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Tesla Event at UCL: Dr Brigitta Zics - How to think about Art and Design in the Age of Consciousness Research
Tesla Event at UCL: Dr Brigitta Zics - How to think about Art and Design in the Age of Consciousness Research
Tesla Event at UCL: Dr Brigitta Zics - How to think about Art and Design in the Age of Consciousness Research
Tesla Event at UCL: Dr Brigitta Zics - How to think about Art and Design in the Age of Consciousness Research
Tesla Event at UCL: Dr Brigitta Zics - How to think about Art and Design in the Age of Consciousness Research
Tesla Event at UCL: Dr Brigitta Zics - How to think about Art and Design in the Age of Consciousness Research
Tesla Event at UCL: Dr Brigitta Zics - How to think about Art and Design in the Age of Consciousness Research
Tesla Event at UCL: Dr Brigitta Zics - How to think about Art and Design in the Age of Consciousness Research
Tesla Event at UCL: Dr Brigitta Zics - How to think about Art and Design in the Age of Consciousness Research
Tesla Event at UCL: Dr Brigitta Zics - How to think about Art and Design in the Age of Consciousness Research
Tesla Event at UCL: Dr Brigitta Zics - How to think about Art and Design in the Age of Consciousness Research
Tesla Event at UCL: Dr Brigitta Zics - How to think about Art and Design in the Age of Consciousness Research
Tesla Event at UCL: Dr Brigitta Zics - How to think about Art and Design in the Age of Consciousness Research
Tesla Event at UCL: Dr Brigitta Zics - How to think about Art and Design in the Age of Consciousness Research
Tesla Event at UCL: Dr Brigitta Zics - How to think about Art and Design in the Age of Consciousness Research
Tesla Event at UCL: Dr Brigitta Zics - How to think about Art and Design in the Age of Consciousness Research
Tesla Event at UCL: Dr Brigitta Zics - How to think about Art and Design in the Age of Consciousness Research
Tesla Event at UCL: Dr Brigitta Zics - How to think about Art and Design in the Age of Consciousness Research
Tesla Event at UCL: Dr Brigitta Zics - How to think about Art and Design in the Age of Consciousness Research
Tesla Event at UCL: Dr Brigitta Zics - How to think about Art and Design in the Age of Consciousness Research
Tesla Event at UCL: Dr Brigitta Zics - How to think about Art and Design in the Age of Consciousness Research
Tesla Event at UCL: Dr Brigitta Zics - How to think about Art and Design in the Age of Consciousness Research
Tesla Event at UCL: Dr Brigitta Zics - How to think about Art and Design in the Age of Consciousness Research
Tesla Event at UCL: Dr Brigitta Zics - How to think about Art and Design in the Age of Consciousness Research
Tesla Event at UCL: Dr Brigitta Zics - How to think about Art and Design in the Age of Consciousness Research
Tesla Event at UCL: Dr Brigitta Zics - How to think about Art and Design in the Age of Consciousness Research
Tesla Event at UCL: Dr Brigitta Zics - How to think about Art and Design in the Age of Consciousness Research
Tesla Event at UCL: Dr Brigitta Zics - How to think about Art and Design in the Age of Consciousness Research
Tesla Event at UCL: Dr Brigitta Zics - How to think about Art and Design in the Age of Consciousness Research
Tesla Event at UCL: Dr Brigitta Zics - How to think about Art and Design in the Age of Consciousness Research
Tesla Event at UCL: Dr Brigitta Zics - How to think about Art and Design in the Age of Consciousness Research
Tesla Event at UCL: Dr Brigitta Zics - How to think about Art and Design in the Age of Consciousness Research
Tesla Event at UCL: Dr Brigitta Zics - How to think about Art and Design in the Age of Consciousness Research
Tesla Event at UCL: Dr Brigitta Zics - How to think about Art and Design in the Age of Consciousness Research
Tesla Event at UCL: Dr Brigitta Zics - How to think about Art and Design in the Age of Consciousness Research
Tesla Event at UCL: Dr Brigitta Zics - How to think about Art and Design in the Age of Consciousness Research
Tesla Event at UCL: Dr Brigitta Zics - How to think about Art and Design in the Age of Consciousness Research
Tesla Event at UCL: Dr Brigitta Zics - How to think about Art and Design in the Age of Consciousness Research
Tesla Event at UCL: Dr Brigitta Zics - How to think about Art and Design in the Age of Consciousness Research
Tesla Event at UCL: Dr Brigitta Zics - How to think about Art and Design in the Age of Consciousness Research
Tesla Event at UCL: Dr Brigitta Zics - How to think about Art and Design in the Age of Consciousness Research
Tesla Event at UCL: Dr Brigitta Zics - How to think about Art and Design in the Age of Consciousness Research
Tesla Event at UCL: Dr Brigitta Zics - How to think about Art and Design in the Age of Consciousness Research
Tesla Event at UCL: Dr Brigitta Zics - How to think about Art and Design in the Age of Consciousness Research
Tesla Event at UCL: Dr Brigitta Zics - How to think about Art and Design in the Age of Consciousness Research
Tesla Event at UCL: Dr Brigitta Zics - How to think about Art and Design in the Age of Consciousness Research
Tesla Event at UCL: Dr Brigitta Zics - How to think about Art and Design in the Age of Consciousness Research
Tesla Event at UCL: Dr Brigitta Zics - How to think about Art and Design in the Age of Consciousness Research
Tesla Event at UCL: Dr Brigitta Zics - How to think about Art and Design in the Age of Consciousness Research
Tesla Event at UCL: Dr Brigitta Zics - How to think about Art and Design in the Age of Consciousness Research
Tesla Event at UCL: Dr Brigitta Zics - How to think about Art and Design in the Age of Consciousness Research
Tesla Event at UCL: Dr Brigitta Zics - How to think about Art and Design in the Age of Consciousness Research
Tesla Event at UCL: Dr Brigitta Zics - How to think about Art and Design in the Age of Consciousness Research
Tesla Event at UCL: Dr Brigitta Zics - How to think about Art and Design in the Age of Consciousness Research
Tesla Event at UCL: Dr Brigitta Zics - How to think about Art and Design in the Age of Consciousness Research
Tesla Event at UCL: Dr Brigitta Zics - How to think about Art and Design in the Age of Consciousness Research
Tesla Event at UCL: Dr Brigitta Zics - How to think about Art and Design in the Age of Consciousness Research
Tesla Event at UCL: Dr Brigitta Zics - How to think about Art and Design in the Age of Consciousness Research
Tesla Event at UCL: Dr Brigitta Zics - How to think about Art and Design in the Age of Consciousness Research
Tesla Event at UCL: Dr Brigitta Zics - How to think about Art and Design in the Age of Consciousness Research
Tesla Event at UCL: Dr Brigitta Zics - How to think about Art and Design in the Age of Consciousness Research
Tesla Event at UCL: Dr Brigitta Zics - How to think about Art and Design in the Age of Consciousness Research
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Tesla Event at UCL: Dr Brigitta Zics - How to think about Art and Design in the Age of Consciousness Research

