Welcome to
CoRT Workshop
Expect Great Outcomes
• Have fun
• Learn
– Six Thinking Hats
– Focused Innovation Workshop
• Apply
– Six Thinking Hats app...
Agenda
• Organize into groups
• Introduce Six Thinking Hats
• Apply Six Thinking Hats
• Introduce Focused Innovation
• Sel...
Enable Free Flowing of
Creative Ideas
• Have fun! -
• All are strongly encouraged to participate .
• Stay focused .
• No c...
Killer Phrases Are Not Used During Idea Generation*
1. "Yes, but. . . "
2. "We tried that before."
3. "That's irrelevant."...
EMOTIONS
•EMOTIONS: Are all very well and good, but
need to be expressed in the right place to
be productive
A
Temperatur
e Gauge
I’m enthusiastic!
I like it!
I wish I had more
information.
Sounds interesting.
I feel uncertain.
I d...
•What might this child
be thinking?
•What questions would
you like to ask him?
Welcome to Mars
Creativity exercise
•Imagine you are the first person to step on
Mars
•You walk around a corner and there in front of
you ...
Play with ideas
• Have fun
• Combine seemingly
unconnected ideas
• Humour allows us to take
things less seriously
• Challe...
Activity
Think of as many uses as possible for a plastic bottle.
•Creativity is thinking up new things.
Innovation is doing new things.
---Theodore Levitt
Creativity
•As easy as changing
perspective.
•Who sees the duck?
• Who sees the rabbit?
Creativity
•As easy as changing
perspective.
•Who sees the duck?
• Who sees the rabbit?
Joyce KWOKCCC Kei San Secondary School18
Choices from
Senior Teachers
• What is critical thinking?
• Why is critical thinking important in the course(s)
you teach?
• Why is that important?
• W...
Lateral Thinking
• Alternatives: Use concepts to breed new ideas
• Focus: Sharpen or change your focus to improve your
cre...
Benefits of Lateral Thinking
• Constructively challenge the status quo to enable new ideas
to surface
• Find and build on ...
Your Success Depends on YOU!
• Enhance your competence
– Learn how to model
– Learn test design techniques
– Read, take cl...
What is Visual Thinking?
• An approach to understanding, creating, and
communicating
• A collection of visually-based conc...
Synonyms
• visual thinking
• Vizability
• non-linear thinking
• lateral thinking
• spatial reasoning
• right brain thinking
betterperceivethe
world
betterrepresent
informationtothe
targetaudience
TheVisualThinkingProcess
The ARC Cycle
Act
ReflectChange
"Critical thinking is not just a matter of
applying the rules of logic (much less scientific
method). It is a matter of th...
When some people are asked to
think
they sometimes choose different directions to others around them.
different
direction ThinkingThinking
LooksLooks going or pointing away from a particular
place or towards the outside
ThinkingThinking
Meets in the middleMeets in the middle
Parallel Thinking
• If we think in PARALLEL, our thoughts
naturally become more organised.
• Thinkers focus in the same di...
Parallel ThinkingParallel Thinking
Looks at a situationLooks at a situation
from a lot of different
viewpoints
before maki...
Parallel Thinking
•White Cap:
Information
Available and
Needed
•Red Cap: Intuition
and Feelings
•Black Cap: Cautions,
Crit...
Lateral ThinkingLateral Thinking
Edward De Bono
lus
inus
nteresting
PMI - Example
• Windows should be made of transparent plastic instead
of glass
• P:
– They wouldn’t break as easily
– They...
PMI - Exercise
• All seats should be taken out of buses
• P:
– 3 minutes
• M:
– 3 minutes
• I:
– 3 minutes
PMI - Exercise
• All seats should be taken out of buses
• P:
– More people would be able to get into buses
– It would be e...
A bit of thinking…
Nobody should be paid extra for working after
6pm in the evening.
2 minute discussion
What If? Key
You can ask almost any one What If question.
You can use the ideas wheel to record student
responses.
– Eg. W...
Questionnaire
• Particularly for the non-verbal students in this
study, two key decisions were taken,
– the questions were...
