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The Petula Clark Postulate
 

The Petula Clark Postulate

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    The Petula Clark Postulate The Petula Clark Postulate Presentation Transcript

    • The Petula Clark Postulate: Exploring CCRC’s as Revitalization Solutions for Failing Downtowns A Special Thanks to… Bruce Blalock, CEO, Lutheran Life Villages Mayor W. Suzanne Handshoe, City of Kendallville Anita Shepherd, Executive Director, Kendallville Area Chamber of Commerce Tim Stair, Mennonite Health Services Tom Leedy, Dekko Foundation Jim Leich, Executive Director, Indiana Association of Homes and Services for the Aging Rick Sherck, Executive Director, Noble County Economic Development Corporation Philip Stafford, Director, Center on Aging and Community, Indiana University Presented by Dodd Kattman and Zachary Benedict Jessica Wolfe, Bluepond, LLC at the National Conference of the Environments for Aging Tuesday, March 23, 2010, 8:15-9:15 am, San Diego, CA Copyright ©2010 by Morrison Kattman Menze, Inc.
    • “ The lights are much brighter there. You can forget all your troubles, forget all your cares. So go downtown, things'll be great when you're… Downtown - no finer place, for sure. Downtown - everything's waiting for you. ” Petula Clark (1964) THE PETULA CLARK POSTULATE 2 Environments for Aging 2010 | March 23, 2010 ©2010 Morrison Kattman Menze, Inc.
    • TOPICS 01 DEVIANT MODEL: Discuss how development patterns have transformed (Midwestern) communities and left them ill-prepared for the shifting marketplace. 02 QUALITY OF PLACE: Illustrate how evolving priorities will present a renewed sense of place and begin to level the playing field for smaller (Midwestern) cities and towns. 03 SOCIAL CATALYST: Propose how a rapidly aging demographic can be utilized as a vital resource and incentive for the revitalization of failing downtowns (throughout the Midwest). THE PETULA CLARK POSTULATE 3 Environments for Aging 2010 | March 23, 2010 ©2010 Morrison Kattman Menze, Inc.
    • Our enormous and rapidly growing older population is a vast, untapped resource. If we can engage these individuals in ways that fill urgent gaps in our society, the result will be a windfall for American civic life in the twenty-first century. Marc Freedman Prime Time: How Baby Boomers Will Revolutionize Retirement and Transform America (1999) THE PETULA CLARK POSTULATE 4 Environments for Aging 2010 | March 23, 2010 ©2010 Morrison Kattman Menze, Inc.
    • PART ONE DEVIANT MODEL rich old criminals sick creatives normal educated poor THE PETULA CLARK POSTULATE 5 Environments for Aging 2010 | March 23, 2010 loud ©2010 Morrison Kattman Menze, Inc.
    • IMPLICATIONS THE PETULA CLARK POSTULATE 6 Environments for Aging 2010 | March 23, 2010 ©2010 Morrison Kattman Menze, Inc.
    • IMPLICATIONS 80+ million DISCONNECTED seen Suburban living in this country is becoming more of an epidemic than a development methodology when you consider that in 2000 “80 million Americans were either too young, too old, or too poor to drive.” Andres Duany, Elizabeth Plater-Zyberk and Jeff Speck, Suburban Nation: the Rise of Sprawl and the Decline of the American Dream (2000), pg 115 THE PETULA CLARK POSTULATE 7 Environments for Aging 2010 | March 23, 2010 ©2010 Morrison Kattman Menze, Inc.
    • IMPLICATIONS 65+ Demographic Projections 100 Millions of Americans 65+ 75 50 71.5 MILLION 25 0 2000 2010 2020 2030 *Projections as of July 2004 per U. S. Census Bureau THE PETULA CLARK POSTULATE 8 Environments for Aging 2010 | March 23, 2010 ©2010 Morrison Kattman Menze, Inc.
    • IMPLICATIONS MODEL DEVIANT DIAGRAM EMERGING TREND “Incrementalism is the death of Innovation” -Tom Peters The Circle of Innovation CURRENT TREND GROWTH TIME CREATIVE DESTRUCTION THE PETULA CLARK POSTULATE Environments for Aging 2010 | March 23, 2010 9 ©2010 Morrison Kattman Menze, Inc.
