Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
  • Like
Intro To Expositions
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×

Now you can save presentations on your phone or tablet

Available for both IPhone and Android

Text the download link to your phone

Standard text messaging rates apply

Intro To Expositions

  • 680 views
Published

 

Published in Education , Technology
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
  • enna ithu
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Be the first to like this
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
680
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0

Actions

Shares
Downloads
22
Comments
1
Likes
0

Embeds 0

No embeds

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Expositions
  • 2. Expositions
    • GENERAL GUIDELINES
    • The purpose of such an essay is to DEFEND or ATTACK
    • An opinion
    • and CONVINCE the reader of your point of view.
  • 3. Expoisitions
    • GENERAL GUIDELINES
    • Essays of this kind require a great deal of PLANNING,
    • CLEAR REASONING and
    • CAREFUL ANALYSIS.
  • 4. Expositions
    • GENERAL GUIDELINES
    • This kind of essay requires you to take a particular stand for or against the given proposition.
    • You have to state your stand clearly and go all out to prove it by means of relevant arguments and examples.
  • 5. Expositions
    • GENERAL GUIDELINES
    • Remember to present both sides of the picture , otherwise, your arguments will appear biased and ill-considered.
    • Ensure that you present your stand in a consistent manner so that your conclusion appears to be inevitable rather than forced.
    • And use lots of relevant facts and statistics to support your claims.
  • 6. Expositions
    • Exams are unnecessary—they hinder rather than aid learning. What do you think?
    • OUTLINE
    • INTRO:
    • 1. Today’s competitive society makes it imperative to do well in exams.
  • 7. Expositions
    • Exams are unnecessary—they hinder rather than aid learning. What do you think?
    • OUTLINE
    • BODY:
    • The nature of exams makes them tests of memory rather than knowledge.
    • Conditions may hinder optimum performance during exams.
  • 8. Expositions
    • Exams are unnecessary—they hinder rather than aid learning. What do you think?
    • OUTLINE
    • BODY:
    • 3. Unfair that future hinges on performance during three hours when you study for a year
  • 9. Expositions
    • Exams are unnecessary—they hinder rather than aid learning. What do you think?
    • OUTLINE
    • CONCLUSION:
    • 1. Educationists need to come up with a better method of assessing knowledge acqusition.
  • 10. Expositions
    • P.E.E.L
    • Point
    • Evidence
    • Elaboration
    • Link
  • 11. Expositions
    • INTRODUCTION:
    • Come October, every student in Singapore walks under a dark and menacing cloud; it is that time of the year again—exam time! One would think they were about to be shot! The tension exams exert on students is very great in a competitive and meritocratic society like Singapore. The need to succeed is great and paper qualifications are of utmost importance.
    Thesis Statement
  • 12. Expositions
    • BODY:
    • However, what exactly do exams prove? That you can remember so many facts and figures? Or that you can write so many pages within a fixed period of time? Other than that, I feel exams do not prove much else. It just reflects the student’s capacity to throw up on the answer sheet all that he has crammed in the previous weeks.
    Rhetorical questions (evidence) Link back to the proposition. ‘Exams are unnecessary.’ Point
  • 13. Expositions
    • BODY: Once the exams are over, we conveniently forget all that we’ve learnt. This is because we’ve learnt it not for that sake of acquiring knowledge, but for answering the questions in the exam paper. Once that goal is achieved, all the information is deleted. Thus, what is the point of having an exam if you will not or cannot remember what you have learnt?
    Point Evidence Elaboration Link back to the proposition. ‘Exams are unnecessary.’
  • 14. Expositions
    • BODY: By forcing students to resort to rote learning, because exams usually have questions to which there can be only one correct answer, exams kill the creative instinct in students. They no longer need to exercise their intelligence to seek alternative answers, they only need to regurgitate THE answer.
    Point Evidence Elaboration Link back to the proposition. ‘Exams are unnecessary.’
  • 15. Expositions
    • BODY: This being the case, students who have good memory skills will benefit, while others with intelligence but no capacity to learn by heart will lose out. Moreover, conditions during exams may be adverse to recalling all that has been learnt. The student may not be feeling well, or may be under some psychological pressure. If this is the case, his intelligence will not be reflected in his final score. A whole year’s work is at the mercy of a few hours’ of scribbling.
    Evidence Elaboration Point Link back to the proposition. ‘Exams are unnecessary.’
  • 16. Expositions
    • CONCLUSION: Thus, we see that exams are not a test of intelligence or applicability of knowledge acquired. Rather, they are a test of memory and the ability to write fast. Educationists need to come up with a better method of assessing a student’s level of development and ability.
    Summation of main points
  • 17.
    • June 1988 ‘O’ Level Paper 1
    • You are advised to spend about 30 minutes on this part of the paper.
    • NEW HOUSING
    • There is a plan to build some new housing. You have been asked to give your views. Using some of the following notes and adding other points if you wish, argue for or against the scheme.
    Expositions
  • 18. Expositions Reasons for
    • New clinic and school
    • Good bus service
    • Bigger shopping center
    • Good water supply
    • Good for local business
    Reasons against
    • Site too close to existing buildings
    • High prices probable
    • Roads too busy
    • Dangerous for children
    • Good farming land lost
  • 19. Expositions Reasons for
    • P- New clinic and school
    • E- Where ever there are new residential areas, more schools and clinics will spring up to meet the needs of the residents.
    • E- This means that existing residents in that area will also benefit from such new ammenities.
    • L- Therefore, I feel that it would be advantages to build some housing.