Talking Taxonomy: Panel Discussion

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Panel discussion for the 2012 Ingeniux User Conference, featuring Champlain College, CASE, University of the Pacific and St. Louis University

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  • Categorization is how we assign labels to aid in searching and sorting. \nIn the broadest sense on the Web, categorization drives the organization of site navigation. It’s what helps us decide what page belongs under “About Us” vs. “Academic Programs.”\nEffective categorization lets users find information quickly.\nOn the Web, categorization has evolved into the sophisticated use of what’s often called “taxonomy.”\n
  • \n\nTaxonomy takes us back to grade school. \nThink kingdoms, phyla, classes and orders\nthe animal kingdom as different from the plant kingdom,\nanthropods as different from mammals.\n\nWhen taxonomy is applied to the Web, you see some differences. \nOften assigns numerous parallel categories to the same object — an approach that is called, among other things, conceptual or contextual taxonomy. \n(The term “conceptual clustering” also describes a computer concept focused on machine learning.)\n
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  • One piece of content might be tagged with the indisputable “photo” and “puppies,” as well as the much more subjective “cute.” \n\nUser-defined categorization is also sometimes called “folksonomy.”\n\nFor those of us less focused on the minutiae of proper vocabulary, applications of categorization, taxonomy and user-defined categorization are often just generically referred to as “tags.”\n
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  • Talking Taxonomy: Panel Discussion

    1. 1. Brian Andrews, Champlain CollegeKaren Buck, Zehno Cross Media CommunicationsJanna Crabb, Council for Advancement and Support ofEducationJohn McClimans, University of the PacificMark Rimar, Saint Louis UniversityTalking Taxonomy:Learn from our greatest hits and missesusing the Ingeniux taxonomyfunctionalityIngeniux User Conference 2012Seattle, Washington
    2. 2. What Is Taxonomy?
    3. 3. Taxonomy (from www.gxdeveloperweb.com/) Mutually exclusive in the biology world
    4. 4. Clustering
    5. 5. Clustering and Aggregating An organizational category of meaning or metadata Conceptual, faceted or contextual clustering can be quite extendable Clusters and facets could be defined – by topic – by media type – by department – by media type – by attribute – by functionality – by audience – etc.
    6. 6. How to Apply Taxonomy?
    7. 7. Channeling Jim:What’s your business case?
    8. 8. Marketing & Content EngagementBenefits Search engine optimization Improved navigation & findability Easier syndication & integration of like content Longer engagement with site – Surfers – Taskmasters Greater likelihood to take action
    9. 9. Models to Learn From
    10. 10. Models to Learn From
    11. 11. Models to Learn From
    12. 12. Search Engine Optimization
    13. 13. Search Engine Optimization – Taxonomy- driven redesign – Time on site doubled – Pages/visitor doubled – Applications and quality up
    14. 14. Sharing Our IngeniuxTaxonomy Experiences
    15. 15. Council for Advancementand Support of Education
    16. 16. Goals Use taxonomy to push content at site visitors based on their area of interest, region or institution type Use taxonomy to pull together all resources on a given topic, regardless of type of content Pull in related resources, products and conferences on a page (for example, a conference or product page) Flexibility to update and change site easily as taxonomy changes
    17. 17. Challenges Content has to be tagged correctly for content to display correctly Our CMS users often don’t know that a tag page can have impact across the site Our review team is not large enough to effectively review all content regularly
    18. 18. University of the Pacific
    19. 19. Started using taxonomyin October 2011 with awebsite redesignDesigned to functionwithin two maincategories:– Informational– FunctionalPrimarily use for:– Organizing Content– Content Reuse and Syndication
    20. 20. Content Reuse and Syndication Old site, news was decentralized – Recreating news pages – Out of date content Redesigned site: Centralized newsroom – Taxonomy-driven syndication
    21. 21. Content Population A-Z Directory Media Pages Employee Newsletter
    22. 22. Employee Newsletter Content is categorized within the CMS Via an XML feed, content is dynamically drawn into the newsletter template of our email marketing software
    23. 23. Champlain College
    24. 24. Goals Promote a recently developed mobile site specifically for prospective Undergraduates Promote a “Sign up for Text Updates” campaign to prospective Undergraduates Provide forms for visitors to sign up for text updates
    25. 25. St. Louis University
    26. 26. An Evolution of Taxonomy In the early stages of utilizing the latest integrated Ingeniux CMS Taxonomy, but we have traditionally used a multi-select tool to categorize pages for about six years The multi-select tool: the Grandfather of All Taxonomi We will be using the new tool in many similar ways as we have in the past. – Some of the areas we have already developed and will continue to expand, include topic and news based as well as related content
    27. 27. With multi-select tool,we now categorizeevery page and severalcomponent typesspecifically for – university top level – a college – a degree-granting center or divisionWe use a secondaryclassification tocategorize departmentsor sub-areasWith multi-select, wedeliver specific versionsof the main Universityweb site templatethrough combination ofprogramming andcomponents
    28. 28. Categorization Helps SLU Remain consistent with our overall brand for our web site Manage and deliver the 40+ site templates – The different versions of templates are consistent to each other and an overall branded look and feel. – Certain header graphic elements and rotating photo banners that appear at top of body copy area site remain locked down. – Departments must work with web team for photo banners and graphic standards and conventions are followed by web team for header graphics. Empower our web team professionals in their fields of expertise – Helps Web Services compensate for and best serve the varying skill levels of developing web content at our institution. Not all 300-350 of our users are exceptional content or web developers!
    29. 29. Some Content is Also Delivered viaMulti-select News articles are tagged and pushed to specific page types from a centralized media and communications team Content pushed to slu.edu homepage and college, school and center home pages Pushed content is based more on our organizational structure than topic related
    30. 30. Taxonomy Better Manages TheseElements browser title bar: name of each section is pulled and displayed via variables for SEO graphics: rotating header banner and profile photos can be used/reused in different sections navigations: specific sections receive locked down navigation (no longer in use) meta data: sometimes, a basic set of keywords has been added to a section (no longer in use) Google Custom Search: law school only searched for pages containing "SLU LAW" Google Analytics: each unit once had a unique tracking code hidden pixel cookie tracking codes: specific marketing campaigns sometimes need to track specific pages
    31. 31. New and Future Use of Taxonomy We will be launching our redesigned beabilliken.com microsite next week Articles and videos will be categorized to pulled back to The new site will take advantage of taxonomies by: – homepage slider – specific sections used for related content – archive pages
    32. 32. Quiz Your Panelists
    33. 33. For more case studies and how-totips, check out Zehno white papersand

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