    • IMPLICATIONS Average Lifetimes for Energy-Related Capital Stock *IEA (2000), World Energy Outlook 2000, p. 43 THE PETULA CLARK POSTULATE 10 Environments for Aging 2010 | March 23, 2010 ©2010 Morrison Kattman Menze, Inc.
    • IMPLICATIONS THE PETULA CLARK POSTULATE 11 Environments for Aging 2010 | March 23, 2010 ©2010 Morrison Kattman Menze, Inc.
    • BRAIN DRAIN “Only by understanding the rise of this [creative] class and its values can we begin to understand the sweeping and seemingly disjointed changes in our society and begin to shape our future more intelligently.” Richard Florida The Rise of the Creative Class, p. xxvii © 2008 Richard Florida THE PETULA CLARK POSTULATE 12 Environments for Aging 2010 | March 23, 2010 ©2010 Morrison Kattman Menze, Inc.
    • BRAIN DRAIN “Maybe it’s the Indiana attitude. I’ve never been anywhere that is so risk-adverse. A lot of parents just don’t value education, and they’ve passed that on to their kids. There's a lack of leadership. Indiana people seem to be content to be mediocre people living in mediocre cities.” -Richard Longworth Caught in the Middle, p48 Economic Incentives for Education in Indiana $20,000 $15,000 $17,470 $15,000 $10,000 $12,700 $8,490 $5,000 $6,700 $7,200 $0 Indiana US Average Average of Top 10 States Additional Earnings w/Associates Additional Earnings w/Bachelors Difference in Median Annual Earning Between College Graduates and High School Graduates in Indiana vs. the U.S. and the Top 10 States (18-64 Year Olds) for 2000. THE PETULACensus Bureau, 2000 Census 5% Public Use Microdata Samples. Source: U.S. CLARK POSTULATE 13 Environments for Aging 2010 | March 23, 2010 ©2010 Morrison Kattman Menze, Inc.
    • AGING MARKET Indiana Population Growth from 2005 to 2040: 15% for 65+ POPULATION THE PETULA CLARK POSTULATE Environments for Aging 2010 | March 23, 2010 90% 14 ©2010 Morrison Kattman Menze, Inc.
    • AGING MARKET SENIORS YP’s FAMILIES LOW INCOME “ When I retire I want to drink beer and work on my car all day long. I know I won’t be able to drive the damn thing, but that’s not the point. I have worked hard, and when I retire that’s what I want to do. So give me a garage, a fridge full of beer, and leave me alone. Sure… come in to change my diaper, make sure I have a pulse – but then let me get back to changing my carburetor… …and if you won’t do it, I will pay for someone else to; and if I cant find anyone I will find friends of mine and we will just build our own damn garage and hire 30 full time nurses. THE PETULA CLARK POSTULATE Environments for Aging 2010 | March 23, 2010 Dr. Lowell Catlett Columbus, Indiana 2007 ” Keynote Address AIA-IN+KY Convention 15 ©2010 Morrison Kattman Menze, Inc.
    • UNDERSTANDING “HOME” PERCENTAGE OF INDIANA RESIDENCES AGE 60+ WHO WANT TO STAY AT “HOME” Not Very Confident** 39% Disagree 5% Agree* Neither/ 94% Very DK/RF 1% Confident 61% We asked respondents whether they agree or disagree For people who answered “agree” we calculated the percentage of with the following statement: “What I’d really like to do is adults age 60+ who were very confident/not very confident that stay in my current residence for as long as possible.” they will be able to afford to live in their current residence for as long as they would like. Source: AdvantAge Initiative Community Survey in Indiana 2008 Note: Percentages may not add up to 100% due to rounding and/or missing information. *Agree includes those who said Strongly agree or Somewhat agree. **Not Very Confident includes those who said Somewhat confident, Not too confident, Not confident at all, Don’t know, or Refused. § Excludes Area 2 (Elkhart, Kosciusko, LaPorte, Marshall & St. Joseph Counties) which was surveyed in 2006. THE PETULA CLARK POSTULATE 16 Environments for Aging 2010 | March 23, 2010 ©2010 Morrison Kattman Menze, Inc.
    • UNDERSTANDING “HOME” UP, Pixar Films (2009) THE PETULA CLARK POSTULATE 17 Environments for Aging 2010 | March 23, 2010 ©2010 Morrison Kattman Menze, Inc.
