Did You Get the Memo? Print's Dead.

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How to reposition yourself as strategic and essential.

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  • Charles Dickens: “It was the best of times, it was the worst times.” In England: height of British empire, giant strides in science and culture. But also Plagues, poverty, Jack the Ripper On campuses: recognized as world’s top educational institutions, maybe even have a winning football team. But also time of budget cuts, job uncertainty. But on campus the message is pretty clear: times are tight. And even if the economy returns to its pre-meltdown state, it may take a while for campus budgets to bounce back. If you work at a private institution, the endowment has shown signs of recovery but probably still has a ways to grow. At state schools, you may face several budgets cycles before the public coffers get back in the black. To address the big budget cuts of the past couple years, many communications shops switched into survival mode. They suffered through the cutbacks—hacking programs and reducing staff—and now are just waiting for the economy to recover.
  • There’s an upside to down times Down times are good times to rethink business as usual. If you’ve ever been frustrated by how slowly things move in education, Hey at least things are moving.
  • Focus is on financial bottom line, not the strategic bottom line. Tendency during budget cuts to look at a target number and just hack away until you get to that Strategic bottom line says: how do we cut and still get the results?
  • Always a great question. Unleashes creative thinking . Encourages people to look beyond silos. Helps good ideas to bubble up (from lower levels) in the institution. Not all good ideas come from the top. What if we stopped printing a viewbook? What if we did multiple smaller ones? What if we produced one great institutionwide magazine instead of 3 crappy ones for individual schools? What if we combined forces with another unit on campus? What if we put resources behind Facebook? What could we do that nobody else is doing yet?
  • It’s also good to think outside the industry What would Nike do? What would Old Spice do? What would Apple do?
  • Xerox experimented with paperless office in the 60s. Even had a primitive version of e-mail. It mostly worked until the phone rang and you had to take a message. Web, Kindle, Ipad changed the landscape. Kindle announced this month it’s going to double the payout for newspapers and magazines who produce for Kindl. Tight budgets: print seems expendable. Know of a school where they cut the alumni magazine and said build something online with no resources to do it. Another school that said no print unless some requests it. Another school that cut the communications staff in half, then half again.
  • Even though many of our shops do probably at least 50 percent of work is web or electronic, the idea of the publications office persists. We’re thought of as logo police, comma catchers, the people that say no when you want to break the rules on your business cards. But the truth is that publications people possess essential skills: •Understanding marketing messages and target audiences • Ability to get projects organized and completed • Knowledge of campus structure and stories • Strong writing, web, design skills
  • Today I want to talk about we as publications professionals can reposition ourselves with in the insitution. So Rethink: to improve your image as strategist. Reorder: for maximum impact in marketing results Recycle: to make yourself essential in the university content (supply chain”: the content strategist Redesign: to remind people of your unique talents in telling the institution’s story
  • Nobody has it tougher these days than magazines. Outside world: good titles going under • 2 of my Xmas gifts died—got switched to Star • Many getting smaller every issue On campus: starting to see the same • Many have cut budgets or pages or issues • Some have cut staff • Lot of schools: another round of cuts ahead • Magazine is a prime target because it’s a big ticket item So let’s walk through some examples of people doing a great job of not just redesigning a publication, but rethinking everything about it
  • Newsweek: In 24/7 news world, they changed focus
  • Front section: cool articles. Ran one after the other.
  • Standard feature
  • Back section: care review, wines to buy, how to invest.
  • Back page: always a column
  • New cover, emphasizes New Week
  • More provocative covers, surprising
  • Front section: clearer delineation between stories, strong sense about which part of the world is covered (flag graphics, too)
  • Not ashamed to advertise itself
  • Front section: more variety in writing formats. Lots of hooks, humor.
  • New approach to features.
  • Info graphics
  • Sarah Lawrence Magazine wasn’t as interesting and creative as the school “Looks like a nursing home.”
  • Sarah Lawrence Magazine wasn’t as interesting and creative as the school “Looks like a nursing home.”