The Vision
Breakthrough
Breakdown
DEVELOPING YOUR BUSINESS
Stages of creative thinking:
1. Move away:
2. Bring back into the world
A few words
About People, Ideas and
Creativity
47
The signs of change!
There are theory that support this
vision and to make you think….
49
Thoughts
•"In the same way as the tree bears the same
fruit year after year, but each time new fruit, all
lastingly valuab...
Critical Thinking Problem
How can we significantly increase the critical
thinking ability of Fayetteville State University...
Teach students to think critically by:
• Using reflection activities in and out of class
• Using the Thinking Hats method
...
Wrap Up Activity:
Using Learning Styles and
Cognitive Science Information
in Our Teaching
• Select a course you are teachi...
A new Model?
CoRT 1 Tools
Before the six hats, de Bono had created a set of
seven thinking tools we now know as CoRT 1
DIRECTIONAL THIN...
The Seven CoRT 1 tools
A.G.O A.P.C C & S
FIP CAF OPV
P.M.I
Yellow Hat → Black Hat → Green Hat
•
P M I
PMI (Plus, Minus, Interesting(
This tool allows us to:EXPLORE
ASSESS
EVALUATE
Elements of a PMI
• Plus
- Good things
- Things you like
- What works
• Minus
- Things you don’t like
- What doesn’t work
...
Trying out a PMI
WHAT IF DOGS COULD TALK?
Practising PMI
1. People should wear badges showing whether they
are in a good mood or bad mood that day.
2. You pick up a...
Aims Goals and Objectives (AGO(
To give you an overview of Edward de Bono’s
thinking tools and test out a few key ideas…
PROCESS
• Sequential ‘scanning’ tool
• Look in ‘P’ direction first (ignore other points) & do same
for ‘M’ & ‘I’
• Black/Y...
PRINCIPLES
• Without a PMI valuable ideas may be rejected because they
seem bad at first
• Without a PMI you are unlikely ...
In conclusion:
“The simplest form of thinking is to react to a situation.
The next stage is to enlarge the way we look at ...
In conclusion:
“ Using Think Before You Act promotes a positive pattern of
motivation in that there is a:
• Belief amongst...
CAF (Consider all factors(
Key points:
• Deliberately looking around for factors
including and beyond the obvious
• Do a C...
Plus Minus Interesting
(PMI, one of the CoRT thinking tools(
• Plus - what things are positive or good?
• Minus - what thi...
The 5 Ws
• Who? – who will be involved, be affected by, come into
contact with, benefit from, not be involved?
• What? – w...
Five Whys
Emphasis on celebration of competitive sport
More fixtures arranged for boys
Historic practice
Only league fixtu...
Long term planning tool: (1(
• Stand back from the issue, be objective
• Look for common ground
• Focus on the positives o...
Long term planning tool: (2(
• Keep phoning back
• Acknowledge the H/T and staff are busy
people
• Have something you can ...
Trying out a CAF
Do a CAF on the
factors involved in
taking on a new,
large, client.
Consider All Factors CAF
• Related to
– Action
– Decision
– Planning
– Judgement
– Conclusion
• Consider
– the factors aff...
CAF - Example
• A husband and wife go to buy a used car from their
family. They consider the following factors;
– The pers...
CAF - Exercise
• What are the factors involved in choosing your
hairstyle ?
– 10 factors
Other Peoples Views OPV
• The process of looking at other people s
viewpoints so that the process can be used
consciously ...
OPV - Example
• A salesperson is trying to sell you a second-
hand sports car
• Salesperson: Show how sharp car is, how po...
OPV - Exercise
• A boy refuses to obey his teacher in class. The
teacher sends the boy to the principal who
suspends him. ...
APC (Alternatives, possibilities,
choices(
• This is a creative tool to encourage
divergent thinking.
• Can require delibe...
Trying an APC
You have handed in an important
piece of work and afterwards
realise you have made a crucial
error in calcul...
So where now? APC…
• Try out some ideas individually when planning
at work
• Try out some suggestions in small group
meeti...
The Core Pattern Of Successful
Change
See
People find a problem in
some stage of the change
process--too many of their
col...
Some Action Steps to Consider
• Examine and Appraise Aspiration Levels
– Performance below aspiration level leads to
energ...
