Writing 1102
Muis Academy
What We’ll Share Today
• Emails
• Letters
• Proposals
• Reports
• Social Media
The Basics
• Writing is COMMUNICATION
– Step 1 – Have something to say
– Step 2 – Decide to whom you want to say it
– Step...
The Basics
• Writing is COMMUNICATION
– Step 1 – Have something to say
• Think through your message/idea
• What exactly do...
The Basics
• Writing is COMMUNICATION
– Step 5 – Execute
• Don’t forget to proof read
– Step 6 – Check what the reader und...
What We’ll Share Today
• Emails
• Letters
• Proposals
• Reports
• Social Media
Writing a Formal Email
• Use a neutral e-mail address
• bangkai@hotmail.com
• Use a short and accurate subject header
• Us...
Writing the actual message
• Try to break up the message into paragraphs
by topic to make your message more logical
and di...
Ending
• Use the correct form of leave-taking
– Yours sincerely
• Sign with your full name
• PROOFREAD
– Content
– Spellin...
Formal vs Informal Writing
• Different word choices, word usage, and
grammatical structures.
• An informal style may make ...
Formal vs Informal Writing
• BUT do not be stiff and AVOID civil service
speak
– http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/8349709/T...
Simplify!
• "It is characteristic of all committee discussions and decisions that
every member has a vivid recollection of...
Simplify!
• Well, it's clear that the committee has agreed that your new policy
is a really excellent plan but in view of ...
Writing a Letter
• Write your address and telephone number on the
left hand side of the page
• One line beneath that (two ...
Write the body of the letter
• The body of the letter need not be more than three
paragraphs. If you can't say it in less ...
Ending
• Use the correct form of leave-taking
– Yours sincerely
• Sign with your full name
• PROOFREAD
– Content
– Spellin...
What We’ll Share Today
• Emails
• Letters
• Proposals
• Reports
• Social Media
Proposal Paper
• State your purpose.
– Do this clearly and concisely so that the reader knows
immediately why you are writ...
What We’ll Share Today
• Emails
• Letters
• Proposals
• Reports
• Social Media
Writing a Report
• Formal style
• Introduction, Body and Conclusion
• Demonstrate analytical thinking
• Always do careful ...
A Good Report
• presents information, not an argument
• is meant to be scanned quickly by the reader
• uses numbered headi...
When formatting a report
• use plenty of white space
• ensure the separate parts of your report stand out clearly
• use su...
What We’ll Share Today
• Emails
• Letters
• Proposals
• Reports
• Social Media
The Basics
• Writing is COMMUNICATION
– Step 1 – Have something to say
• Think through your message/idea
• What exactly do...
The Basics
• Writing is COMMUNICATION
– Step 5 – Execute
• Don’t forget to proof read
– Step 6 – Check what the reader und...
Ending
• What did we learn today?
asri@muis.gov.sg
aku.gilakucing@facebook.com
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Writing 1102

391 views
272 views

Published on

Published in: Education, Business
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
391
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
8
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Writing 1102