    • UNDERSTANDING “HOME” “I long, as does every human “Home is not where you live, but being, to be home wherever I where they understand you.” find myself.” - Maya Angelou - Christian Morganstern “ Home is not merely about control, but about human agency, a sense that what you are doing in the world makes a difference that nobody else could make. “My home is not a place, it is people.” - Lois McMaster Bujold ” - Philip Stafford “There is a magic in that little world, home; it is a mystic circle that surrounds comforts and virtues never known beyond its hallowed limits.” - Robert Southey “The home is the center and circumference, the start and the “Home is a place where you grow up wanting finish, of most of our lives.” to leave, and grow old wanting to get back to.” - Charlotte Perkins Gilman - John Ed Pearce THE PETULA CLARK POSTULATE 18 Environments for Aging 2010 | March 23, 2010 ©2010 Morrison Kattman Menze, Inc.
    • SOCIAL NETWORK “ A NORC (Naturally Occurring Retirement Community) is the opposite of a planned retirement community. A NORC could be a community, neighborhood, building or whatever real estate subset you choose, that evolves, well, naturally. For example, say you live in a condominium building on the North Side of Chicago. It just happens that most of the residents are older people. In most cases, the residents didn't move there old, they just got older along with the building. That's a NORC. ” David Gest, 'Naturally Occurring Retirement Communities' In First Suburbs,” (2006) Charles Street, Beacon Hill, Boston, MA Photo by MKM, 2009. THE PETULA CLARK POSTULATE 19 Environments for Aging 2010 | March 23, 2010 ©2010 Morrison Kattman Menze, Inc.
    • SOCIAL NETWORK 84.0% participate in more activities then they used to 95.4% know more about their community’s services than they used to 70.5% feel healthier and more SOCIAL INTERACTION Surveys show that more than 88% active than they used to of NORC residents talk with more people than they used to. THE PETULA CLARK POSTULATE 20 Environments for Aging 2010 | March 23, 2010 ©2010 Morrison Kattman Menze, Inc.
    • AGING MARKET WORK/RETIRE BIRTH OCCUPATIONAL DURATION DEATH RATIO 0 AGRARIAN 16 70 72 27:1 0 INDUSTRIAL 18 65 75 5:1 0 21 62 82 INFORMATION 2:1 0 25 55 85 FUTURE 1:1 50%+ WORKING RETIREMENT THE PETULA CLARK POSTULATE 21 Environments for Aging 2010 | March 23, 2010 ©2010 Morrison Kattman Menze, Inc.
    • PART PLACE QUALITY OF TWO 1 WHAT’S GOING ON??? WHAT’S THERE??? The vibrancy of street life, café culture, The combination of the built arts, music and people engaging in environment and the natural outdoor activities – altogether a lot of environment; a proper setting for active, exciting, creative endeavors. MODERN pursuit of creative lives. METRIC 3 2 WHO’S THERE??? The diverse kinds of people, interacting and providing cues that anyone can plug into and THE PETULA CLARK POSTULATE make a like in a community. 22 Environments for Aging 2010 | March 23, 2010 ©2010 Morrison Kattman Menze, Inc.
    • RENEWAL 1. VITALITY: How “healthy” is your city and the overall health of your residents? 2. EARNING: How is your city’s future job growth, the percentage of jobs in the knowledge-based sector, household incomes, etc.? 3. LEARNING: How committed is your city to high quality education for all of its citizens? 4. SOCIAL CAPITAL: How open, safe, and accessible is your city to all people? 5. COST OF LIFESTYLE: How competitive is your cost of living? 6. AFTER HOURS: How are the places to go and things to do after work and on weekends? 7. AROUND TOWN: How easy is it to get to where you want to go in your city (e.g. walkability, airport activity, commute times, mass transit opportunities, etc.)? “Attracting and Retaining Talent to Greater Akron: Research, Report, and Recommended Actions,” by Next Generation Consulting, August 2005. THE PETULA CLARK POSTULATE 23 Environments for Aging 2010 | March 23, 2010 ©2010 Morrison Kattman Menze, Inc.
    • DOWNTOWN RENEWAL 31 TARGET CITIES POPULATION= 10-25,000 PEOPLE “ Creative people seek places that are themselves a challenge and where they can help craft the future. ” 10 They want a place that’s not done. Richard Florida, The Rise of The Creative Class, p232. THE PETULA CLARK POSTULATE 24 Environments for Aging 2010 | March 23, 2010 ©2010 Morrison Kattman Menze, Inc.