Some Action Steps to Consider
• Perform Political Analysis of Status Quo
– Q. Do a Cui Bono analysis: who benefits?
– Q. W...
Some Action Steps to Consider
• Strengthen Motivation of Key Actors who are
Allied with Change
– Align Incentives with Spe...
Some Action Steps to Consider
• Shoulder Leadership Responsibilities
– Think through Overall Communication Strategy
– Acti...
TAKE CARE . . .TAKE CARE . . .
Minutes
. . . WHEN YOUR MIND’s ELSEWHER. . . WHEN YOUR MIND’s ELSEWHER
Another exercise
• On the following slide are a bunch of words
• Please have a look at them and try to fine the
link betwe...
Thinklaterally,outofthebox,creatively
Soap
Tax
CamelPicture
Farm
Cloud
Saw
Church
Random words
• Of course in this case there is NO defined link
• Your own ideas demonstrate how creative you
can be
• So i...
Innovation & Creativity
“Creativity is thinking up
new things …
Innovation is doing new
things”
- 3M
Creative Thinking
“Creative thinking is not a talent, it
is a skill that can be learnt. It
empowers people by adding stren...
Another view of Innovation
Idea
Timeliness “Value”
The Collaboration
MHS UWS
TheWorld
Weak networks
The Innovative Collaboration
MHS UWS
TheWorld
Strong networks
Cort program for creative thinking
Cort program for creative thinking
Cort program for creative thinking
Cort program for creative thinking
Cort program for creative thinking
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  • What we know
    Over recent years considerable commentary has been made * regarding the observed daily life circumstances of many people with disabilities. NICAN in the development of its National Recreation Policy (October 1999) identified a number of specific characteristics that reflected the daily life circumstances experienced by many people with a disability. (It should be noted that these same characteristics are also experienced by many other individuals, or groups of individuals who may have been placed in a similar marginalised position).
  • 1. Each group does a full PMI for 3-5 minutes. The objective is to try and guess the two plus points, the two minus points and the two interesting points identified by the teacher. Each group can offer ONE suggestion at a time for either P, M or I points, when a group guesses one of the target points, this is indicated. When no more are forthcoming the remaining points are provided.
    2. Each group does a full PMI for 3-5 minutes. ONE group is designated to give its PLUS points and other groups/individuals can add further points. Another group gives MINUS points and finally a further group gives its INTERESTING points.
    3. Individual groups do either P, M or I points as instructed for 3 minutes - feedback as in 2 above.
  • 2:15 (30 mins in total) JH
    Mention that there are many other problem solving tools and techniques available and anyone who has been involved in workforce remodelling may be familiar with some of them. We are available to offer help and suggestions at a later date as required
  • People naturally assume that they have considered all the factors, but usually their consideration is limited to the obvious ones. Turning CAF into a deliberate operation switches attention from the importance of the factors to looking around for all the factors. Clearly it is difficult to consider all the factors, so in the teaching situation consideration can be limited to the ten most important factors (or any other number), or the lesson can be taught in terms of:
    The emphasis of the lesson is on the factors that have been left out in a decision, plan, etc. In doing a CAF, students try to ensure that all important factors are listed in looking at each other's thinking, students try to spot which factors have been neglected. The CAF may be applied to one's own thinking as well as to the thinking of others: "What factors have I left out here?"
  • People naturally assume that they have considered all the factors, but usually their consideration is limited to the obvious ones. Turning CAF into a deliberate operation switches attention from the importance of the factors to looking around for all the factors. Clearly it is difficult to consider all the factors, so in the teaching situation consideration can be limited to the ten most important factors (or any other number), or the lesson can be taught in terms of:
    The emphasis of the lesson is on the factors that have been left out in a decision, plan, etc. In doing a CAF, students try to ensure that all important factors are listed in looking at each other's thinking, students try to spot which factors have been neglected. The CAF may be applied to one's own thinking as well as to the thinking of others: "What factors have I left out here?"