  • Sarah Lawrence Magazine wasn’t as interesting and creative as the school “Looks like a nursing home.”
  • Sarah Lawrence Magazine wasn’t as interesting and creative as the school “Looks like a nursing home.”
  • Sarah Lawrence Magazine wasn’t as interesting and creative as the school “Looks like a nursing home.”
  • Sarah Lawrence Magazine wasn’t as interesting and creative as the school “Looks like a nursing home.”
  • Sarah Lawrence Magazine wasn’t as interesting and creative as the school “Looks like a nursing home.”
  • Sarah Lawrence Magazine wasn’t as interesting and creative as the school “Looks like a nursing home.”
  • Sarah Lawrence Magazine wasn’t as interesting and creative as the school “Looks like a nursing home.”
  • Sarah Lawrence Magazine wasn’t as interesting and creative as the school “Looks like a nursing home.”
  • Sarah Lawrence Magazine wasn’t as interesting and creative as the school “Looks like a nursing home.”
  • Sarah Lawrence Magazine wasn’t as interesting and creative as the school “Looks like a nursing home.”
  • Sarah Lawrence Magazine wasn’t as interesting and creative as the school “Looks like a nursing home.”
  • When everybody’s busy, there’s a tendency to forget the big picture. For communications shops, the downside is that you become like Kinko’s. Projects come in, and you do them. I’ll take 50 copies on pink. Not strategic, but busy. Adding “services” to every office name didn’t help. To make yourself a key problem solver, and to improve the bottom-line results your work can achieve, you want to study the communications flow. • Some schools have elaborate charts to illustrate it • Some schools have a timeline in a Word file or Excel • A lot of schools have nothing. If you want to boost your reputation, be the person who sets it up. What is flow? • It’s identifying each audience • It’s tracking every communication they receive • It takes in all channels (print, e-mail, social media, old-fashioned letters) • It the chance for you to be the engineer your never wanted to be Every campaign should have a communications flowchart: alumni, fundraising, admisisons, other. Let’s take a look at some admissions examples     THINGS TO KEEP IN MIND Rethink your letters • Very powerful if personal (and signed) • Need to review them all: make sure the point is clear • Worked with a school that sent lots of letters, and they all started with “congratulations, on your admission to “ • Letters need to push across media: check this website, watch for an e-mail in October. • For purely transactional material, why not send an e-mail or postcard.   Give events a cross media push • Work best when cross media: • Print and e-mail invite, e-mail reminder to register, confirmation, reminder to attend: cut any of those steps and attendance dropped. Cut the print invitation: dropped by 20 percent. • Do online registration to get boost web traffic   Be sure you’ve got enough branded communications • Don’t just do the transactions: apply now, turn in this form, sign up—at every point you should reinforce the “why?” about your school • Build 3-5 e-mail templates branded with the package look (typically a general, a deadline, and invitation)   Develop sub-targets • Maybe honors students, multicultural students, out of staters • Set up mini campaigns for them • Like review personas for web development   Expand the flow beyond seniors • Lots of schools do 100/50/25 • Junior year is when most students are looking • Sophomores: hard to get enough names, not very committed   Show samples from  
  • What is flow? • It’s identifying each audience • It’s tracking every communication they receive • It takes in all channels (print, e-mail, social media, letters)—could also track personal contacts (calls, visits) • It the chance for you to be the engineer your never wanted to be Every campaign should have a communications flowchart: alumni, fundraising, admisisons, other. Let’s take a look at some admissions examples   Ambrose   TCU   THINGS TO KEEP IN MIND Rethink your letters • Very powerful if personal (and signed) • Need to review them all: make sure the point is clear • Worked with a school that sent lots of letters, and they all started with “congratulations, on your admission to “ • Letters need to push across media: check this website, watch for an e-mail in October. • For purely transactional material, why not send an e-mail or postcard.   Give events a cross media push • Work best when cross media: • Print and e-mail invite, e-mail reminder to register, confirmation, reminder to attend: cut any of those steps and attendance dropped. Cut the print invitation: dropped by 20 percent. • Do online registration to get boost web traffic   Be sure you’ve got enough branded communications • Don’t just do the transactions: apply now, turn in this form, sign up—at every point you should reinforce the “why?” about your school • Build 3-5 e-mail templates branded with the package look (typically a general, a deadline, and invitation)   Develop sub-targets • Maybe honors students, multicultural students, out of staters • Set up mini campaigns for them • Like review personas for web development   Expand the flow beyond seniors • Lots of schools do 100/50/25 • Junior year is when most students are looking • Sophomores: hard to get enough names, not very committed   Show samples from  
