Computerized Facilities Management Systems
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Computerized Facilities Management Systems

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My thesis was published as a book [ISBN # 978-3-8383-2341-1] by LAMBERT Academic Publishing of Germany and can be purchased on www.amazon.com or http://www.beck-shop.de.

My thesis was published as a book [ISBN # 978-3-8383-2341-1] by LAMBERT Academic Publishing of Germany and can be purchased on www.amazon.com or http://www.beck-shop.de.

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  • CPMS Capital Planning and Management Solutions This is a web-based facility capital-planning system which can track all facilities issues and assign values to them and provides a database to the specific departments for use in budget planning. CMMS Computerized Maintenance Management System . This application helps in keeping a record of work order and tracks maintenance technicians’ performance. CAFM Computer Aided Facilities Management . This system helps in managing a space and assets database. CAFM links together the communication network, graphic and other non-graphic database in one package for easy access, update or exchange through a computer network. CIFM Computer Integrated Facilities Management . This application makes it possible to link different databases such as finances, information technology, and human resources, into one system in the organization. CIFM system is a great resource for historical reports, financial analysis, and comparative data analysis. IM Infrastructure Management . This is the newest trend in applications. It extends facilities management beyond real estate and addresses the relationships between people, locations, and assets at once. IM makes it possible to manage data, telecommunication, different applications, and project management as an integrated package. FAM Facilities Assets Management . This is a hybrid combination of engineering, finances, and basic business management. It controls the overall performance of an organization and its physical assets.

Computerized Facilities Management Systems Computerized Facilities Management Systems Presentation Transcript