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Tesla Event at UCL: Dr Brigitta Zics - How to think about Art and Design in the Age of Consciousness Research …

Tesla Event at UCL: Dr Brigitta Zics - How to think about Art and Design in the Age of Consciousness Research

UCL Contact: Gordana Novakovic (Visitors from outside UCL please email in advance).

Thursday, 29 April, 18:00 – 19:00

University College London

Gower Street, London, WC1E 6BT

Garwood Lecture Theatre, South Wing



Abstract

This presentation provides an overview of the critical thinking in some creative practices through the study of consciousness. It argues that technology has brought such qualities and capacities to aesthetical production and meaning creation which might only be extractable through the understanding of the human factor in these experiences. The presentation proceeds from the assumption that philosophical accounts of consciousness and recent multidisciplinary approaches to cognition have provided valuable perspectives in the understanding of human aspects in the man-computer interrelationship and will develop this position in order to understand consciousness research as an aesthetic inquiry.

To illustrate this, the model of Transparent Act will be introduced as a paradigm that detaches itself from previous aesthetic models and argues for a novel philosophical conceptualisation of technology mediated creation. A consequence of such an approach is to bring design and artistic strategies to the same platform and, as it is will be argued, introduces a radical approach to creative production. As a practical example the presentation will introduce a discussion of the large scale interactive installation of Mind Cupola which aims to apply the approaches represent in Transparent Act and suggest new ways of meaning production through biofeedback interface.

more info:
http://www-typo3.cs.ucl.ac.uk/research/tesla/how_to_think_about_art_and_design_in_the_age_of_consciousness/
http://tesla-ucl.blogspot.com/2010/04/dr-brigitta-zics-artist-media.html