  • Who are the audiences? You may be missing some. What about counselors, parents, transfers? Alumni assoc: Might be missing undergrads or international alumni. • What goal do we have for each group? You want seniors to enroll, but what is it you want form sophomores? You want people to join the alumni association, but do you want anything different from new grads? Are the communications in the right order? Probably yes in a broad sense. Probably no in a strategic sense. Worked with some schools where lead contacts were transactions: invitations to events before you knew anything about the school (Amb) Or leaving parents until the end, or ignoring perceived negatives until late in the cycle (Ex. Stockton) Are we sending too much at certain times? Probably yes for your obvious audience: common in recruitment to discover that you send three messages in a row that could be combined into one. Might be dumping too much into the Bermuda Triangles between semesters. Are there gaps when we’re sending nothing? Sophomores get short get slighted—even thought students pre-decide Do we have the right mix of communications tools? Letters: probably too many or too few Print: may be short on pieces that drive to the web E-mail: probably long on transactions, short on using e-mail to promote future mailings Social media: may be missing opportunities to cross promote your mailings, face-to-face opportunities Are you covering the right messages? Strategic means saying what matters: need to do inventory of key messages Are you doing enough to show the brand? Some CRM ignoring the brand messages Every campaign should have a communications flowchart: alumni, fundraising, admissions, other. Let’s take a look at some admissions examples   Ambrose   TCU   THINGS TO KEEP IN MIND Rethink your letters • Very powerful if personal (and signed) • Need to review them all: make sure the point is clear • Worked with a school that sent lots of letters, and they all started with “congratulations, on your admission to “ • Letters need to push across media: check this website, watch for an e-mail in October. • For purely transactional material, why not send an e-mail or postcard.   Give events a cross media push • Work best when cross media: • Print and e-mail invite, e-mail reminder to register, confirmation, reminder to attend: cut any of those steps and attendance dropped. Cut the print invitation: dropped by 20 percent. • Do online registration to get boost web traffic   Be sure you’ve got enough branded communications • Don’t just do the transactions: apply now, turn in this form, sign up—at every point you should reinforce the “why?” about your school • Build 3-5 e-mail templates branded with the package look (typically a general, a deadline, and invitation)   Develop sub-targets • Maybe honors students, multicultural students, out of staters • Set up mini campaigns for them • Like review personas for web development   Expand the flow beyond seniors • Lots of schools do 100/50/25 • Junior year is when most students are looking • Sophomores: hard to get enough names, not very committed   Show samples from  
  • THINGS TO KEEP IN MIND Rethink your letters • Very powerful if personal (and signed) • Need to review them all: make sure the point is clear • Worked with a school that sent lots of letters, and they all started with “congratulations, on your admission to “ • Letters need to push across media: check this website, watch for an e-mail in October. • For purely transactional material, why not send an e-mail or postcard.   Give events a cross media push • Work best when cross media: • Print and e-mail invite, e-mail reminder to register, confirmation, reminder to attend: cut any of those steps and attendance dropped. Cut the print invitation: dropped by 20 percent. • Do online registration to get boost web traffic   Be sure you’ve got enough branded communications • Don’t just do the transactions: apply now, turn in this form, sign up—at every point you should reinforce the “why?” about your school • Build 3-5 e-mail templates branded with the package look (typically a general, a deadline, and invitation)   Develop sub-targets • Maybe honors students, multicultural students, out of staters • Set up mini campaigns for them • Like review personas for web development   Expand the flow beyond seniors • Lots of schools do 100/50/25 • Junior year is when most students are looking • Sophomores: hard to get enough names, not very committed   Show samples from  