    • DOWNTOWN RENEWAL HOW MIDWESTERN SMALL TOWNS COMPARE TO NATIONAL AVERAGE 124% 112% 100% 99% 93% 89% 85% 81% 79% 75% 67% 68% % With Age 65+ Mean Commute Time Median Household Income Single-Family Median Home Value U.S. Average Indiana Average Target City Average Kendallville Source: 2007 U. S. Census Data THE PETULA CLARK POSTULATE 25 Environments for Aging 2010 | March 23, 2010 ©2010 Morrison Kattman Menze, Inc.
    • WALKABILITY THE VALUE OF WALKABILITY = $$ THE PETULA CLARK POSTULATE 26 Environments for Aging 2010 | March 23, 2010 ©2010 Morrison Kattman Menze, Inc.
    • TARGET CITIES WALKABILITY 90.0 80.0 70.0 76.3 78.7 WWW.WALKSCORE.COM 60.0 72.0 The Walk Score algorithm looks at destinations in 13 50.0 categories and awards points for each destination that 54.0 40.0 49.3 is between one-quarter mile and one mile of the 42.7 30.0 subject residential property: 33.6 20.0 29.4 •Grocery Stores •Libraries 18.0 10.0 •Restaurants •Bookstores 0.0 •Coffee shops •Fitness Downtown WalkScore CCRC WalkScore Average Yield •Bars •Drug Stores •Movie Theaters •Hardware Stores Indiana Average Target City Average Kendallville Average •Schools •Clothing Stores •Parks •Music Stores 70+= SCORECARD: 90–100 = Walkers' Paradise: Most errands can be accomplished on foot and many people get by without owning a car. 70–89 = Very Walkable: It's possible to get by without owning a car. 50–69 = Somewhat Walkable: Some stores and amenities are within walking distance, but many everyday trips still require a bike, public transportation, or car. 25–49 = Car-Dependent: Only a few destinations are within easy walking range. For most errands, driving or public transportation is a must. 0–24 = Car-Dependent (Driving Only): Virtually no neighborhood destinations within walking range. You can walk from your house to your car! THE PETULA CLARK POSTULATE 27 Environments for Aging 2010 | March 23, 2010 ©2010 Morrison Kattman Menze, Inc.
    • NETWORK MAPPING 11 12 3 ½ MILE RADIUS 1 MILE RADIUS 4 10 1 2 5 9 3 6 8 7 1. State Highway 5. Middle School 9. City Park + Beach Kendallville, Indiana 2. Golf Course 6. YMCA 10.Library 3. Public Lake 7. High School 11.County Fairgrounds 4. Walkable Downtown 8. Sports Field(s) 12.Industrial Park THE PETULA CLARK POSTULATE 28 Environments for Aging 2010 | March 23, 2010 ©2010 Morrison Kattman Menze, Inc.
    • NETWORK SCALE THE PETULA CLARK POSTULATE 29 Environments for Aging 2010 | March 23, 2010 ©2010 Morrison Kattman Menze, Inc.
    • DEMAND “ People are being drawn to the convenience and culture of walkable urban neighborhoods across the country – even when those neighborhoods are small. ” Christopher Leinberger The Option of Urbanism (2007) 28% 60% “URBAN” RETIREMENT RELOCATION Studies have demonstrated that 28% of Studies have found 60% of baby boomers baby boomers plan to or are intrigued expect/plan to move and make a lifestyle by retiring in an urban, walkable adjustment in their 60’s. environment. 30% 36% WALKABLITY MARKET CATCHMENT A 2008 AARP poll found that almost 1/3 Of the 60% planning to relocate for of Americans age 50+ wanted to walk retirement, 36% will move more than more to services and entertainment. three hours away. THE PETULA CLARK POSTULATE 30 Environments for Aging 2010 | March 23, 2010 ©2010 Morrison Kattman Menze, Inc.