Web-site: http://www.trans-techresearch.net/?page_id=26, www.zics.eu

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  • 1. How  to  think  about  Art  and  Design  in  the    Age  of  Consciousness  Research   Dr.  Brigi:a  Zics   Transtechnology  Research   University  of  Wales  Newport   Room  B321  Portland  Square   School  of  Art,  Media  and  Design   University  of  Plymouth   Room  J  14  Caerleon  Campus   Drake  Circus   Lodge  Road,  Caerleon   Plymouth   Newport   PL4  8AA   NP18  3QT  
  • 2. Technology  art  interacLon  technology-­‐based   art  passive  interacLon  arLst-­‐spectator   Immediacy  meaning  creaLon  human-­‐machine   acLve  spectatorship  cogniLve-­‐based  invisiblity   transparency  consciousness  body-­‐mind  nexus   embodied  knowledge  phenomenology  mastering  the  tool   knowledge-­‐seeking  transdisciplinary   biofeedback  eye-­‐tracking  cogniLve-­‐feedback  loop   Transparent  Act  
  • 3. The  Problem   How   Technology  as  CreaLon  Process   j and   Technology  as  Art  (  &  Design)   understood  in  contemporary  literature,   InsLtuLons  and  among  pracLLoners?  
  • 4. The  Problem   InsLtuLonalisaLon  of  Art  does  not  provide  a   plaVorm  for  Technology  as  Art     Technology-­‐based  Art  
  • 5. The  ExisLng  Models   DualisLc  Approaches  to  CreaLve  PracLces:     ART    DESIGN   ART    TECHNOLOGY   ART    SCIENCE     ART    RESEARCH  
  • 6. The  SoluLon   Critiquing Contemporary Frameworks and Strategies BEYOND CURRENT BEYOND DISCIPLINES BEYOND INSTITUTIONAL CREATION PROCESSES FORMS
  • 7. video: http://www.vimeo.com/11303681
  • 8. Technology  brought  radical  change     to  creaLon  processes…      Challenging  old  form  of     disciplines  and  insLtuLons    
  • 9. DualisLc  Strategies  loose  their  Validity         ART    DESIGN   ART    TECHNOLOGY   ART    SCIENCE     ART    RESEARCH   ART  IN  MUSEUM    TECHNOLOGY  IN   EVERYDAY  LIFE    
  • 10.  Technology  Transdisciplinarity    ‘…transdisciplinarity  concerns  that  which  is  at  once  between   the  disciplines,  across  the  different  disciplines,  and  beyond  all   discipline.  Its  goal  is  the  understanding  of  the  present  world  ,   of  which  one  of  the  imperaLves  is  the  unity  of  knowledge.’      (Nicolescu  1997,  np.)   Arts Technology Philosophy Psychology Sciences
  • 11. Applying  Technology  not  as  Science     Technology How philosophy might help us practicioners to implement technology in a way that is different to the scientific modality?  rejecting the assumption that as technology emerged through a scientific validation process therefore it only applicable effectively in this context.
  • 12. Technology  Recovering  New  QualiLes     Technology of  Human  Experience     Interactive technology introduces a new potentiality to art, or possibly art uncovers unforeseen potentials… The means of aesthetic enquiry might, in this context, reveal or recover yet unknown or forgotten qualities of human condition and experience.
  • 13. Technology:  The  Radical  Change     to  CreaLon  Processes     •  Dynamicity     •  ArLst  –  Spectator  relaLonship  became:   Human  –  Computer  relaLonship   •  Thinking  about  Experience  differently   •  AestheLcs  based  on  human  acLon  
  • 14. Dynamic Experience transformed the spectator to active participant Artist –Spectator Relationship Zics 2007/2008
  • 15. RevisiLng  DualisLc  Concepts  of  Philosophy:   •  Invisible-­‐Visible   •  Ready-­‐to-­‐hand  –  Present-­‐to-­‐hand   (Heidegger,  1927)     •  Technology  as  funcLon    -­‐  Technology  as   Meaning   •   ArLst  -­‐  Spectator   •  Body  –  Mind  