  • THINGS TO KEEP IN MIND Rethink your letters • Very powerful if personal (and signed) • Need to review them all: make sure the point is clear • Worked with a school that sent lots of letters, and they all started with “congratulations on your admission to “ • Letters need to push across media: check this website, watch for an e-mail in October. • For purely transactional material, why not send an e-mail or postcard.   Give events a cross media push • Work best when cross media: • Print and e-mail invite, e-mail reminder to register, confirmation, reminder to attend: cut any of those steps and attendance dropped. Cut the print invitation: dropped by 20 percent. • Do online registration to get boost web traffic   Be sure you’ve got enough branded communications • Don’t just do the transactions: apply now, turn in this form, sign up—at every point you should reinforce the “why?” about your school • Build 3-5 e-mail templates branded with the package look (typically a general, a deadline, and invitation)   Develop sub-targets • Maybe honors students, multicultural students, out of staters • Set up mini campaigns for them • Like review personas for web development   Expand the flow beyond seniors • Lots of schools do 100/50/25 • Junior year is when most students are looking • Sophomores: hard to get enough names, not very committed   Show samples from  
  • Be sure you’ve got enough branded communications • Don’t just do the transactions: apply now, turn in this form, sign up—at every point you should reinforce the “why?” about your school • Build 3-5 e-mail templates branded with the package look (typically a general, a deadline, and invitation)   Develop sub-targets • Maybe honors students, multicultural students, out of staters. women • Set up mini campaigns for them • Like review personas for web development     Show samples from  
  • When I say “recycle” it sounds like a dirty word It sounds I’m encouraging you to be lazy, to just rehash the same material over and over What I want to say is this: It’s time to share well with others Communications people often know your campus as well as anyone—maybe even better than most presidents—but how are other people supposed to know that? Let’s say you work on a magazine: You produce a brilliant cover story with amazing photos and mail it out. People read it but that’s it It dies a slow death on 25,000 coffee tables across America But it you focus more on sharing with other units on campus, your great work can have a second life Value of sharing with others • Boosts institutional story telling • Communicates with impact (magazine editors seem to do better than anyone else) • Promotes your work—magazine, web, other—because everything gets a cross media push • Promotes you a campus expert: IMPORTANT
  • Couple of key areas to start sharing with: Institutional website • At many schools the techies are still in control (and media relations gets one corner). • Needs great stories • Websites used to be about sorting info—but now about telling institution’s stories • Would give your magazine more prominence Athletics • Those program books and TV “image ads” are begging for good stories. • Seen by thousands, but the info usually isn’t very good Media relations/magazine/pubs office • Many times you’re working telling the same stories. • Why not collaborate more by sharing photo shoots, interviews, videos, background research? • Why not schedule a coordinated rollout of major stories? • More collab would make all your units look good • Smaller schools do OK; big schools treat the two functions as separate Admissions Magazines EXAMPLE OF HOW IT CAN WORK New trend in admissions is viewbooks that are more like magazines. • It’s editorial driven • Multiple issues instead of a one-shot deal • Uses the techniques that mag editors know better than anyone else To put it bluntly: You have material (and knowledge) they want. They have a budget you want. Why not collaborate? Example: collaborative photo shoots. Share faculty and student profiles They’ve got good story ideas because they know everybody But whether the communications are handled in-house or by an outside company, admissions is always hunting for the best stories and photos. Added benefit: At most schools the admissions communications flow is big and robust. They’ve got expertise in developing coordinated cross-media campaigns, working with target audiences, using social media. You can get ideas from them on how to promote the magazine.  
