• Like

Loading…

Flash Player 9 (or above) is needed to view presentations.
We have detected that you do not have it on your computer. To install it, go here.

Ferrous Metal and Non-Ferrous Metal for Design and Technology

  • 7,314 views
Published

 

Published in Education , Business
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Be the first to comment
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
7,314
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0

Actions

Shares
Downloads
272
Comments
0
Likes
3

Embeds 0

No embeds

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide
  • Activity: Give examples of metal. Nails, can, kitchen utensils… Where does metal come from? Ores from the ground/sea bed
  • Activity: Give examples of metal. Nails, can, kitchen utensils… Where does metal come from? Ores from the ground/sea bed
  • Slides 9 Girders – support beams e.g bridges, building Brittle – easily cracked Wire ropes – Lathes – cutting machine e.g drilling machine
  • Slides 10 Mould dies –
  • Statue

Transcript

  • 1. Starter Activity
    • Divide yourself into 3 groups and write and
    • draw at least 5 items/products made of metal
    • on the given post-it note
    • Duration: 10 mins
  • 2. HEAT ELECTRICITY Toughness Hardness
  • 3. ALLOY FERROUS METAL NON- FERROUS METAL
  • 4. FERROUS METAL Rust Iron Attracted to magnet
  • 5. FERROUS METAL High Harder
  • 6. FERROUS METAL Name Properties Uses Low Carbon Steel (Mild Steel) (Carbon 0.1%-0.3%) (iron + carbon)
    • Fairly Strong
    • Rusts easily
    girders, car body panels, nuts and bolts, Food cans, car body panels Medium Carbon Steels (Carbon 0.3%-0.7%) (iron + carbon)
    • Harder than low carbon steel
    Nails and screws, metal chains, wire ropes, screwdriver blades, engine parts, bicycle wheel rims High Carbon Steel (tool steel) (Carbon 0.7%-1.3%) (iron + carbon)
    • Harder than medium carbon steel
    • Brittle
    Chisels, hammers, drills, files, lathe tools, taps and dies. High Speed Steel (Carbon 0.6%) (iron + carbon + tungsten + chromium)
    • Harder and more lasting than high carbon steel
    • Can retain its hardness at high temperature (700 °C)
    Cutting tools for lathes and drill bits
  • 7. FERROUS METAL Name Properties Uses Stainless Steel (Carbon 0.2%) (iron + carbon + nickel + chromium)
    • Hard and tough
    • Polishes well
    • Resistant to corrosion and rust
    Cutlery, kitchen utensils and appliances, sinks, surgical instruments Cast Iron (Carbon 2%-4%) (iron + carbon)
    • Hard and brittle
    • Rusts easily
    Car engine blocks Manhole covers Engineer’s vice
  • 8. Activity
    • Pick and choose the items that you have written
    • at the 1st activity to the correct column
    • Duration: 10 mins
  • 9. Ferrous Metals CAST IRON
  • 10. Ferrous Metals LOW CARBON STEEL
  • 11. Ferrous Metals MEDIUM CARBON STEEL
  • 12. Ferrous Metals HIGH CARBON STEEL
  • 13. Ferrous Metals HIGH SPEED STEEL
  • 14. Ferrous Metals STAINLESS STEEL
  • 15. NON-FERROUS METALS Non-ferrous metals do not have iron in them. Therefore they do not rust and are not attracted to magnets .
  • 16. NON-FERROUS METALS Most non-ferrous metals are soft . By ‘ alloying ’ with other materials, they form new materials and become stronger for further applications. These are known also as ‘ non-ferrous alloys ’.
  • 17. NON-FERROUS METALS Name Properties Uses ALUMINIUM (Pure metal)
    • Greyish-white colour
    • The second most widely used metal after steel
    • Lightweight
    • Good conductor of electricity and heat
    • Easy to cut and machine.
    Engine parts Cooking foil Drink cans Overhead power cables Road signs COPPER (Pure metal)
    • Reddish-brown colour
    • Ductile
    • Malleable
    • Excellent conductor of heat and electricity
    Electrical fitting and wires Tips of soldering iron Domestic water pipes Cooking utensils
  • 18. NON-FERROUS METALS Name Properties Uses TIN (Pure metal)
    • Silvery-white colour
    • Non-toxic
    • Soft
    Tinplate from which food cans are made Coating or printed circuit boards ZINC (Pure metal)
    • Silvery-blue colour
    • Ductile but rather weak
    • Good corrosion resistance
    Manufacture of galvanised iron Batteries Rust-proof paints Roof LEAD (Pure metal)
    • Bluish-grey colour when cut but surface changes quickly to a dull grey
    • Heavy but soft
    • Resistant to corrosion
    • Toxic
    Core of some batteries Can be mixed with other protection against x-rays and radiation Weights Solder
  • 19. NON-FERROUS ALLOYS Name Properties Uses DURALUMIN (Alloy – mixture of aluminium, copper and manganese)
    • Silvery-white colour
    • Non-toxic
    • Soft
    Aircraft and vehicle parts Portable ladders Door and window frames Rivets BRASS (Alloy – mixture of copper and zinc)
    • Golden-yellow colour
    • Good conductor of heat and electricity
    • Easy to machine and solder
    Musical instruments Pins of electrical plugs Nuts, bolts and screws Hingers Decorative artefacts Locks Keys
  • 20. NON-FERROUS ALLOYS Name Properties Uses BRONZE (Alloy – mixture of copper and tin)
    • Reddish-yellow colour
    • Corrosion resistant
    • Easily machined
    ship propellers Bells Gears Bearings Statues PEWTER (Alloy – mixture of copper, tin and antimony)
    • Silvery colour
    • Soft and malleable
    Ornaments such as plaques, vases, mugs and souvenirs
  • 21. Non-Ferrous Metals ALUMINIUM
  • 22. Non-Ferrous Metals COPPER
  • 23. Non-Ferrous Metals TIN
  • 24. Non-Ferrous Metals ZINC
  • 25. Non-Ferrous Metals LEAD
  • 26. Non-Ferrous Alloys DURALUMIN
  • 27. Non-Ferrous Alloys BRASS
  • 28. Non-Ferrous Alloys BRONZE
  • 29. Non-Ferrous Alloys PEWTER