  • People naturally assume that they have considered all the factors, but usually their consideration is limited to the obvious ones. Turning CAF into a deliberate operation switches attention from the importance of the factors to looking around for all the factors. Clearly it is difficult to consider all the factors, so in the teaching situation consideration can be limited to the ten most important factors (or any other number), or the lesson can be taught in terms of:
    The emphasis of the lesson is on the factors that have been left out in a decision, plan, etc. In doing a CAF, students try to ensure that all important factors are listed in looking at each other's thinking, students try to spot which factors have been neglected. The CAF may be applied to one's own thinking as well as to the thinking of others: "What factors have I left out here?"
  • In the preceding nine lessons the enlargement of the situation - the broadening of perception - has always been from the point of view of the thinker. But many thinking situations involve other people as well. The point of view of these other people is also an essential part of the enlargement of the situation which is the basic theme of these first ten lessons. Thus another person may have different objectives, different priorities, different alternatives, etc. In fact, when another person does a PMI, CAF, C&S, AGO, FIP, or APC he or she may come up with different ideas because he or she is in a different position.
  • In the preceding nine lessons the enlargement of the situation - the broadening of perception - has always been from the point of view of the thinker. But many thinking situations involve other people as well. The point of view of these other people is also an essential part of the enlargement of the situation which is the basic theme of these first ten lessons. Thus another person may have different objectives, different priorities, different alternatives, etc. In fact, when another person does a PMI, CAF, C&S, AGO, FIP, or APC he or she may come up with different ideas because he or she is in a different position.
  • In the preceding nine lessons the enlargement of the situation - the broadening of perception - has always been from the point of view of the thinker. But many thinking situations involve other people as well. The point of view of these other people is also an essential part of the enlargement of the situation which is the basic theme of these first ten lessons. Thus another person may have different objectives, different priorities, different alternatives, etc. In fact, when another person does a PMI, CAF, C&S, AGO, FIP, or APC he or she may come up with different ideas because he or she is in a different position.
  • Cort program for creative thinking

    1. 1. Welcome to CoRT Workshop
    2. 2. Expect Great Outcomes • Have fun • Learn – Six Thinking Hats – Focused Innovation Workshop • Apply – Six Thinking Hats approach to improve the quality and productivity of your future meetings – Focused Innovation to generate innovative improvement ideas for a specific learning styles and other areas in the future
    3. 3. Agenda • Organize into groups • Introduce Six Thinking Hats • Apply Six Thinking Hats • Introduce Focused Innovation • Select and apply some examples • Apply process • Share results
    4. 4. Enable Free Flowing of Creative Ideas • Have fun! - • All are strongly encouraged to participate . • Stay focused . • No criticism or use of “killer phrases” * during idea generation • Build on each other’s ideas • Wild ideas are encouraged
    5. 5. Killer Phrases Are Not Used During Idea Generation* 1. "Yes, but. . . " 2. "We tried that before." 3. "That's irrelevant." 4. "We haven't got the manpower." 5. "Obviously, you misread my request." 6. "Don't rock the boat!" 7. "The boss (or competition) will eat you alive." 8. "Don't waste time thinking." 9. "Great idea, but not for us." 10. "It'll never fly." 11. "Don't be ridiculous." 12. "People don't want change." 13. "It's not in the budget." 14. "Put it in writing." 15. "It will be more trouble than it's worth." 16. "It isn't your responsibility." 17. "That's not in your job description." 18. "You can't teach an old dog new tricks." 19. "Let's stick with what works."C 20. "We've done all right so far." 21. "The boss will never go for it." 22. "It's too far ahead of the times." 23. . . . laughter. . . 24. . . . suppressed laughter. . . 25. . . . condescending grin. . . 26. . . . dirty looks. . . 27. "Don't fight city hall!" 28. "I'm the one who gets paid to think." 29. "What will people say?" 30. "Get a committee to look into that." 31. "If it ain't broke, don't fix it." 32. "You have got to be kidding." 33. "No!" 34. "We've always done it this way." 35. "It's all right in theory. . . but. . ." 36. "Be practical!" 37. "Do you realize the paperwork it will create?" 38. "Because I said so." 39. "I'll get back to you." 40. . . . silence. . .
    6. 6. EMOTIONS •EMOTIONS: Are all very well and good, but need to be expressed in the right place to be productive
    7. 7. A Temperatur e Gauge I’m enthusiastic! I like it! I wish I had more information. Sounds interesting. I feel uncertain. I dislike it. Hate it!