  • THINK CROSS MEDIA REPEATED MESSAGES MAKES THE MOST OF STAFF TIME AND SCHOOL RESOURCES
  • Typical chart Key message, story summary, timeframe, content format (writing, photos, audio, video) More complex: CRM, web  
  • LOOK AT SAMPLES What’s a redesign about? Right messages to the right audiences in the right communications channels. One part is stylistic. Keeping up with your audience. Stay relevant in the marketplace of everything audience members see. The other part is capturing what your institution is all about. By communicating about your institution’s core, you’ll turn on the right people (and turn out the wrong people).
  • Who says Math isn’t sexy? Marble cover equals prestige.
  • “ The excitement continues”. When does it begin? Career goldmine> But are the blocks of gold or sticks of butter?
  • Intellectual capital--journal
  • Graphic on the inside
  • Front sections
  • feature
  • COlumn
  • Brings in web
  • front
  • feature
  • Did You Get the Memo? Print's Dead.

    1. 2. Are these good times or bad? <ul><li>“ It was the best of times, it was the worst of times.” </li></ul><ul><li>Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities </li></ul>
    2. 3. What can you do? <ul><li>Should you suffer? </li></ul><ul><li>Strap yourself in? </li></ul><ul><li>Sit on your hands? </li></ul><ul><li>Strategize? </li></ul>
    3. 4. Questions to ask during down times <ul><li>What’s working? What could work better? </li></ul><ul><li>What do our audiences want? </li></ul><ul><li>Are we spending our resources on the right things? </li></ul><ul><li>What does success look like now? In the future? </li></ul><ul><li>What are the key institutional messages? Are they getting through? </li></ul><ul><li>Can we send some sacred cows to the glue factory? </li></ul>
    4. 5. Questions to ask <ul><li>What if? </li></ul>
    5. 6. Questions to ask <ul><li>W.W.N.D? </li></ul><ul><li>W.W.O.S.D? </li></ul><ul><li>W.W.A.D? </li></ul>
    6. 7. Is print dead? <ul><li>Paperless office still hasn’t come to be. </li></ul><ul><li>New technologies shaking things up. </li></ul><ul><li>On some campuses, print is seen as old-fashioned and expensive. </li></ul>
    7. 8. The landscape is changing
    8. 9. Print isn’t dead. It’s devalued. <ul><li>What does that mean for our careers? </li></ul>
    9. 10. For today <ul><li>Rethink. </li></ul><ul><li>Reorder. </li></ul><ul><li>Recycle. </li></ul><ul><li>Redesign. </li></ul>
    10. 11. RETHINK <ul><li>Reprinting and revising doesn’t move the needle. </li></ul><ul><li>A simple redesign changes the style, but not the substance and strategy. </li></ul><ul><li>Rethinking is a more radical—but rewarding—step. </li></ul><ul><li>Rethinking positions you as a strategist, not just a publications manager. </li></ul>
    11. 12. Newsweek
    12. 13. Newsweek
    13. 14. Newsweek
    14. 15. Newsweek
    15. 16. Newsweek
    16. 17. Newsweek
    17. 18. Newsweek
    18. 19. Newsweek
    19. 20. Newsweek
    20. 21. Newsweek
    21. 22. Newsweek
    22. 23. Newsweek
    23. 24. Sarah Lawrence
    24. 25. Sarah Lawrence
    25. 26. Sarah Lawrence
    26. 27. Sarah Lawrence
    27. 28. Sarah Lawrence
    28. 29. Sarah Lawrence
    29. 30. Sarah Lawrence
    30. 31. Sarah Lawrence
    31. 32. Sarah Lawrence
    32. 33. Sarah Lawrence
    33. 34. Sarah Lawrence
    34. 35. Sarah Lawrence
    35. 36. Sarah Lawrence
    36. 37. REORDER <ul><li>Who’s minding the big picture? </li></ul><ul><li>Does the world really need another Kinko’s? </li></ul><ul><li>Who knows the institution’s messages and tools better than you? </li></ul><ul><li>Should you go with the flow? </li></ul>
