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Ucla Cdh

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Presented at UC Computing Services Conference (UC-Riverside) 2004 …

Presented at UC Computing Services Conference (UC-Riverside) 2004
http://uccsc.ucr.edu/2004/index.php?content=presentations.php

Published in: Education, Technology

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  • Transcript

    • 1. UCLA Center for Digital Humanities Practical Use of Digital Media: Heritage Language Learners and GE Courses at UCLA
    • 2. CDH Heritage Language Reading Project Hypermedia Berlin
    • 3. background
      • Academic Services
        • Labs
        • Course Websites
        • Projects
      • User Services
      • Network Services
    • 4. CDH Projects
      • Applications once a year
      • Project Team:
      • Eugene Hamai
      • Project Technical Coordinator
      • Shawn Higgins
      • Media Specialist
      • Brian Lin
      • Media Assistant
    • 5. Heritage Language Reading Project
      • Heritage Language Students – a definition
      • A student who is raised in a home where a non-English language is spoken, who speaks or merely understands the heritage language, and who is to some degree bilingual in English and the heritage language
      • Limited ability to read and write the heritage language
    • 6. Heritage Language Reading Project
      • Goals
        • Provide on-line multi-media materials to teach reading to students with oral proficiency in Thai and Korean
        • Self-paced, self-correcting exercises
    • 7. HLRP: Challenges
      • Thai and Korean are Less Commonly Taught Languages
      • Instructors had different pedagogical approaches
      • Thai has fives tones, only four of which are marked--how important to heritage learners?
      • Technical staff did not read the languages
      • Instructors were not used to working with technology
      • Grant proposal (funded by Dept of Ed.) was with minimal input from technologists
    • 8. HLRP: technology
      • Why Flash?
        • Hidden “requirements”:
          • Desire for more complicated and interactive exercises
            • Heritage learners ARE tech-savvy audience
          • Cross-platform and cross-browser
            • Font representation
            • Exercise layout and functionality
          • No keyboard input – heritage students do not type in target language
    • 9. Heritage Language Reading Project
      • the heritage site
      • Teach, Practice, Test
      • Beginning – Intermediate levels
        • Vowels & Consonants
        • Words,
        • Sentences
        • Short Stories
    • 10. HLRP: What we learned
      • Get involved early: preferably when proposal is written
      • Be realistic: One language would have been better
      • Establish roles (e.g. who finds images) at the beginning
          • Technical staff cannot proofread a language they do not understand
          • PIs should sign off on grad student work before implementing
      • Test new material on paper—content proofing takes time
    • 11. Heritage Language Reading Project
      • What worked well
        • Interactive exercises: Flash & action scripting
        • Student programmer who knew the language and learned the technology
        • Authentic content: stories about other Heritage students
        • Common spelling mistakes
    • 12. Hypermedia Berlin Asst. Prof. Todd Presner (Germanic)
    • 13. Hypermedia Berlin
      • Revamp a GE course using digital technology
      • Interdisciplinary: incorporate art history, history, literature, architecture, film
      • Focus on context as well as text: teach the city in both time and place
      • Use the site in the classroom, i.e., lecture from it
      • Integrate student projects
    • 14. Berlin: the technologies
      • Need to navigate in both space and time
        • Flash
        • Zoomify
      • Hypermedia Berlin
    • 15. Berlin: The Challenges
      • GSRs with no technical expertise
        • Create content templates in Dreamweaver
        • Enlist the help of tech savvy itcs during lab sessions
      • Undergraduates asked: does this class have a text? Is this a lit class?
        • Mixture of traditional and new media assignments
    • 16. Hypermedia Berlin
      • Why did it work?
        • Faculty buy-in; Presner had tried before and was less successful
        • We used technology that GSR could learn to add content: opened our lab as a project workspace, spent our time teaching
        • We used technology that students could learn to add content
    • 17. Summary
      • Humanities scholarship has fundamentally changed: instruction needs to keep pace
      • Students taking humanities courses have changed (many more come from Heritage backgrounds)
      • Interdisciplinary courses require multi-media on demand—not just in the lab
      • Initially students will ask:
        • where’s the text?
        • but eventually:
        • why should we write papers when we can contribute our own digital projects?
      • Sometimes, we can make it work!