    8. 8. •What might this child be thinking? •What questions would you like to ask him?
    9. 9. Welcome to Mars
    10. 10. Creativity exercise •Imagine you are the first person to step on Mars •You walk around a corner and there in front of you is a planet •Close your eyes and picture the planet in every detail •In fact draw your planet
    11. 11. Play with ideas • Have fun • Combine seemingly unconnected ideas • Humour allows us to take things less seriously • Challenge the rules and come up with alternatives “In my experience, the best creative work is never done when one is unhappy.” Albert Einstein
    12. 12. Activity Think of as many uses as possible for a plastic bottle.
    13. 13. •Creativity is thinking up new things. Innovation is doing new things. ---Theodore Levitt
    14. 14. Creativity •As easy as changing perspective. •Who sees the duck? • Who sees the rabbit?
    15. 15. Creativity •As easy as changing perspective. •Who sees the duck? • Who sees the rabbit?
    16. 16. Joyce KWOKCCC Kei San Secondary School18 Choices from Senior Teachers
    17. 17. • What is critical thinking? • Why is critical thinking important in the course(s) you teach? • Why is that important? • Why is that important?
    18. 18. Lateral Thinking • Alternatives: Use concepts to breed new ideas • Focus: Sharpen or change your focus to improve your creative efforts • Challenge: Break free from the limits of accepted ways of operating • Random Entry: Use unconnected input to open new lines of thinking • Provocation: Move from a provocative statement to useful ideas • Harvesting: Select the best of early ideas and shape them into useable approaches • Treatment of Ideas: How to develop ideas and shape them to fit an organization or situation Edward de Bono
    19. 19. Benefits of Lateral Thinking • Constructively challenge the status quo to enable new ideas to surface • Find and build on the concept behind an idea to create more ideas • Solve problems in ways that don’t initially come to mind • Use alternatives to liberate and harness your creative energy • Turn problems into opportunities • Select the best alternate ideas and implement them
    20. 20. Your Success Depends on YOU! • Enhance your competence – Learn how to model – Learn test design techniques – Read, take classes, be creative – Be flexible – adapt to the situation • Testing is advanced stuff – you need skill to succeed • Change yourself – not others
    21. 21. What is Visual Thinking? • An approach to understanding, creating, and communicating • A collection of visually-based concepts and methods – Information Visualization guidelines – Mindmaps – Sequential visual representations • What we can learn from Film and Comics – Vizability – cd/book on visual skills
    22. 22. Synonyms • visual thinking • Vizability • non-linear thinking • lateral thinking • spatial reasoning • right brain thinking
    23. 23. betterperceivethe world betterrepresent informationtothe targetaudience TheVisualThinkingProcess
    24. 24. The ARC Cycle Act ReflectChange
    25. 25. "Critical thinking is not just a matter of applying the rules of logic (much less scientific method). It is a matter of thinking and feeling with others, to a wealth of facts about the possible effects of alternative actions, of meaning in experience, of looking at the world from different perspectives." --Warren Nord
    26. 26. When some people are asked to think they sometimes choose different directions to others around them.
    27. 27. different direction ThinkingThinking LooksLooks going or pointing away from a particular place or towards the outside
    28. 28. ThinkingThinking Meets in the middleMeets in the middle
    29. 29. Parallel Thinking • If we think in PARALLEL, our thoughts naturally become more organised. • Thinkers focus in the same direction as one another, wearing the same ‘hat’ at a given time • Imagine you are with three people looking at a building; would you each try to describe one side?
