br />Thank you for your letter. It was a pleasure tohear your news again. I am working day and night trying to get used to this country. Life can be tough at times. But, I am enjoying the experience.<br />Talk soon,<br />Dad<br />
  20. 20. Answer<br />| dɪə ˈdɔːtə |<br />θæŋkjufəjə ˈletə | ɪtwəz ə ˈpleʒətuhɪəjənjuːzəˈɡen | ˈaɪəm ˈwɜːkɪŋdeɪəndnaɪt |<br />ˈtraɪɪŋtuɡet ˈjuːsttuðɪs ˈkʌntri | laɪfkən bi tʌfət ˈtaɪmz | bʌt | ˈaɪəmɪnˈdʒoɪɪŋðiɪkˈspɪərɪəns |<br />ˈtɔːksuːn |<br />dæd |<br />
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