  •  
  • Acknowledgments
    •   I would like to express my appreciation to all Facilities Management faculty members who helped me reshape my professional profile and generously shared their knowledge and experience with me .
    • Special thanks to Professor Mary J. Matthews, Chair of the FM & CM Departments, who encouraged me to enroll in this program, and to Professor Richard Nasereddin, co-Chair of the FM Department and my thesis supervisor, for his professional and cordial support during my study time and my work on this thesis.
    • And many thanks to professor Russell Olson for his exceptional support during this work, especially in going through CAFM’s complexities.
  • STUDY FOR THE IMPLEMENTATION OF A COMPUTERIZED FACILITY MANAGEMENT SYSTEM FOR THE MUSEUM OF THE HUDSON HIGHLANDS Part One: Facility Management, Information Technology & CAFM Part Two: Presentation of the Museum of the Hudson Highlands Part Three: Computer-Aided Management for the Museum of the Hudson Highlands
    • Long-range Facility Planning
    • Strategic Master Planning
    • Facility Financial Forecasting and Budgeting
    • Acquisition, Utilization, Redeployment
    • Maintenance and Disposal of Assets
    • Renovation, New Construction, Architecture
    • Engineering, Planning, and Design
    • Interior Design, Space Planning, Workplace Specifications
    • Furniture and Equipment Installation and Space Management
    • Telecommunications and Cable Management
    • Human Resources, Security, General Administration
    • Mergers and Acquisitions
    • Predictive, Preventive, and Demand Maintenance
    Facilities Managers Activities and Responsibilities
    • Managing facilities today is a multitasking job. The knowledge required is a combination of: architecture, engineering, finances, information, telecommunication, and human management.
    • In 1999 the International Facilities Managers Association (IFMA) published an outline of activities and responsibilities for facility managers. These responsibilities lay in the following functional areas:
  • Facilities Managers Job Complexity FACILITIES MANAGERS BUSINESS & ORGANIZATION BEHAVIOUR BUILDING SPACE & PEOPLES MGMT BUILDING TECHNOLOGY & TELECOMMUNICATION FINANCES & BUDGETING PROPERTY PORTFOLIO AND LEASING ISSUES FINANCES AND AUDITING PLANNING AND BUDGETING ACCOUNTING FINANCE STRATEGY AND TACTICS PEOPLE SKILLS OUTSOURCING AND MARKETING BUILDING SERVICES SECURITY ISUES SAFETY AND HEALTH ISSUES, SPACE MANAGEMENT, RENOVATION, RELOCATION, OUTSOURCING, LEASING, DISPOSAL, FURNITURE AND EQUIPMENT MGMT, BUILDING FABRICS MAINTENANCE, INTERIOR DESIGN BUSINESS STRATEGY ORGANIZATIONBEHAVIOUR FACILITIES STRATEGIC AND TACTICAL PLANNING CORPORATE POLICIES AND PROCEDURES ENVIRONMENTAL REGULATIONS ERGONOMIC ISSUES PROJECT MGMT BUILDING DESIGN INTERIOR DECORATION CONSTRUCTION PROJECT TELECOMMUNICATION INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY COMMUNICATION HUMAN RECOURCES CUSTOMMER SERVICES OSHA REGULATION
  • Increasing Role of FM s in an Organization (US)
  • FMs role slightly differ in the US and in Japan
    • “ FM combines proven management practices with the most current technical knowledge to provide human and effective work environments.
    • It is the business practice of planning, providing and managing productive work environments."
    • "FM is total strategic corporate management practice of planning, managing and providing the highest and best use of all facilities and work environments".
    IFMA of the US definition Japan's JFMA's definition
  • Since 1997, Japanese candidates for professional FM certification (which is valid only for five years) have to take an exam on the following subjects: About Facility Management in Japan (1) The additional requirement for certification holders is to attend, during the validation period, professional seminars organized by JFMA
    • Real estate acquisition
    • Facility planning
    • Facility management strategy
    • Lease portfolio
    • Project administration
    • Operation and maintenance
    • Quality assessment
    • Human and environmental
    • factors
  • Facility Management in Japan (2) The 1997 JFMA Conference in Hong Kong introduced computer-aided techniques for FM’s training, focusing on the decision making process, not on space management. INPUTS FOR DECISION MAKING SIMULATION PROCESSOR CAFM APPLIC. PERSONNEL DATABASE FINANCIAL DATABASE MARKETINGDATABASE
  • Development of the Information Systems(1)
    • IS development began in the 1950’s. The information systems were semi-automatic and hardware was called electronic accounting machines (EAM)
    • IS focused on routine paper work time reduction (especially in accounting processes).
    • At that time electronic data processing (EDP) software was introduced.
    • In the 1960’s, need for the support of the management decision process forced development of the management information system (MIS).
    • MIS supported accounting activities and helped to prepare financial and manufacturing reports; it was also used for keeping a record of inventories .
    • In the early 1980’s the decision-support systems (DSS) and executive support systems (ESS) were developed. The general objectives of these systems were to improve the decision-making process, and to speed data-accessing time .
    • In the mid-1980’s, the concept of Information Systems changed again and has begun playing a strategic role in global competition.
    • At this time new systems of marketing, management, and communication emerged.
    Development of the Information Systems(2)
    • In 1970-1980’s the data processing (EDP) system was replaced by the customized management control systems (CMCS) (more tactical) which could collect, store and process data. This system is still in use today.
  • Business Architecture Business distinguishes four levels of management; each can use a specific type of IS that corresponds to a particular level of the organization.
    • Executive Support Systems (ESS) - Strategic Level
    • Management Information Systems (MIS) & Decision Support Systems (DSS) - M anagement Level
    • Knowledge Work Systems (KWS) & Office Automation Systems (OAS) - Knowledge Level
    • Transaction Processing Systems (TPS) - O perational Level
    IV. PERATIONAL LEVEL III.KNOWLEDGE LEVEL II. MANAGEMENT LEVEL I. STRATEGIC LEVEL SENIOR MANAGERS MIDDLE MANAGERS KNOWLEDGE AND DATA WORKERS OPERATION MANAGERS V. USED AT ALL LEVELS: INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY, INFORMATION SYSTEMS, TELECOMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGY, COLLECTIBLE DATA, AND INFORMATION
  • Elements of Modern Business Systems Introduction of the Internet, Intranet, and Extranet in the last decade have enabled the flow of data and information throughout the enterprise sectors as never before, and initiated the growth of e-business, e-commerce, and business-to-business (b-2-b) commerce and recently e-trade. Core business systems
    • Internet
    • Intranet
    • Extranet
  • What is the Intranet?
    • Intranet is a LAN, but connection is through the TCP/IP protocol and the system uses Web browsers, and HTTP file transfer protocol.
    • Security is provided by firewall software.
    The Internet Public Network INTRANET SERVER TCP/IP + http://www.
  • What is the Extranet?
    • This is a corporate network which is replacing WAN
    CORPORATE
  • Threats and Challenges for CEOs in the IS
    • The development of Information Systems has brought both challenges and threats for management.