    30. 30. Parallel ThinkingParallel Thinking Looks at a situationLooks at a situation from a lot of different viewpoints before making abefore making a decisiondecision
    31. 31. Parallel Thinking •White Cap: Information Available and Needed •Red Cap: Intuition and Feelings •Black Cap: Cautions, Critical Thinking •Yellow Cap: Benefits •Green Cap: Alternatives and Creative Ideas •Blue Cap: Managing Thinking, Thinking about Thinking Modified from Ed De Bono’s Six Thinking Hats
    32. 32. Lateral ThinkingLateral Thinking Edward De Bono
    33. 33. lus inus nteresting
    34. 34. PMI - Example • Windows should be made of transparent plastic instead of glass • P: – They wouldn’t break as easily – They would not be as dangerous when broken • M: – Plastic would be more expensive than glass – Plastic would get scratched very easily • I: – Perhaps windows could be of all colours if plastic – Perhaps we take it for granted that glass is best since we are used to it
    35. 35. PMI - Exercise • All seats should be taken out of buses • P: – 3 minutes • M: – 3 minutes • I: – 3 minutes
    36. 36. PMI - Exercise • All seats should be taken out of buses • P: – More people would be able to get into buses – It would be easier to get in and out – Buses would be cheaper to make and to repair • M: – Passengers would fall over if sudden stops – Old people and the disabled might not be able to use buses – It would be harder to carry shopping bags and babies • I: – Might be two types of bus; one with seats, one without – The same bus might do more work – Comfort is less important on a bus ??
    37. 37. A bit of thinking… Nobody should be paid extra for working after 6pm in the evening. 2 minute discussion
    38. 38. What If? Key You can ask almost any one What If question. You can use the ideas wheel to record student responses. – Eg. What If: »all cars turned into skateboards? »chocolate was good for you? »mice were as big as elephants? »money did grow on trees?
    39. 39. Questionnaire • Particularly for the non-verbal students in this study, two key decisions were taken, – the questions were kept relatively straightforward – the number of questions was kept to a minimum.
    40. 40. The Vision Breakthrough Breakdown
    41. 41. DEVELOPING YOUR BUSINESS Stages of creative thinking: 1. Move away: 2. Bring back into the world
    42. 42. A few words About People, Ideas and Creativity 47
    43. 43. The signs of change!
    44. 44. There are theory that support this vision and to make you think…. 49
    45. 45. Thoughts •"In the same way as the tree bears the same fruit year after year, but each time new fruit, all lastingly valuable ideas in thinking must always be reborn.")Albert Schweitzer( •"Just because everything is different doesn't mean anything has changed.")Irene Peter(
    46. 46. Critical Thinking Problem How can we significantly increase the critical thinking ability of Fayetteville State University students?
    47. 47. Teach students to think critically by: • Using reflection activities in and out of class • Using the Thinking Hats method • Converting the course to a Communication across the Curriculum course • Making the course a Service-Learning course • Making all examinations cumulative • Others?
    48. 48. Wrap Up Activity: Using Learning Styles and Cognitive Science Information in Our Teaching • Select a course you are teaching (or have taught, or may teach in the future) • Describe how you can incorporate (or have incorporated) strategies to improve critical thinking into the course • Describe one strategy you can use to teach students how to learn the course material
    49. 49. A new Model?
    50. 50. CoRT 1 Tools Before the six hats, de Bono had created a set of seven thinking tools we now know as CoRT 1 DIRECTIONAL THINKING TOOLS Like the hats they can be used independently of one another or in sequences
    51. 51. The Seven CoRT 1 tools A.G.O A.P.C C & S FIP CAF OPV P.M.I
    52. 52. Yellow Hat → Black Hat → Green Hat • P M I
    53. 53. PMI (Plus, Minus, Interesting( This tool allows us to:EXPLORE ASSESS EVALUATE
    54. 54. Elements of a PMI • Plus - Good things - Things you like - What works • Minus - Things you don’t like - What doesn’t work - Difficulties with the issue • Interesting - Possible consequences or outcomes - Fresh thoughts
    55. 55. Trying out a PMI WHAT IF DOGS COULD TALK?