  1. 1. Writing 1102 Muis Academy
  2. 2. What We’ll Share Today • Emails • Letters • Proposals • Reports • Social Media
  3. 3. The Basics • Writing is COMMUNICATION – Step 1 – Have something to say – Step 2 – Decide to whom you want to say it – Step 3 – Decide how you want to say it – Step 4 – Execute – Step 5 – Check what the reader understood
  4. 4. The Basics • Writing is COMMUNICATION – Step 1 – Have something to say • Think through your message/idea • What exactly do you want your reader to understand? – Step 2 – Decide to whom you want to say it • One to one or mass • Who is that reader? What’s your relationship? – Step 3 – Decide how you want to say it • Formal? Informal? Serious? Humour? Anger?
  5. 5. The Basics • Writing is COMMUNICATION – Step 5 – Execute • Don’t forget to proof read – Step 6 – Check what the reader understood • Ask for feedback
  6. 6. What We’ll Share Today • Emails • Letters • Proposals • Reports • Social Media
  7. 7. Writing a Formal Email • Use a neutral e-mail address • bangkai@hotmail.com • Use a short and accurate subject header • Use a proper salutation • Introduce yourself in the first paragraph (if necessary) • Write the actual message – http://www.wikihow.com/Write-a-Formal-Email
  8. 8. Writing the actual message • Try to break up the message into paragraphs by topic to make your message more logical and digestible. • If possible, one idea per paragraph. • No more than 5 paragraphs long and each paragraph should be no more than 5 sentences long. • Avoid informal writing. – http://www.wikihow.com/Write-a-Formal-Email
  9. 9. Ending • Use the correct form of leave-taking – Yours sincerely • Sign with your full name • PROOFREAD – Content – Spelling and grammar – http://www.wikihow.com/Write-a-Formal-Email
  10. 10. Formal vs Informal Writing • Different word choices, word usage, and grammatical structures. • An informal style may make listeners feel more comfortable when you are speaking • A formal writing style can make a good impression • http://www.wikihow.com/Avoid-Colloquial- %28Informal%29-Writing
  11. 11. Formal vs Informal Writing • BUT do not be stiff and AVOID civil service speak – http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/8349709/The- Yes-Minister-guides-for-civil-servants.html – http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/201 3/jul/01/gove-rules-writing-civil-servants
  12. 12. Simplify! • "It is characteristic of all committee discussions and decisions that every member has a vivid recollection of them, and that every member's recollection of them differs violently from every other member's recollection; consequently we accept the convention that the official decisions are those and only those which have been officially recorded in the minutes by the officials; from which it emerges with elegant inevitability, that any decision which has been officially reached would have been officially recorded in the minutes by the officials, and any decisions which is not recorded in the minutes by the officials has not been officially reached, even if one or more members believe they can recollect it; so in this particular case, if the decision would have been officially reached, it would have been recorded in the minutes by the officials and it isn't so it wasn't."
  13. 13. Simplify! • Well, it's clear that the committee has agreed that your new policy is a really excellent plan but in view of some of the doubts being expressed, may I propose that I recall that after careful consideration, the considered view of the committee was that while they considered that the proposal met with broad approval in principle, that some of the principles were sufficiently fundamental in principle and some of the considerations so complex and finely balanced in practice, that, in principle, it was proposed that the sensible and prudent practice would be to submit the proposal for more detailed consideration, laying stress on the essential continuity of the new proposal with existing principles, and the principle of the principle arguments which the proposal proposes and propounds for their approval, in principle.
  14. 14. Writing a Letter • Write your address and telephone number on the left hand side of the page • One line beneath that (two hard returns), place the date directly below the sender's address. • One line beneath that (two hard returns), type the recipient's name, title, and address. • Give the person you're addressing a salutation – http://www.wikihow.com/Write-a-Formal-Letter
  15. 15. Write the body of the letter • The body of the letter need not be more than three paragraphs. If you can't say it in less than three paragraphs, then you're probably not being concise enough. – State the reason or goal of the letter. Cut straight to the chase – Use examples to stress or underline your point, if possible. Concrete, real examples are always better than hypothetical examples. – Briefly summarise your purpose in writing and suggest how you might want to proceed further. – http://www.wikihow.com/Write-a-Formal-Letter
  16. 16. Ending • Use the correct form of leave-taking – Yours sincerely • Sign with your full name • PROOFREAD – Content – Spelling and grammar – http://www.wikihow.com/Write-a-Formal-Letter
  17. 17. What We’ll Share Today • Emails • Letters • Proposals • Reports • Social Media
  18. 18. Proposal Paper • State your purpose. – Do this clearly and concisely so that the reader knows immediately why you are writing. • Give some background information – Help the reader get a better understanding of the problem. • State a solution to the problem – Give specifics about your suggestion. • Any costs involved. • Conclude by restating the problem and proposed solution.
  19. 19. What We’ll Share Today • Emails • Letters • Proposals • Reports • Social Media
  20. 20. Writing a Report • Formal style • Introduction, Body and Conclusion • Demonstrate analytical thinking • Always do careful proof-reading and neat presentation
  21. 21. A Good Report • presents information, not an argument • is meant to be scanned quickly by the reader • uses numbered headings and sub-headings • uses short, concise paragraphs and dot-points where applicable • uses graphics wherever possible (tables, graphs, illustrations) • may need an abstract (sometimes called an executive summary) • does not always need references and bibliography • is often followed by recommendations and/or appendices
  22. 22. When formatting a report • use plenty of white space • ensure the separate parts of your report stand out clearly • use subheadings • allow generous spacing between the elements of your report • use dot points/ numbers/ letters to articulate these elements • use tables and figures (graphs, illustrations, maps etc) for clarification. • number each page • use consistent and appropriate formatting • use formal language
  23. 23. What We’ll Share Today • Emails • Letters • Proposals • Reports • Social Media
  24. 24. The Basics • Writing is COMMUNICATION – Step 1 – Have something to say • Think through your message/idea • What exactly do you want your reader to understand? – Step 2 – Decide to whom you want to say it • One to one or mass • Who is that reader? What’s your relationship? – Step 3 – Decide how you want to say it • Formal? Informal? Serious? Humour? Anger?
  25. 25. The Basics • Writing is COMMUNICATION – Step 5 – Execute • Don’t forget to proof read – Step 6 – Check what the reader understood • Ask for feedback
  26. 26. Ending • What did we learn today? asri@muis.gov.sg aku.gilakucing@facebook.com

×