  • 16. Philosophy  of  Technology   Heidegger’s    ‘ Tool’  as  Technology     Invisibility  and  Visibility    ready-­‐at-­‐handiness   present-­‐at-­‐handiness   where  the  user  is    describe  situaLons   already  a  master  of   where  a  person   the  tool   afends  directly  to   the  object  with   conscious  intent    INVISIBILITY       VISIBILITY  
  • 17. Heidegger’s    ‘ Tool’  in  ApplicaLon   Invisibility  and  Visibility    ready-­‐at-­‐handiness   present-­‐at-­‐handiness   where  the  user  is    describe  situaLons   already  a  master  of   where  a  person   the  tool   afends  directly  to   the  object  with   conscious  intent    TECHNOLOGY  AS    TECHNOLOGY  AS   FUNCTION     MEANING   BUT  NOT  AS  FAILED   FUNCTION  
  • 18. ‘present-­‐at-­‐hand’  -­‐  Technology  as  Meaning     ‘ARTISTIC  CONTENT  SEEKING’     (Meaning  CreaLon)   Acquiring  Knowledge  through  AestheLcs   ‘ready-­‐to-­‐hand’  –  Technology  as  FuncLon     ‘MASTERING  THE  INTERFACE’   Acquiring  FuncLonal  Knowledge  
  • 19. ‘present-­‐at-­‐hand’  -­‐  Technology  as  Meaning     Meaning creation here refers to process of the spectator interaction with the artwork which creates new meaning. ’Exploring the meaning of the interface itself’ (Rokeby 1995, p.133) Rorschach Test As Umberto Eco described meaning in his crucial work Open Work (1989) it is not a ‘content’ or message’ but it is the artist’s anticipation of multiple engagement of the spectator.  
  • 20. ‘ready-­‐to-­‐hand’  –  Technology  as  FuncLon     ‘MASTERING  THE  INTERFACE’   Acquiring  FuncLonal  Knowledge   Known as Design Approach: The learning process of the the technological tool. The aim is to achieve interactions affording continuous and immersive states.
  • 21. Going  beyond  Heidegger’s  concept:   Invisibility  Versus  Transparency    It  could  be  suggested,  that  a  disLncLon  can  be  made   between  facilitaLng  a  stage  between  the  purely   invisible  and  visible  stages  of  interacLon,  through   understanding  the  interacLve  process  as    levels  of  transparency  (Zics  2008)   Visibility Visibility
  • 22. Transparent  Technology   meaning production transparency interface man mastering the tool Transparency  in  the  human  –  technology  relaLonship  could   be  considered  as  an  oscillaLng  process  where  the   arLst  allows  interacLons  that  are  in  a  constant  state  of  flux   between  reflecLon  and  pellucidity.  
  • 23. Transparent  Technology     .   This  implies  that  these  interfaces  incorporates  a   reflecLon  process  (being  visible)  as  a  meaning   creaEon  into  the  interacLon,  favouring  a  learning   process  of  the  user  to  inhabit  novel  meaning.     meaning production mastering the tool
  • 24. Transparency   ArLst  –  Spectator  RelaLonship   ApplicaLon  of  transparency  implies  to  produce  an  immediacy   between  the  arLst  and  spectator  producing  novel  knowledge   for  the  spectator.     The  creaLon  process    (  arLst)    and  experience  process     (spectator)  becomes  one  cogniLve  flow.   spectator artist
  • 25. The  Transparent  Act     The productive cognitive act of mastering the tool .   (immersion) and meaning creation (reflection) anticipated by the artist with an outcome of novel knowledge production. • The aestheticisation of the artist-spectator relationship • Level of transparency’ relates to successful cognitive interconnections between artist and spectator reflection TRANS-PARENT TRANS-DISCIPLINARY immersion
  • 26. Transparency  produce  a  soluLon  to  the  dualisLc     qualiLes  of     •  Invisible-­‐Visible   •  Ready-­‐to-­‐hand  –  Present-­‐to-­‐hand   (Heidegger,  1927)     •  Technology  as  funcLon    -­‐  Technology  as   Meaning   •  ArLst  -­‐  Spectator    Body  –  Mind  