    56. 56. Practising PMI 1. People should wear badges showing whether they are in a good mood or bad mood that day. 2. You pick up a free white bicycle that belongs to everyone and use it and then leave it for someone else to use. 3. Pupils should vote on their teachers every year at school and give teachers a rating. 61
    57. 57. Aims Goals and Objectives (AGO( To give you an overview of Edward de Bono’s thinking tools and test out a few key ideas…
    58. 58. PROCESS • Sequential ‘scanning’ tool • Look in ‘P’ direction first (ignore other points) & do same for ‘M’ & ‘I’ • Black/Yellow hat thinking cannot be used as minus points • PMI doesn’t have to be logical & can include feelings so Red/Green hats can be used instead 63
    59. 59. PRINCIPLES • Without a PMI valuable ideas may be rejected because they seem bad at first • Without a PMI you are unlikely to see the disadvantages of ideas you like • Without a PMI most judgements are based on your emotions at the time and not on the value of the idea • WITH a PMI you decide whether or not you like the idea after you have explored it NOT before
    60. 60. In conclusion: “The simplest form of thinking is to react to a situation. The next stage is to enlarge the way we look at that situation or to broaden our perception of that situation. Think Before You Act highlights two ways of broadening perception: • To know more about the situation and add more detail, and • To try and find different ways of looking at the same situation instead of assuming there’s only one right way.” 65
    61. 61. In conclusion: “ Using Think Before You Act promotes a positive pattern of motivation in that there is a: • Belief amongst children and young people that effort leads to success; • Belief in children and young people’s own ability to improve and learn • Satisfaction gained from personal success at difficult tasks” 66
    62. 62. CAF (Consider all factors( Key points: • Deliberately looking around for factors including and beyond the obvious • Do a CAF before choosing, deciding or planning • Can assess factors affecting oneself, other people and society in general
    63. 63. Plus Minus Interesting (PMI, one of the CoRT thinking tools( • Plus - what things are positive or good? • Minus - what things are not positive or are bad? • Interesting - what things are interesting and could be developed further? • There are a range of CoRT thinking tools: • PMI – Plus Minus Interesting • FIP – First Important Priority • CAF – Consider All Factors • C&S – Consequences and Sequel • AGO – Aims Goals Objectives • APC - Alternatives Possibilities and Choices • OPV – Other Peoples Views
    64. 64. The 5 Ws • Who? – who will be involved, be affected by, come into contact with, benefit from, not be involved? • What? – what is it for, what does it do, what else could be done, what could be changed? • Why? – why is the issue important, why does it have to be addressed in this way? • Where? – where might it be addressed, where else might it be addressed, where else does it exist? • When? – when might it take place, when might it also take place? • (How? – may also be used as, “in what way?”)
    65. 65. Five Whys Emphasis on celebration of competitive sport More fixtures arranged for boys Historic practice Only league fixture publicised Parents don’t pass information on New opportunities only advertised to existing uses List only updated annually Parents lose information Info only sent our once a year All sport seen as competitive More publicity of boys achievements than girls Info sent to parents rather than pupils Don’t understand hygiene issues Clashes with other activities Gets in the way of socialising Poor kit design – not appealing Too few girls engage in physical activities Doesn’t fit self image Don’t like what’s on offer Perceived as ‘boys sports’ They don’t know all that is available Friends don’t engage Embarrassed about wearing sports kit
    66. 66. Long term planning tool: (1( • Stand back from the issue, be objective • Look for common ground • Focus on the positives of successful partnerships not the negatives of unsuccessful partnerships • Ensure communication is positive and supportive
    67. 67. Long term planning tool: (2( • Keep phoning back • Acknowledge the H/T and staff are busy people • Have something you can offer that won’t cost them any time or money and can be implemented quickly • Follow up and implement quickly
    68. 68. Trying out a CAF Do a CAF on the factors involved in taking on a new, large, client.
    69. 69. Consider All Factors CAF • Related to – Action – Decision – Planning – Judgement – Conclusion • Consider – the factors affecting oneself – the factors affecting other people – the factors affecting society in general.