    • CCRC TRENDING TOP FIVE TRENDS IN CCRC PROGRAMS: PROJECTED GROWTH FROM 2008-2013 100.0% 90.0% 91.4% 93.6% 89.1% 80.0% 70.0% 66.7% 65.2% 60.0% 59.6% 50.0% 40.0% 44.7% 43.5% 30.0% 20.0% 21.4% 23.9% 10.0% 0.0% Web-Based Wellness Programs Lifelong Learning Wellness Programs Computer Training Education for for Residents Programs for Staff for Residents Residents % <300 Units Currently Offering % <300 Units Offering by 2013 Source: Susan Brecht, Sandra Fein, and Linda Hollinger-Smith, “Preparing for the Future: Trends in Continuing Care Retirement Communities.” Seniors Housing & Care Journal, 2009, Vol. 17, No. 1, p75-90 THE PETULA CLARK POSTULATE 31 Environments for Aging 2010 | March 23, 2010 ©2010 Morrison Kattman Menze, Inc.
    • PART THREE SOCIAL CATALYST volunteerism arts transit education Percentage of People Age 65+ Reporting Good-Excellent Health 90% 80% 70% 80% 76% 74% 60% 68% 67% 50% 60% 63% 63% 57% 57% 40% 30% 54% 47% aging 20% 10% 0% retail 65+ 65-74 75-84 85+ small White Black Hispanic business Source: "Older Americans 2008 Key Indicators of Well-Being", Federal healthcare THE PETULA Forum onPOSTULATE Statics Interagency CLARK Aging Related 32 Environments for Aging 2010 | March 23, 2010 ©2010 Morrison Kattman Menze, Inc.
    • SMART GROWTH Age Qualified Neighborhood Amenities… In-Home Services: Members will have access to various care services ranging in a levels of need. Available services include assistance with activities of daily living (ADL’s), personal care, licensed home health, cooking, cleaning, light housekeeping MENU Home Inspection and/or Repairs: Members will have access to accessing home repair services and annual “safety inspections” for their homes to ensure quality living arrangements. and select errands. Transportation: Members will have access to limited public transportation as well as ability to reserve and utilize a Care Coordination: Members will be assigned a Personal Care member-only rental car service. Coordinator for their respective services and needs and be available to you and your family 24/7. Social and Wellness Programs: Members will have access to exercise classes, arts and crafts classes, wellness seminars, Adult Day Care: Members will be offered services provided in a speakers, day excursions and discounted use of local YMCA. congregate setting for a scheduled number of hours per week, including transportation, meals and activities. Work/Live: Members will have access to available office space and consultation services in a work-sharing environment with a local Meals: Members will have access to delivery services and/or incubator. voucher-meals from local qualifying restaurants. THE PETULA CLARK POSTULATE 33 Environments for Aging 2010 | March 23, 2010 ©2010 Morrison Kattman Menze, Inc.
    • CAFÉ-CENTRIC RETAIL AS SOCIAL HUB FOR LOCAL SENIORS THE PETULA CLARK POSTULATE 34 Environments for Aging 2010 | March 23, 2010 ©2010 Morrison Kattman Menze, Inc.
    • RETAIL SERVICES SENIORS AS CRITICAL MASS FOR LOCAL BUSINESSES + = THE PETULA CLARK POSTULATE 35 Environments for Aging 2010 | March 23, 2010 ©2010 Morrison Kattman Menze, Inc.
    • RETAIL SERVICES SENIORS AS CRITICAL MASS FOR LOCAL BUSINESSES Percentage of Indiana Residents Age 60+ Who Attended movies, sports events, or group events in the Last Week… 67% Source: AdvantAge Initiative Community Survey in Indiana 2008 THE PETULA CLARK POSTULATE 36 Environments for Aging 2010 | March 23, 2010 ©2010 Morrison Kattman Menze, Inc.
    • RETAIL SERVICES SENIORS AS CRITICAL MASS FOR LOCAL FESTIVALS Percentage of Indiana Residents Age 60+ Who Engaged in at Least one Social, Religious or Cultural Activity in the Last Week… 88% Source: AdvantAge Initiative Community Survey in Indiana 2008 Downtown Kendallville Apple Festival 2009 THE PETULA CLARK POSTULATE 37 Environments for Aging 2010 | March 23, 2010 ©2010 Morrison Kattman Menze, Inc.
    • SMALL BUSINESS SENIORS AS KNOWLEDGE RESOURCE FOR EMERGING PROFESSIONALS + = THE PETULA CLARK POSTULATE 38 Environments for Aging 2010 | March 23, 2010 ©2010 Morrison Kattman Menze, Inc.