  • 27. Body  –  Mind   relates  to  the  qualiEes  of  material  and   immaterial  and  the  quality  of  their   interconnecLon    
  • 28. Body  –  Mind   the  body-­‐mind  nexus  operate  as  an  aestheLc   tool  in  the  design  of  spectator’s  experience  
  • 29. Technology-­‐based  Art   J. Gibson (1950) Luc Desnoyers (2008) Original by Ernst Mach’s (1897) Alva Noë (2001) suggests: Art might not only re-produce an idealistic representation of a room but rather demonstrate the sensation of “being in the room“.
  • 30. Art  Works  Considering     Body-­‐Mind  Nexus   Peter Weibel Julius von Bismarck Peter Weibel Joachim Sauter & Dirk Luesebrink BIOS team Alvin Lucier Click  on  the  pictures   Shawn Lawson & Wafaa Bilal Takehito Etani Nam June Paik Gordon Pask
  • 31. The  Mind  Cupola,   An  AffecLve  Environment   AffecLve/AffecLon   Biofeedback  Technology   CogniLve  Feedback  Loop   Passive  InteracLon  (  or  AffecLve   InteracLon)  
  • 32. Affect/  AffecLon   …either word denotes a personal feeling (sentiment in Deleuze and Guattai). ….an ability to affect and be affected. It is a prepersonal intensity corresponding to the passage from one experiential state of the body to another and implying an augmentation or diminution in that body’s capacity to act. (Massumi on Deleuze and Guattai 1987, xvii)
  • 33. Affect/  AffecLon   Applying Affection in Creation Process: …way of anticipating the spectator’s cognitive reactions and setting up a bodily semantics and aesthetics for each interaction.
  • 34. ‘present-­‐at-­‐hand’  -­‐  Technology  as  Meaning     ‘MEANING  CREATION’  –  REFLECTION   ACTIONS PREDICT NEW MEANINGS If we understand the ‘mastering the interface’ processes as producing new meaning through particular body states we might find a more effective way of interaction. ‘ready-­‐to-­‐hand’  –  Technology  as  FuncLon     ‘MASTERING THE INTERFACE’ - INVISIBILITY   INHABITED ACTIONS of the BODY
  • 35. Transparent  Act  in  the  Mind  Cupola    The  success  of  the  mastering   of  the  interface  is  based  on   the  success  of  the  arLst  in   implemenLng  the  cogniLve   qualiLes  (‘AFFECTIONS’)  of   the  user  in  such  a  way  that   the  technological   engagements  become   embodied,  producing  new   knowledge.  
  • 36. Affective Technology: Biofeedback interface Interaction: through cognitively inclusive sensorimotor capacities of the user Cognitive-driven Interaction: self-regulating processes In the user’s experience
  • 37. Biofeedback  ApplicaLon  for  InteracLon   Producing  Aesthe7c    Experiences   Laura Colmenares Guerra - Lungs: The Breather 2008 Christa Sommerer & Laurent Mignonneau: Mobile Feelings 2002/03 These artistic works investigated the interconnection between cognitive processes and aesthetic meaning production BIOS - Bidirectional Input/Output System 2002/03 Andrea Polli: Intuitive Ocusonics, Eye-driven sound interface Bioofeedback Art Archive on MediaArt 1998 Tube: http://www.youtube.com/view_play_list?p=C51BC89CDE587C1F
  • 38. Biofeedback  and  InteracLon   Measuring  bodily  funcLons:   facial  expression    EEG  for  brain  acLvity    ECG  for  heart  rate    EMG  for  electrical  discharge  in  the  muscle  fibres    eye-­‐tracking   EOG  for  the  resLng  potenLal  of  the  reLna      GSR  for  electrical  qualiLes  of  the  skin    Meaning Production: Evaluating the Cognitive Qualities of the Spectator
  • 39. Passive Interaction>< Active Interaction video: http://www.vimeo.com/7062293 Examples of Active Interaction: Iwai Toshio, Nishibori Ty: Tenori-On 2005 Brigitta Zics - Mirror_SPACE 2004/05 ACTIVE INTERACTION: Bodily Controlled Interface; full body immersion, active bodily motion. tangible interfaces PASSIVE INTERACTION: Cognitive Response Evaluation of the Spectator Digital Luthiers: Reactable, 2003/05 Squidsoup - Driftnet, Responsive Environnent 2007
