Survival Strategies for Managers

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Lessons from Sparring Strategies of Successful Fighters - Applied to Management

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  • Be unpredictableHow?Develop a repertoire of stylesShift between stylesBelbin’s modelMirror the opponent’s styleNature thrives on mimicryImitation is the sincerest form of flattery.Observe. Imitate.[He whines. You sympathize.She is enthusiastic. You stoke her passion.He is passive. You wait.She is aggressive. You assert.]One-trick pony – live point to pointLive meeting to meeting.
  • What is style?
  • Belbin’s styles – Team Roles
  • A good leader is someone who prefers to cooperate but is also a skilled competitor. A good leader is a nice, tough, forgiving, and clear person:Nice – The good leader knows the benefits of cooperation in forming alliances. They are appreciative, positive thinkers that are confident and flexible.Tough – They know when to compete. They aren’t left behind; they are capable of out doing others through competitive action. They are both confident and courageous.Forgiving – The good leader knows when it is necessary to smooth over awkward or rough patches to get back to business. They are confident, compassionate, and fair.Clear – The good leader knows that the best outcome for all is cooperation. They are clear about this and as a consequence so are others. They are confident, fair and honest leaders.
  • The most visible, powerful, and, arguably, effective non-governmental executive in the America of World War II and the years thereafter was not a businessman. It was Francis Cardinal Spellman, the head of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of New York and adviser to several U.S. presidents. When Spellman took over, the diocese was bankrupt and totally demoralized. It's successor inherited the leadership position in the American Catholic church. Spellman often said that during his waking hours he was alone only twice each day, for 25 minutes each time: when he said Mass in his private chapel after getting up in the morning and when he said his evening prayers before going to bed. Otherwise he was always with people in a meeting, starting at breakfast with one Catholic organization and ending at dinner with another.
  • The key to running an effective meeting is to decide in advance what kind of meeting it will be. Different kinds of meetings require different forms of preparation and different results: A meeting to prepare a statement, an announcement, or a press release. For this to be productive, one member has to prepare a draft beforehand. At the meeting’s end, a pre-appointed member has to take responsibility for disseminating the final text. A meeting to make an announcement—for example, an organizational change. This meeting should be confined to the announcement and a discussion about it. A meeting in which one member reports. Nothing but the report should he discussed. A meeting in which several or all members report. Either there should be no discussion at all or the discussion should be limited to questions for clarification. Alternatively, for each report there could be a short discussion in which all participants may ask questions. If this is the format, the reports should be distributed to all participants well before the meeting. At this kind of meeting, each report should be limited to a preset time—for example, 15 minutes. A meeting to inform the convening executive. The executive should listen and ask questions. He or she should sum up but not make a presentation. A meeting whose only function is to allow the participants to be in the executive’s presence. Cardinal Spellman’s breakfast and dinner meetings were of that kind. There is no way to make these meetings productive. They are the penalties of rank. Senior executives are effective to the extent to which they can prevent such meetings from encroaching on their workdays. Spellman, for instance, was effective in large part because he confined such meetings to breakfast and dinner and kept the rest of his working day free of them.
  • The key to running an effective meeting is to decide in advance what kind of meeting it will be. Different kinds of meetings require different forms of preparation and different results: A meeting to prepare a statement, an announcement, or a press release. For this to be productive, one member has to prepare a draft beforehand. At the meeting’s end, a pre-appointed member has to take responsibility for disseminating the final text. A meeting to make an announcement—for example, an organizational change. This meeting should be confined to the announcement and a discussion about it. A meeting in which one member reports. Nothing but the report should he discussed. A meeting in which several or all members report. Either there should be no discussion at all or the discussion should be limited to questions for clarification. Alternatively, for each report there could be a short discussion in which all participants may ask questions. If this is the format, the reports should be distributed to all participants well before the meeting. At this kind of meeting, each report should be limited to a preset time—for example, 15 minutes. A meeting to inform the convening executive. The executive should listen and ask questions. He or she should sum up but not make a presentation. A meeting whose only function is to allow the participants to be in the executive’s presence. Cardinal Spellman’s breakfast and dinner meetings were of that kind. There is no way to make these meetings productive. They are the penalties of rank. Senior executives are effective to the extent to which they can prevent such meetings from encroaching on their workdays. Spellman, for instance, was effective in large part because he confined such meetings to breakfast and dinner and kept the rest of his working day free of them.