    37. 38. What is flow? <ul><li>It’s identifying each audience. </li></ul><ul><li>It’s scheduling/tracking every communication an audience receives. </li></ul><ul><li>It takes in all communications channels. </li></ul>
    38. 39. Key questions <ul><li>Who are our key audiences? </li></ul><ul><li>What goal do we have for each group? </li></ul><ul><li>Are the communications in the right order? </li></ul><ul><li>Are we sending too much at certain times? </li></ul><ul><li>Are there gaps when we’re sending nothing? </li></ul><ul><li>Do we have the right mix of communication tools? </li></ul><ul><li>Are you covering all your key messages? </li></ul><ul><li>Are you doing enough to show the overall brand? </li></ul>
    39. 40. Keep in mind <ul><li>Real letters mean something. </li></ul><ul><li>Events require a cross-media push. </li></ul><ul><li>Focus on branded messages, not just transactions. </li></ul><ul><li>Expand the flow beyond the obvious audience. </li></ul>
    40. 41. Sample flow
    41. 42. Sample flow <ul><li>Real letters mean something. </li></ul><ul><li>Events require a cross-media push. </li></ul><ul><li>Focus on branded messages, not just transactions. </li></ul><ul><li>Expand the flow beyond the obvious audience. </li></ul>
    42. 43. RECYCLE <ul><li>It’s not the same as being lazy. </li></ul><ul><li>It maximizes the good work you’ve done. </li></ul><ul><li>It requires sharing. </li></ul>
    43. 44. Sharing well with others <ul><li>Institutional website. </li></ul><ul><li>Athletics. </li></ul><ul><li>Media relations. </li></ul><ul><li>Admissions. </li></ul><ul><li>Magazines. </li></ul>
    44. 45. Editorial matrix/content strategy <ul><li>Organized around key messages. </li></ul><ul><li>Focuses on the best stories to illustrate each message. </li></ul><ul><li>Schedules when and how to tell the stories. </li></ul><ul><li>Schedules when and how to recycle the stories. </li></ul>
    45. 46. Editorial/content matrix elements <ul><li>Key message. </li></ul><ul><li>Story summary. </li></ul><ul><li>Story timeframe. </li></ul><ul><li>Content format (writing, photos, audio, video). </li></ul><ul><li>Communications tool (CRM, web, print, ads, magazine, news release, video, Facebook, etc.). </li></ul><ul><li>Person responsible and due date. </li></ul>
    46. 47. REDESIGN <ul><li>Old days: change the fonts. </li></ul><ul><li>These days: change the content. </li></ul><ul><li>You want to capture what your institution is all about. </li></ul>
    47. 48. Sometimes it’s obvious
    48. 49. Sometimes it’s obvious
    49. 50. Guess the decade
    50. 51. Guess what?
    51. 52. Columbia Business School
    52. 53. Columbia Business School
    53. 54. Columbia Business School
    54. 55. Columbia Business School
    55. 56. Columbia Business School
    56. 57. Columbia Business School
    57. 58. Columbia Business School
    58. 59. Columbia Business School
    59. 60. Columbia Business School
    60. 61. Columbia Business School
    61. 62. Columbia Business School
    62. 63. Columbia Business School
    63. 64. Columbia Business School
    64. 65. Columbia Business School
    65. 66. Columbia Business School
    66. 67. Semester at Sea
    67. 68. Semester at Sea
    68. 69. Semester at Sea
    69. 70. Semester at Sea
    70. 71. Semester at Sea
    71. 72. Semester at Sea
    72. 73. Semester at Sea
    73. 74. Semester at Sea
    74. 75. Semester at Sea
    75. 76. Semester at Sea
    76. 77. Semester at Sea
    77. 78. Semester at Sea
    78. 79. Let’s work to be <ul><li>Relevant. </li></ul><ul><li>Respected. </li></ul><ul><li>Ready to do great things. </li></ul>

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