  • 40. Passive  InteracLon    Passive  InteracEon  refer  to  interacLon  that  acLvate   parLcluar  body-­‐awareness  of  the  sepcectators;  it  applies   affecLve  bodily  responses  as  meaning  creaLon.     The  terminology  is  used  to  diffrenLate  art  works  from  acLve   interacLon    that  uses  tangible  or  full  body  interfaces)  since   passive  interacLon  parLcularly  intersted  in  the  cogniLve   responses  and  their  evaulaLon  of  the  spectator.   Technological  applicaLons  are  affecLve  compuLng  or  instant   affecLon  technologies.  
  • 41. The  Mind  Cupola:  Passive  InteracLon    Users  are  invited  to  step  into  the   The  interacLon  process  fluctuates   immersive  surroundings  and   between  the  natural  reacEons  of   relax.     facial  and  eye  movement  and   controlled  responses  through   which  the  user  learns  to  produce   meaning.    
  • 42. The  Mind  Cupola  interface  is  formed  of  three  interconnected  systems:   • a  biofeedback  percepLve  system  (face/eye  capture  system)  –AffecLve  compuLng   •   a  frequency-­‐generaLng  affecLve  system  –  Instant  affecLon  technologies   •   real-­‐Lme  visualisaLon  /  digital  readout  –  AffecLve  visualisaLon  
  • 43. Passive  InteracLon   Self-­‐reflecLve  Process  Meaning    The  Transparent  Act  is  a  result  of  self-­‐reflecLve   process  when  the  user  re-­‐evaluates  his/her   knowledge  of  ‘being-­‐in  the-­‐world’  afaching  new   meaning  to  it.       through  self-­‐reflecLon  the  user  might  start  to  act   against  his/her  embodied  acLons    This  new  meaning  producEon:      fluctuates  with  the  insLnct  and  unconscious  acLons   of  human  acLon  which  helps  to  maintain  the   cogniLve  flow  in  the  interacLon.  
  • 44. CogniLve  Feedback  Loop   InterconnecLng  AffecLve    CompuLng  (monitoring  the  user)     with  Instant  AffecLon  technologies  (affecLng  the  user)   to  subject  the  parLcipant  to  intenLonal  decisions  to  operate  the  system.    
  • 45.  1.  AffecLve  CompuLng    AffecLve  compuLng  invesLgates  the  relaEonship   between  emoEon  and  cogniEve  processes  and  how   the  tracking  and  evaluaLon  of  this  informaLon  helps   to  produce  more  qualitaEve  interacEons  between   human  and  machine.      (Picard  2000)   Mainly  focuses  on:  facial  qualiEes  and  how  parLcular   affecLons  reflect  on  the  facial  physiology   Customized Open Source Eye- tracking System Track Eye v2.0
  • 46. AffecLve  VisualisaLon  
  • 47. AffecLve  VisualisaLon  through  Eye-­‐tracking   •  The  visualisaLon  engages  the   user  with  percepEve  affecEon   that  requires  both  insLnctual   and  conscious  control  to  form  a   relaLonship  through   interacLon.     •  Whilst  the  user  might  look  for   hidden  messages  on  the  display   by  using  the  gaze  of  their  eyes   as  a  control  mechanism,  at  the   same  Lme  they  change  their   environment  through  the   behavioural  analysis  of  the   system.    
  • 48. SemanLcs  of  the  VisualisaLon     Neuro-linguistic Application
  • 49. SemanLcs  -­‐  E-­‐Trans  Board   Applied  by  Paralyzed  People  as     CommunicaLon  Device      E-­‐Trans  comprises  a  sheet  of  perspex  a  bit  bigger  than  A4.    Lefers  of  the  alphabet  are  grouped  in  each  corner  of  the  board.  Within   each  corner  group,  all  the  lefers  are  a  different  colour.  There  are  also   six  coloured  blobs  arranged  around  the  board.   Source:  hfp://www.eyelife.org/  