  • The key to running an effective meeting is to decide in advance what kind of meeting it will be. Different kinds of meetings require different forms of preparation and different results: A meeting to prepare a statement, an announcement, or a press release. For this to be productive, one member has to prepare a draft beforehand. At the meeting’s end, a pre-appointed member has to take responsibility for disseminating the final text. A meeting to make an announcement—for example, an organizational change. This meeting should be confined to the announcement and a discussion about it. A meeting in which one member reports. Nothing but the report should he discussed. A meeting in which several or all members report. Either there should be no discussion at all or the discussion should be limited to questions for clarification. Alternatively, for each report there could be a short discussion in which all participants may ask questions. If this is the format, the reports should be distributed to all participants well before the meeting. At this kind of meeting, each report should be limited to a preset time—for example, 15 minutes. A meeting to inform the convening executive. The executive should listen and ask questions. He or she should sum up but not make a presentation. A meeting whose only function is to allow the participants to be in the executive’s presence. Cardinal Spellman’s breakfast and dinner meetings were of that kind. There is no way to make these meetings productive. They are the penalties of rank. Senior executives are effective to the extent to which they can prevent such meetings from encroaching on their workdays. Spellman, for instance, was effective in large part because he confined such meetings to breakfast and dinner and kept the rest of his working day free of them.
  • The key to running an effective meeting is to decide in advance what kind of meeting it will be. Different kinds of meetings require different forms of preparation and different results: A meeting to prepare a statement, an announcement, or a press release. For this to be productive, one member has to prepare a draft beforehand. At the meeting’s end, a pre-appointed member has to take responsibility for disseminating the final text. A meeting to make an announcement—for example, an organizational change. This meeting should be confined to the announcement and a discussion about it. A meeting in which one member reports. Nothing but the report should he discussed. A meeting in which several or all members report. Either there should be no discussion at all or the discussion should be limited to questions for clarification. Alternatively, for each report there could be a short discussion in which all participants may ask questions. If this is the format, the reports should be distributed to all participants well before the meeting. At this kind of meeting, each report should be limited to a preset time—for example, 15 minutes. A meeting to inform the convening executive. The executive should listen and ask questions. He or she should sum up but not make a presentation. A meeting whose only function is to allow the participants to be in the executive’s presence. Cardinal Spellman’s breakfast and dinner meetings were of that kind. There is no way to make these meetings productive. They are the penalties of rank. Senior executives are effective to the extent to which they can prevent such meetings from encroaching on their workdays. Spellman, for instance, was effective in large part because he confined such meetings to breakfast and dinner and kept the rest of his working day free of them.
  • The key to running an effective meeting is to decide in advance what kind of meeting it will be. Different kinds of meetings require different forms of preparation and different results: A meeting to prepare a statement, an announcement, or a press release. For this to be productive, one member has to prepare a draft beforehand. At the meeting’s end, a pre-appointed member has to take responsibility for disseminating the final text. A meeting to make an announcement—for example, an organizational change. This meeting should be confined to the announcement and a discussion about it. A meeting in which one member reports. Nothing but the report should he discussed. A meeting in which several or all members report. Either there should be no discussion at all or the discussion should be limited to questions for clarification. Alternatively, for each report there could be a short discussion in which all participants may ask questions. If this is the format, the reports should be distributed to all participants well before the meeting. At this kind of meeting, each report should be limited to a preset time—for example, 15 minutes. A meeting to inform the convening executive. The executive should listen and ask questions. He or she should sum up but not make a presentation. A meeting whose only function is to allow the participants to be in the executive’s presence. Cardinal Spellman’s breakfast and dinner meetings were of that kind. There is no way to make these meetings productive. They are the penalties of rank. Senior executives are effective to the extent to which they can prevent such meetings from encroaching on their workdays. Spellman, for instance, was effective in large part because he confined such meetings to breakfast and dinner and kept the rest of his working day free of them.
  • The key to running an effective meeting is to decide in advance what kind of meeting it will be. Different kinds of meetings require different forms of preparation and different results: A meeting to prepare a statement, an announcement, or a press release. For this to be productive, one member has to prepare a draft beforehand. At the meeting’s end, a pre-appointed member has to take responsibility for disseminating the final text. A meeting to make an announcement—for example, an organizational change. This meeting should be confined to the announcement and a discussion about it. A meeting in which one member reports. Nothing but the report should he discussed. A meeting in which several or all members report. Either there should be no discussion at all or the discussion should be limited to questions for clarification. Alternatively, for each report there could be a short discussion in which all participants may ask questions. If this is the format, the reports should be distributed to all participants well before the meeting. At this kind of meeting, each report should be limited to a preset time—for example, 15 minutes. A meeting to inform the convening executive. The executive should listen and ask questions. He or she should sum up but not make a presentation. A meeting whose only function is to allow the participants to be in the executive’s presence. Cardinal Spellman’s breakfast and dinner meetings were of that kind. There is no way to make these meetings productive. They are the penalties of rank. Senior executives are effective to the extent to which they can prevent such meetings from encroaching on their workdays. Spellman, for instance, was effective in large part because he confined such meetings to breakfast and dinner and kept the rest of his working day free of them.