    • SMALL BUSINESS COWORKING Percentage of Indiana Residents Age 60+ Who Would Like to Work for Pay Working Full Time Working Part Time Would Like to Work for 45% Pay (but currently are not) Would Not Like to Work for Pay THE PETULA CLARK POSTULATE 39 Environments for Aging 2010 | March 23, 2010 ©2010 Morrison Kattman Menze, Inc.
    • EDUCATION SENIORS AS EDUCATORS FOR LOCAL YOUTH + = THE PETULA CLARK POSTULATE 40 Environments for Aging 2010 | March 23, 2010 ©2010 Morrison Kattman Menze, Inc.
    • TRANSPORTATION SENIORS AS MOTIVATION FOR TRANSIT + = THE PETULA CLARK POSTULATE 41 Environments for Aging 2010 | March 23, 2010 ©2010 Morrison Kattman Menze, Inc.
    • TRANSPORTATION SENIORS AS MOTIVATION FOR TRANSIT PASSENGER RAIL TRANSIT DIAMOND STREET EAST LISLE STREET THE PETULA CLARK POSTULATE 42 Environments for Aging 2010 | March 23, 2010 ©2010 Morrison Kattman Menze, Inc.
    • TRANSPORTATION SENIORS AS MOTIVATION FOR TRANSIT Annual Total Riders Per Age Group Annual Total Trips Per Age Group 800 35,000 700 30,000 600 25,000 500 20,000 400 15,000 300 10,000 200 100 5,000 0 0 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 Senior (60+) Adult (18-59) Student (K-12) Infant (0-5) Senior (60+) Adult (18-59) Student (K-12) Infant (0-5) THE PETULA CLARK POSTULATE Source: WOW! User Data, Provided43 by Environments for Aging 2010 | March 23, 2010 ©2010 Morrison Kattman Menze, Inc. Wells Council on Aging, March 2009.
    • EXISTING DOWNTOWN 1 3 2 4 5 6 Typical Problems with Failing Downtowns… 1. Empty Storefronts: Failing downtowns commonly have a series 4. Local Icons: Even in failing downtowns, many smaller of empty but architecturally interesting storefronts. communities still have local icons within their urban fabric. These landmarks must be revitalized whenever possible. 2. Underutilized Parking: In effort to compete with suburban retail, many downtowns made an effort to increase the 5. Suburban Development: Urban villages are defined by availability of closely adjacent parking much of which sits empty. building’s proximity to the sidewalk. Suburban development can counteract this experience with large setbacks. 3. Excessively Wide Streets: Widened streets present wonderful opportunities to recreate existing streetscapes. 6. Abandoned Structures: Abandoned structures can be repurposed to create interesting, innovative “brand” for the local community. THE PETULA CLARK POSTULATE 44 Environments for Aging 2010 | March 23, 2010 ©2010 Morrison Kattman Menze, Inc.
    • IMPLEMENTATION Cafe. + Community Center Senior Housing 1 1. Café + Community Center: Utilize an empty building to house a Mather’s Café-inspired community center to serve as a base for the proposed menu of services. Additionally, empty apartments above can be used for mixed-use independent living located directly on Main Street and existing homes within the service boundary could be marketed for In-Home Services. THE PETULA CLARK POSTULATE 45 Environments for Aging 2010 | March 23, 2010 ©2010 Morrison Kattman Menze, Inc.
    • IMPLEMENTATION Cafe. + Community Senior Housing 1 1. Café + Community Center: Utilize an empty building to house a Mather’s Café-inspired community center to serve as a base for the proposed menu of services. Additionally, empty apartments above can be used for mixed-use independent living located directly on Main Street and existing homes within the service boundary could be marketed for In-Home Services. THE PETULA CLARK POSTULATE 46 Environments for Aging 2010 | March 23, 2010 ©2010 Morrison Kattman Menze, Inc.
    • IMPLEMENTATION 2 2. Independent Living Units: New Independent Living row houses would be constructed directly behind Main Street as a urban transition between Main Street and the adjacent detached housing. THE PETULA CLARK POSTULATE 47 Environments for Aging 2010 | March 23, 2010 ©2010 Morrison Kattman Menze, Inc.