    70. 70. CAF - Example • A husband and wife go to buy a used car from their family. They consider the following factors; – The person selling it actually owns it – The price of the car – The type of car and colour – The engine power and speed of the car – All the mechanical parts are working well – The car is big enough for a family
    71. 71. CAF - Exercise • What are the factors involved in choosing your hairstyle ? – 10 factors
    72. 72. Other Peoples Views OPV • The process of looking at other people s viewpoints so that the process can be used consciously and deliberately • Consider the views of all stakeholders • Can be employed in conjunction with other techniques
    73. 73. OPV - Example • A salesperson is trying to sell you a second- hand sports car • Salesperson: Show how sharp car is, how powerful the engine, the new tires, how it suits you, what a good buy it was. • You: see whether or not it has been in a crash, how much spare tires cost, how worn the parts are, how it compares with other cars you have seen
    74. 74. OPV - Exercise • A boy refuses to obey his teacher in class. The teacher sends the boy to the principal who suspends him. The boys parents objects. • What is the view of; – The boy – The teacher – The principal – The parents – The classmates
    75. 75. APC (Alternatives, possibilities, choices( • This is a creative tool to encourage divergent thinking. • Can require deliberate effort if you feel satisfied with your thinking • Reminds you there are always choices
    76. 76. Trying an APC You have handed in an important piece of work and afterwards realise you have made a crucial error in calculation. Do an APC to consider your alternatives.
    77. 77. So where now? APC… • Try out some ideas individually when planning at work • Try out some suggestions in small group meetings • Ignore everything that’s been said and go to the pub • Look at some useful websites…
    78. 78. The Core Pattern Of Successful Change See People find a problem in some stage of the change process--too many of their colleagues are behaving complacently, no one is developing a sensible strategy, too many are letting up before the strategy has been achieved. They then create dramatic, eye- catching, compelling situations that help others visualize the problem or the solution to the problem. Feel The visualizations awaken feelings that facilitate useful changes or ease feelings that are getting in the way. Urgency, optimism, or faith may go up. Anger, complacency, cynicism, or fear may go down Change The new feelings change or reinforce new behavior, sometimes very different behavior. People act much less complacently. They try much harder to make a good vision a reality. They don’t stop before the work is done, even if the road seems long.
    79. 79. Some Action Steps to Consider • Examine and Appraise Aspiration Levels – Performance below aspiration level leads to energized efforts – Action: Reset Aspiration Levels through Role Modeling; Important Leadership Task – Action: Assess Current Standing Realistically by Benchmarking Against Challenging Standards
    80. 80. Some Action Steps to Consider • Perform Political Analysis of Status Quo – Q. Do a Cui Bono analysis: who benefits? – Q. Who are the key Stakeholders for a Change? – Q. For a Specific Change, what forces from Stakeholders are for or against change? – Action: Strengthen the Forces for Change and Weaken the Forces against Change – Action: Motivate the Change with a Vision for the Future
    81. 81. Some Action Steps to Consider • Strengthen Motivation of Key Actors who are Allied with Change – Align Incentives with Specific Goals: the Power of Recognition and Rewards – Action: Specify Goals and Create Contingent Rewards (can be non financial) – Strengthen Efficacy and Outcome Expectations – Actions: Train/Retrain People; Invest in Human Capital; Remove Obstacles
    82. 82. Some Action Steps to Consider • Shoulder Leadership Responsibilities – Think through Overall Communication Strategy – Action: Create Specific Simple Programs that Embody Overall goals and Execute Consistently – Action: Role Model Desired Behaviors since Complex Behavior Learnt by Observation – Action: Choose Symbols and Patterns that Capture Spirit of Change; Your Presence Matters
    83. 83. TAKE CARE . . .TAKE CARE . . . Minutes . . . WHEN YOUR MIND’s ELSEWHER. . . WHEN YOUR MIND’s ELSEWHER
    84. 84. Another exercise • On the following slide are a bunch of words • Please have a look at them and try to fine the link between them • Be as creative as possible
    85. 85. Thinklaterally,outofthebox,creatively Soap Tax CamelPicture Farm Cloud Saw Church
    86. 86. Random words • Of course in this case there is NO defined link • Your own ideas demonstrate how creative you can be • So it is possible to break down the patterns in your brain
    87. 87. Innovation & Creativity “Creativity is thinking up new things … Innovation is doing new things” - 3M
    88. 88. Creative Thinking “Creative thinking is not a talent, it is a skill that can be learnt. It empowers people by adding strength to their natural abilities which improves teamwork, productivity and where appropriate profits.” - Edward de Bono
    89. 89. Another view of Innovation Idea Timeliness “Value”
    90. 90. The Collaboration MHS UWS TheWorld Weak networks
    91. 91. The Innovative Collaboration MHS UWS TheWorld Strong networks

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