  • Survival Strategies for Managers

    1. 1. SURVIVAL STRATEGIES FOR MANAGERS
    2. 2. Michael Porter
    3. 3. THIS IS STRATEGY Though we’ll cover that too, on other days in other places
    4. 4. THIS IS ABOUT DAILY WEAR AND TEAR
    5. 5. Anton ChekhovAny it isidiotcan this day-to-dayface livinga crisis that wears you out
    6. 6. LESSONS FROM
    7. 7. S SP TA RR AR TI EN GG Y
    8. 8. BE R A B E
    9. 9. A fighter with one styleis easy to figure outand vanquish
    10. 10. manager
    11. 11. WHAT IS STYLE?
    12. 12. THEY GOT STYLE
    13. 13. SHE GOT STYLE
    14. 14. WE GOT STYLE
    15. 15. TEAM WORKER LEADERSHIP STYLES BASED SOCIAL ACTION- ON BELBIN TEAM ROLES CEREBRAL ORIENTED
    16. 16. TEAM WORKERDISPLAY MORE THAN ONE STYLE
    17. 17. LEADER AS ..
    18. 18. Assurance ofmutual destructionparadoxicallyproduces peace
    19. 19. BE A good leader is someone who prefers to cooperate but is also a skilled competitor. Knows the benefits of cooperation in forming NICE alliances; Is appreciative and a positive thinker, confident and flexible. Knows when to compete and isn’t left behind; Is TOUGH capable of out-doing others through competitive action; Is both confident and courageous.FORGIVING Knows when it is necessary to smooth over awkward or rough patches to get back to business; Is confident, compassionate, and fair. CLEAR Knows that the best outcome for all is cooperation; Is clear about this and as a consequence so are others.
    20. 20. FORGIVING
    21. 21. CLEAR
    22. 22. Your fancy mid-air techniques and flying kicks don’t impress me.I am coming at you with my one knock-out punch until I get you.You are going down, punk!
    23. 23. Use onetechnique anduse it well.
    24. 24. WHAT ONE TECHNIQUE?
    25. 25. Francis Cardinal Spellman
    26. 26. Otherwise hewas alwayswith people ina meeting
    27. 27. EFFECTIVE MEETINGS
    28. 28. A meetingto prepare astatement,an announcement,or a pressrelease
    29. 29. A meetingto make anannouncement—for example, anorganizationalchange
    30. 30. A meeting inwhich onememberreports
    31. 31. A meetingin whichseveralor allmembersreport
    32. 32. A meetingto informthe conveningexecutive
    33. 33. A meetingwhose onlyfunction is toallow theparticipantsto be in theexecutive’spresence
    34. 34. PETER DRUCKERWhat Makes an Effective ExecutiveThe key to running an effective meeting is to decide in advance what kind of meeting it will be.Different kinds of meetings require different forms of preparation and different results:A meeting to prepare a statement, an announcement, or a press release. For this to beproductive, one member has to prepare a draft beforehand. At the meeting’s end, a pre-appointed memberhas to take responsibility for disseminating the final text.A meeting to make an announcement—for example, an organizational change. Thismeeting should be confined to the announcement and a discussion about it.A meeting in which one member reports. Nothing but the report should he discussed.A meeting in which several or all members report. Either there should be no discussion at all orthe discussion should be limited to questions for clarification. Alternatively, for each report there could be ashort discussion in which all participants may ask questions. If this is the format, the reports should bedistributed to all participants well before the meeting. At this kind of meeting, each report should be limitedto a preset time—for example, 15 minutes.A meeting to inform the convening executive. The executive should listen and ask questions. Heor she should sum up but not make a presentation.A meeting whose only function is to allow the participants to be in the executive’spresence. Cardinal Spellman’s breakfast and dinner meetings were of that kind. There is no way to makethese meetings productive. They are the penalties of rank. Senior executives are effective to the extent towhich they can prevent such meetings from encroaching on their workdays. Spellman, for instance, was effectivein large part because he confined such meetings to breakfast and dinner and kept the rest of his working day free of them.
    35. 35. THINKSTRATEGY
    36. 36. PROBLEM OF CHOICES
    37. 37. CHOICE OF PROBLEMS
    38. 38. Senior Manager MonsantoSanjay Bhatikar, PhD Bangalore, INDIA sanjay.bhatikar@gmail.com

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