Dental amalgam

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Dental amalgam

  1. 1. H ighc o p p er a l l oy s w r e e f r i s t dev eo l pe dint hee a rly1 96 0 s b ’ yD . B .K In nes Cl i ck to a dd not e s a a th n d dW v er ana e t a .V Y u ci g t . eo o n o s s d f hg i h e i o l w s ( h c - o n i JC p p nt a e na dD n r a l l hs s i i l o y d e s i e. t A s s th s o c 1 e r e i i l 9 m 63 2 in ; a i t 9 5 o : 8 no 7 f -5 th 93 . ) e g am Thep i m - r n a 2p c p h i a s al e by 1 1 Some amalgam opponents have referred to dental amalgam as a “solid High copper alloys were first developed in the early 1960’s by D.B.K Innes emulsion,” with the implication that the mercury is somehow soaked into the and W.V. Youdelis (J Canad Dent Assoc 1963;29:587-593). The principal particles of silver-tin alloy powder without reaction or the formation of advantage of high-copper alloys is their elimination of the gamma-2 phase by 1 mercury intermetallic compounds. The quote from Dr. Laurier L. Schramm, 2 the reactions shown in this slide. University of Calgary, is a personal communication to Dr. J. R. Mackert on February 19, 2003. C o lk icta d d e no ts C o l ic ktan d d e ots 1 2 e Sm l om i u s o e an”w m l, a g i atm t hoh pei p om l npt en s h o icaa tivnt e rh et e ea f t rr h e m dut dtor e c e n ai ry l as sm l o a g h m em a oa s w s a“ o ak s o i el did t no t he Cl i ck to a dd not e s pa t r m r U i Fe nv i e c b u r c e l e s a r r s o u yi r it y1 yo f s 9 f il n e m t t r , 2 ver C l - i a g 003 t e a l l na l i a y . r l c co , i o yp m o p s a p o e u r w e n s d d o s n r w . a T l c i h o th m ou e qu t m nc u re o ef t i ac i r t o a i t o m o no nt r oD t D. L r he f r a . o m t J. r u i r er a i L R M c . . o S a no c k f h a r e t r m o m n , 2 Cl i ck to a dd not e s R s B B n a e j m ui l nD 41 l 198 J. ;T : 94 he 4f 4 e3 f - c 0f g e 5t o . ases andvapou s o r nm r e cu ye r vapo ai r t on. M t a er 3 2 3 The 3.7-m liquid mirror telescope (LMT) at Université Laval. The reflecting Benjamin DJ. The effect of gases and vapours on mercury evaporation. Mater surface is liquid mercury. Visit http://wood.phy.ulaval.ca/ for more Res Bull 1984;19:443-450. 3 4 information about liquid mirror telescopes. C o lk icta d d e no ts C o l ic ktan d d e ots 3 4 m T r hr i i s gt or e e s r alph c s h o o p w t e a h s t thm n u e eeU se av i e dm r r rs i é Lua . a t e cv ar y vA l pt f r l o eeh r t e s i ve m t c l n r eh ea r ay u y l ri aroe u r da l n ssi i p u d u i q n s h Tr ue 37 s l fa . cei-m qi li udm i q udm c ii er u y rror r t .eV lesis c t o i p t ht e (pM L / :/ w ot U T o a . ) d phi uai n . e s yvl r véL / a . t l ca avo f l a r. m r To ee he r fleci t ng ou t tof o m r ap a a r b ool idr elf e cit ngs u fr ace , th ef o m r ait o n o f am e c r u y r Cl i ck to a dd not e s in o m t f r a iona b o ut liq udm i irror te e l sco pes. 4 Cl i ck to a dd not e s o m D xd é ht t i e c p p/ r ef a t : r /w i m l u yv r e o m o o a e nt p n d p . t h h o i d e s r za i ep yu a . l u f t o h v r n y a . sq a. i l c G c eo u a r e / a f , p U th hc n em iv o e c u t r e s r r e it s u yl éL r y o a f v a y Em a, r l e r d a a Q é n u r n b m ai o F ec t c . , B C a l yr l or a r na a d e , a du . ces the 5 4 5 This graph shows the measured mercury vapor levels in the air around a liquid mirror telescope at the Université Laval. After the mercury layer is spun Baseline vaporization rate is based upon a per-surface weighted average of out to form a paraboloid reflecting surface, the formation of a mercury 0.278 ng·min–1 for six studies cited in Mackert and Berglund, Crit Rev Oral oxide film on the surface of the mercury layer dramatically reduces the Biol Med 1997;8:410-436. Data on 24-h vaporization rate and average area of 5 6 mercury vaporization. Graph courtesy of Ermanno F. Borra, amalgam surface (0.171 cm²) is from Berglund A. J Dent Res Département de physique, Université Laval, Québec, Canada. 1990;69:1646-1651. http://wood.phy.ulaval.ca/ 1High copper alloys were first developed in the early 1960’s by D.B.K Innesand W.V. Youdelis (J Canad Dent Assoc 1963;29:587-593). The principaladvantage of high-copper alloys is their elimination of the gamma-2 phase bythe reactions shown in this slide.

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