    • IMPLEMENTATION 2 2. Independent Living Units: New Independent Living row houses would be constructed directly behind Main Street as a urban transition between Main Street and the adjacent detached housing. THE PETULA CLARK POSTULATE 48 Environments for Aging 2010 | March 23, 2010 ©2010 Morrison Kattman Menze, Inc.
    • IMPLEMENTATION 3 3. Revitalized Main Street: A boulevard would be introduced to Main Street to accommodate trolley cars and a more human scale. Bike lanes, off-street parking, and outdoor dining would begin to create a more vibrant and interactive streetscape. THE PETULA CLARK POSTULATE 49 Environments for Aging 2010 | March 23, 2010 ©2010 Morrison Kattman Menze, Inc.
    • IMPLEMENTATION 3 3. Revitalized Main Street: A boulevard would be introduced to Main Street to accommodate trolley cars and a more human scale. Bike lanes, off-street parking, and outdoor dining would begin to create a more vibrant and interactive streetscape. THE PETULA CLARK POSTULATE 50 Environments for Aging 2010 | March 23, 2010 ©2010 Morrison Kattman Menze, Inc.
    • IMPLEMENTATION 4 4 4. Abandoned + Repurposed Structures : Utilize abandoned structures to begin to house marketable community amenities. Here a failing car dealership will be repurposed for a Zip Car lot and an abandoned gas station will be used to house a farmer’s market. THE PETULA CLARK POSTULATE 51 Environments for Aging 2010 | March 23, 2010 ©2010 Morrison Kattman Menze, Inc.
    • IMPLEMENTATION 4 4 4. Abandoned + Repurposed Structures : Utilize abandoned structures to begin to house marketable community amenities. Here a failing car dealership will be repurposed for a Zip Car lot and an abandoned gas station will be used to house a farmer’s market. THE PETULA CLARK POSTULATE 52 Environments for Aging 2010 | March 23, 2010 ©2010 Morrison Kattman Menze, Inc.
    • PROGRAM Apartments One-bedroom One-bedroom deluxe Two-bedroom Two-bedroom deluxe Commons Space 32 total units 12 @ 12 @ 6@ 2@ 650 sf = 775 sf = 900 sf = 1100 sf = 7,800 sf 9,300 sf 5,400 sf 2,200 sf 24,700 sf 5,220 sf Lobby and lounge 1@ 500 sf = 500 sf Dining (per seat) 48 @ 40 sf = 1,920 sf Conference/private dining 1@ 250 sf = 250 sf Activity room 1@ 1000 sf = 1,000 sf Parlor/library/technology room 2@ 400 sf = 800 sf Hair salon 1@ 200 sf = 200 sf Spa/tub room 1@ 250 sf = 250 sf Resident laundry room 2@ 150 sf = 300 sf Support Spaces 4,415 sf Staff office 2@ 150 sf = 300 sf Kitchen 1@ 1800 sf = 1,800 sf Dietary receiving, support 1@ 250 sf = 250 sf Clean supply 2@ 120 sf = 240 sf Soiled holding and trash 2@ 120 sf = 240 sf Housekeeping closet 1@ 40 sf = 40 sf Storage 2@ 200 sf = 400 sf Common toilet 2@ 220 sf = 440 sf Private toilets 3@ 45 sf = 135 sf Mechanical 3@ 150 sf = 450 sf Electrical and systems 1@ 120 sf = 120 sf Net-to-gross (per floor) 25% @ 34,335 sf = 8,584 sf Total independent living apartment building 42,919 sf Site development General earthwork 1 ls @ $ 100,000 = $ 100,000 Storm-water detention, underground piping, etc. 1 ls @ $ 75,000 = $ 75,000 Parking, roads and walkways 1 ls @ $ 150,000 = $ 150,000 Lawns, landscape, softscape, hardscape 1 ls @ $ 75,000 = $ 75,000 Site lighting, etc. 1 ls @ $ 50,000 = $ 50,000 Cost projection Building 42,919 sf @ $ 120 / sf = $ 5,150,250 Site development 1 ls @ $ 450,000 = $ 450,000 Food service equipment 1 ls @ $ 160,000 = $ 160,000 Dining furniture 48 @ $ 250 = $ 12,000 Misc. furniture and equipment 1@ $ 40,000 = $ 40,000 Low voltage systems and equipment 1@ $ 25,000 = $ 25,000 Cost of financing, debt service, interest, insurance (not included) Soft costs 10% @ $5,812,250 = $ 581,225 Total construction budget (no contingency) $ 6,418,475 THE PETULA CLARK POSTULATE 53 Environments for Aging 2010 | March 23, 2010 ©2010 Morrison Kattman Menze, Inc.