  • 50. SemanLcs  of  ImaginaLon   New  Scien7st  describes  a  46-­‐year-­‐old  woman  who  was  totally   locked-­‐in.     CommunicaLon  through  measuring  the  pH  of  saliva.     They  trained  the  woman  to  change  the  acidity  of  her  spit  by   imagining  either  the  taste  of  lemon,  or  the  taste  of  milk.     She  learned  to  push  the  pH  one  way  to  say  "yes",  the  other  to   say  "no".’  
  • 51. 2.  Instant  AffecLon  Technologies   are  Technologies  that  affect  the  spectator's  cogniLon  instantly  as  a  response    (  by  meaning  creaLon)  to  their  interacLon  with  the  system     Electromagnetic Devices: Sound, Vibration, Radiations, Mechanical Vibrations and Affective Visualisation System Instant Cognitive Affection of the User
  • 52. AffecLve     Environment   These affection devices generate a spectrum of electromagnetic frequencies of sound, hot and cold stream and visual affects to guide the person towards an optimal experience. An amplification of everyday affection of environment of human cognitive faculties
  • 53. Passive  InteracLon  as  CogniLve  Feedback  Loop    The  mastering  of  the  Mind  Cupola  implies   that  the  user  learns  and  lives  the  rules  of   interacLon  that  is  built  upon  the   percepEve/a:enEve  qualiLes  and   thermodynamic/electromagneEc   qualiLes  of  the  body,  through  which  they   have  the  potenLal  to  control  their  own   responses.    The  system,  is  based  on  behavioural   analysis  and  the  thermodynamic   features,  afempt  to  balance  the  user’s   response  with  heaEng  and  cooling  his/ her  face.  
  • 54. New Applications: Enhancing Well-being Mind Cupola offers a radical knowledge practice acting through bodily capacities that establish a heuristic quality to learning. As this kind of passive interactions produce new embodied knowledge with increase of psychophysical control of the body, they might provide potential therapeutic and health-promotion applications which provides a main objective of future research into biofeedback art
  • 55.  TRANSDISCIPLANRY  SOLUTION:  situated  at  the  intersecLon  of   art  &  design,  arLficial  intelligence  and  consciousness  studies.   APPLICATION  in  NEW  DESCIPLINES:  providing  a  learning  process   that  evaluates  and  afends  to  the  level  of  cogniLve  immersion   and  stress  on  the  user  and  alters  levels  of  affecLon   accordingly.     Although  the  Mind  Cupola  was  formulated  on  the  basis  of   being  an  arEsEc  intervenEon  as  opposed  to  a  ‘designed’   purpose  as  a  transdispilnary  soluLon  provide  new  insights   in  Design,  Science  and  Philosophy.  
  • 56. Produced  a  SoluLon  to     •  Invisible-­‐Visible   •  Ready-­‐to-­‐hand  –  Present-­‐to-­‐hand   •  (Heidegger,  1927)     •  Technology  as  funcLon    -­‐  Technology  as   Meaning   •   Body  –  Mind   •  ArLst  -­‐  Spectator  
  • 57. DualisLc  Strategies  loose  their  Validity    Transdisciplinarity         ART    DESIGN   ART    TECHNOLOGY   ART    SCIENCE     ART    RESEARCH   ART  IN  MUSEUM    TECHNOLOGY  IN   EVERYDAY  LIFE    
  • 58. TRANS-PARENT TRANS-DISCIPLINARY Technology  brought  all  disciplines  to  the  same  plaVorm.   Understanding  Technology    Consciousness  Research   All  PlaVorms  and  Disciplines  can  benefit  from  Consciousness   Research.   Current  PracLces  challenging  the  boundaries  of   disciplines,  approaches,  modaliLes  and  ideologies.       Call  for  the  need  of  a  re-­‐evaluaLon  of  insLtuLonal  formats  and   plaVorms.  
  • 59. Art and Design in the Age of Consciousness Research ©  David  Coppit   @ Dr Brigitta Zics TransTechnology resreach University of Wales Newport / University of Plymouth/ www.zics.eu brigitta.zics@newport.ac.uk or brigittaopal@gmail.com

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