    • The threats come from the overwhelming power of the I S, which might overrule the CEOs, causing dangerous or devastating consequences for their businesses.
    • The challenge is how to protect business and human factors against the unpredictable behavior of the now gigantic IS.
    • CHALLENGES
    • THREATS
  • How CAFM Software is Used
  • CAFM Categories on the Market
    • CPMS - Capital Planning and Management Solutions
    • CMMS - Computerized Maintenance Management System.
    • CAFM - Computer Aided Facilities Management
    • CIFM - Computer Integrated Facilities Management.
    • IM - Infrastructure Management
    • FAM - Facilities Assets Management
  • CAFM Development 6. VISUAL INFRASTRUCTURE MGMT ENVIRONMENTS WITH DISINTERMEDIATION AND CONSUMER INTEGRATION (LATE 1990s) 3. LAN BASED CAFM AND INDEPENDENT (BUT RELATED) AUTOMATED MANAGEMENT APPLICATIONS (1980) 4. ENTERPRISE BASED COMPUTER INTEGRATED FM (CIFM LATE 1980s) 5. FM CYBERSPACE WITH WWW INTER-ORGANIZATION CONNECTIVITY (1990s) 7. VIRTUAL FACILITY LIFE CYCLE MANAGEMENT, E-FM & E-SPACE (2000s) 2. FACILITIES AND OFFICE WORK AUTOMATION SYSTEM (LIMITED CAFM BEGINS, 1970) FACILITY AND ACCOUNTING AUTOMATION MANAGEMENT (NON-INTEGRATED SYSTEMS) CAFM STARTED IN 1960’s
  • CAFM Vendors
    • Vendors offer :
    • a “turn-key”system which includes in the contract: hardware, software and installation
    • Staff training
    • Future updates and maintenance
    • Other option is to bay just
    • Software
    • A CAFM package for the company’s existing computer systems.
  • The Museum of the Hudson Highlands
    • The Museum offers educational programs and lectures for schools and other organizations throughout the Hudson Valley region.
    • The Museum has two facilities in two separate locations: at Kenridge Farm on Rte. 9W in Cornwall and on the Boulevard in Cornwall-on-Hudson.
    • The Museum administrative and education offices, and the art gallery are located at the Museum of the Hudson Highlands at Kenridge Farm (presented here).
  • The Boulevard Facility of the Museum of the HH
    • The Museum’s on the Boulevard in Cornwall-on-Hudson ( shown here) has classrooms, educational wetlands, and several miles of natural trails surrounding the facility
    • The mission of the Museum of the Hudson Highlands is to foster and develop knowledge about, and appreciation of, the natural history, environment and culture of the Hudson River Valley.
  • The MHH Organization Chart
  • The MHH Management Problems (1)
    • A. The Communication Problem
    • At present, the two facilities communicate only by phone. This prevents them from accessing each other’s database. This problem can be solved by introducing Intranet network.
    • To maintain the national standard in education (and exchange collectibles) the museum should establish links with other environmental museums and organizations across New York State and the US, particularly with the Museum of Natural History in New York City. This can be done by extranet which would establish communication between the museum, local schools, and other organizations in the Hudson Valley region.
  • The MHH Management Problems (2)
    • To organize better the Museum’s collectibles and administrative work a CAFM application is needed. Such application would help the Museum with:
    • Storing and presenting the museum’s specimens of flora and fauna
    • Keeping a record of members, benefactors and volunteers
    • Keeping a record of financial activities and preparing financial budget
    Most of the Museum’s space is an open space of 177 acres and the Museum has only one full-time maintenance employee. Because of that, there is no need for the space management and tracking maintenance work..
  • CAFM Solution for the MHH
    • As the result of my work, I found three vendors whose products were worth investigating. These applications are:
    • CEO Optimum Setting ii - the space planning software
    • ADLIB Information System, Inc. - the integrated museum application
    • PastTime Software Company, Inc . - the museum collection and networking software
  • CEO Optimum Setting ii software
    • The software “ Optimum Setting ii - Simply Smarter Space Management ” is an intuitive and intelligent space management program which allows users to draw floor plans with accurate architectural details incorporated into the program.
    • I found that the software “Optimum Setting ii” has no collectibles or management support. I would recommend this application for independent decorators and consultants who organize business events, or for a small home-office management.
  • ADLIB Information System, Inc.,
    • This European (Netherlands) vendor developed this software especially for museum management, art collection, library cataloguing; it can be used on stand-alone computers and as a multi-user system on LAN or WAN.
    • The standard ADLIB Internet Server is supplied with all the necessary settings and is ready to run after being downloaded.
  • PastPerfect Museum Software 3.0 The software is an integrated relational database in collection management and includes every aspect of collection and membership management. PastPerfect software has the endorsement of the American Association for State and Local History as exemplary software for museums and historical societies.
  • The Future Impact of Information Technology on Facilities Management (1)
    • Office workers at all levels will become more dependent on technology due to breakthroughs in desktop video conferencing, voice recognition, electronic records management, and multimedia presentation technologies.
    • The development of communications technology will stimulate growth of the intranet and extranet, speeding transmission of voice, data and images over the digital network.
    • Networking will be available from non-traditional sources such as cable TV and satellite services.
  • The Future Impact of Information Technology on Facilities Management (2)
    • The Internet will become the backbone of communication, connecting computers worldwide and developing new forms of electronics-business (e-comers).
    • Interactive three-dimensional video, very high-bandwidth communication channels, and virtual reality as a communications medium may be part of future offices which will challenge how we design offices in the future in both categories: individual offices and conference rooms.
  • The Future Impact of Information Technology on Facilities Management (3)
    • Future specialized office computers will be the equivalent of “electronic post-it notes” dedicated to special tasks, and will be able to recognize an employee’s handwriting and voice; workers will be able to record voice messages, dictate correspondence to customers etc. All these computers will communicate with one another via wireless technologies using satellite communication or personal communication networks (PCN), which will enable documents to “fly” from place to place invisibly and fast.
    • Portable laptop computers, video/audio teleconferencing equipment, LCD and video projectors, fax machines, optical scanners, smart electronic information display boards and handwritten input tables are examples of standard automated equipment in future offices. Teleconferencing rooms will be for rent, as commercial space is now.
    • New multimedia communication systems will open the door to Video-Web technologies which will integrate with the companies’ Webs, creating more sophisticated meeting and training rooms.
    The Future Impact of Information Technology on Facilities Management (4)
  • THANK YOU FOR YOUR ATTENTION