    • PROGRAM Support Spaces PROGRAM COMPARISON Common Space Cottages (12 Units) Apartments (32 units) 0 5,000 10,000 15,000 20,000 25,000 30,000 Urban Suburban COST COMPARISON Soft Costs FFE Site Devleopment Cottages (12 units) Apartments (32 units) $0 $1 $2 $3 $4 $5 $6 Urban Suburban SAVINGS = $3.75 million 40+% REDUCTION IN COST THE PETULA CLARK POSTULATE 54 Environments for Aging 2010 | March 23, 2010 ©2010 Morrison Kattman Menze, Inc.
    • PROGRAM THIRD-PARTY RESPONSIBILITIES Community Center and Café* Partnering with local café owner, the Kendallville Area Chamber of Commerce, and the Noble County Council on Aging to create a community center for menu of services and activities. Food Services and Dining Partnering with local restaurant owners, the Kendallville Area Chamber of Commerce, and the Kendallville Main Street Association to setup of a voucher program for local members. Common Space Partnering with local cultural amenities such as the adjacent stores, library, VFW, and YMCA. Activity Space Partnering with local Economic Development Corporation and Vocational Programs to create opportunities for education, skilled labor instruction, consultation, and co-working. Public Transit Partnering with the City of Kendallville and the Noble County Council on Aging to provide various options for transportation (e.g. Zip Car, public Trolley, etc.). Home Maintenance Partnering with NeighborLink to encourage local youth and community organizations to assist seniors in the errands as well as the maintenance and care for their homes. *The installation of the Café is currently estimated to include 5,700+/- sq. ft. of renovated space within an existing building downtown with a preliminary budget of $580,000. THE PETULA CLARK POSTULATE 55 Environments for Aging 2010 | March 23, 2010 ©2010 Morrison Kattman Menze, Inc.
    • AUDIENCE THE PETULA CLARK POSTULATE 56 Environments for Aging 2010 | March 23, 2010 ©2010 Morrison Kattman Menze, Inc.
    • RESOURCES Bachelard, Gaston, The Poetics of Space: The Classic Look at How We Experience Intimate Places. Boston: Beacon Press, 1969. Calthorpe, Peter, The Next American Metropolis: Ecology, Community, and the American Dream. New York: Princeton Architectural Press, 1993. Duany, Andres; Elizabeth Plater-Zyberk and Jeff Speck, Suburban Nation: the Rise of Sprawl and the Decline of the American Dream. New York: North Point Press, 2000. Foucault, Michel, Of Other Spaces, 1967. Florida, Richard, The Rise of the Creative Class. New York: Basic Books, 2004. Gladwell, Malcolm, Outliers: The Story of Success. New York: Little, Brown and Company, 2008. Jacobs, Jane, The Death and Life of Great American Cities. New York: Modern Library, 1993. Kretzmann, John P. and John L. McKnight, Building Communities From the Inside Out: A Path Toward Finding and Mobilizing a Community's Assets. Chicago: ACTA Publication, 1993. Kunstler, James Howard, Geography of Nowhere: The Rise and Decline of America’s Man-Made Landscape. New York: Simon & Schuster, 1993. Longworth, Richard C., Caught in the Middle: America’s Heartland in the Age of Globalism. New York: Bloomsbury, 2008 Putman, Robert, Bowling Alone: The Collapse and Revival of American Community. New York: Simon & Schuster, 2000. Rowe, John W. and Robert L. Kahn, Successful Aging. New York: Random House, 1999. Stafford, Phillip, Elderburbia: Aging with a Sense of Place in America. Santa Barbra: ABC-CLIO, LLC, 2009 Sucher, David, City Comforts: How to Build an Urban Village. Seattle: City Comforts Inc., 2003. Whyte, William, Social Life in Small Urban Spaces. [video] New York, NY: Municipal Art Society of New York, 1979. THE PETULA CLARK POSTULATE 57 Environments for Aging 2010 | March 23, 2010 ©2010 Morrison Kattman Menze, Inc.