Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Leveraging Stimulus Funds: Options for Financing 
Renewable Energy & Energy Efficiency Projects 
 
 
A REGBEE Committee Wh...
 


 
 
Foreword 
 
The Renewable Energy and Green Building and Energy Efficiency Working group (REGBEE) at ACORE felt 
th...
 


 

Table of Contents 
Linking Sustainability and the Focus on Funding with the New Administration .......................
 


Linking Sustainability and Financing in the New Administration 
With  the  passage  of  the  American  Recovery  and  ...
 


             electrical grid, 
            $4.5  billion  for  state  and  local  governments  to  increase  energy  ...
 


           The  organization  owns  the  Renewable  Energy  Certificates  (RECs)  generated  from  on‐site 
         ...
 


annual energy production and operational savings are greater than or equal to the required payments 
over the term of ...
 


Other Funding Sources 
In  an  attempt  to  fund  a  renewable  energy  and  energy  efficiency  project,  an  Energy ...
 


Monetizing the Attributes of Renewable Energy 
When an organization reduces its emissions of greenhouse gases through ...
 


Summary 
With the Obama Administration’s commitment to advancing renewable energy and energy efficiency by 
providing ...
 


RESOURCES 

3 Degrees Inc. http://www.3degreesinc.com. 
Church, Rob and Samantha Jacoby. 2009. “ACORE 20 GW Plan for K...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Leveraging Stimulus Funds: Options for Financing Renewable Energy & Energy Efficiency Projects

3,203

Published on

Linking Sustainability and Financing in the New Administration

0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
3,203
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
69
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Transcript of "Leveraging Stimulus Funds: Options for Financing Renewable Energy & Energy Efficiency Projects"

  1. 1. Leveraging Stimulus Funds: Options for Financing  Renewable Energy & Energy Efficiency Projects      A REGBEE Committee White Paper                                                                Prepared by Patrick Brandt and Jared Devine  Submitted by Tom Weirich 
  2. 2.       Foreword    The Renewable Energy and Green Building and Energy Efficiency Working group (REGBEE) at ACORE felt  that it was essential to educate building owners on funding options to implement sustainable measures.   Thanks to the diligent work of the Co‐Chairs, Jeffery Harris – Alliance to Save Energy, Brendan Owens –  United States Green Building Council, Larry Plumb – Verizon, and Tom Weirich – ACORE, the white paper  shares our knowledge on current funding opportunities available to assist in your efforts to reduce  energy consumption in your facilities.    Don Albinger  Judith Mouton    Johnson Controls, Inc.  Johnson Controls, Inc.  V.P. Renewable Energy Solutions  Renewable Education Manager        REGBEE Committee    The Renewable Energy Green Building & Energy Efficiency (REGBEE) Committee of the American Council  On Renewable Energy (ACORE) serves to accelerate sustainability practices, educate and communicate  with thought leaders, provide networks for project funding, and build connectivity to higher education.    The mission of the REGBEE Committee is to:     Accelerate sustainability pace of progress and triple bottom line: People, Profit, Planet   Educate and communicate RE/GB/EE opportunities and best practices with thought leaders  in the industry   Provide networks and knowledge of financial funding options to ensure successful project  acceptance   Create a solid linkage to the ACORE Education Committee to develop partnerships with  Higher Education Institution for the development of the next generation of energy  engineers   Upskilling of the existing technicians/engineers to meet the accelerating demand of the  Renewable Energy/Green Building/Energy Efficiency industry.    Further information can be found at www.acore.org      2
  3. 3.     Table of Contents  Linking Sustainability and the Focus on Funding with the New Administration .......................................... 4 What is funded in the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act? ......................................................... 4 Funding Options............................................................................................................................................ 5 Performance Contracting.......................................................................................................................... 5 Why Performance Contracting? ........................................................................................................... 5 How Does Performance Contracting Work?......................................................................................... 6 Equipment Leasing.................................................................................................................................... 6 Measurement and Verification ................................................................................................................. 7 Third‐party Ownership.............................................................................................................................. 7 Advantages and Disadvantages of Third‐Party Ownership .................................................................. 7 Financial Structure of Third Party Ownership....................................................................................... 7 Other Funding Sources.............................................................................................................................. 8 State Public Benefit Funds .................................................................................................................... 8 State Clean Energy Funds...................................................................................................................... 8 Utility Rebate Programs ........................................................................................................................ 8 Federal Incentives for Public Sector Organizations (REPI).................................................................... 8 Federal Investment Tax Credit.............................................................................................................. 8 Monetizing the Attributes of Renewable Energy.................................................................................. 9 Renewable Energy Certificates ............................................................................................................. 9 Energy Efficiency Certificates................................................................................................................ 9 Verified Emissions Reductions .............................................................................................................. 9 Summary ..................................................................................................................................................... 10   3
  4. 4.   Linking Sustainability and Financing in the New Administration  With  the  passage  of  the  American  Recovery  and  Reinvestment  Act  (ARRA)  of  2009,  achieving  sustainability  has  become  an  important  objective  for  both  public  and  private  sector  organizations  seeking lower energy costs, reliable energy supplies, and reduced greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions.  The  Obama Administration has taken a bold approach to establish new partnerships with schools, colleges  and universities, state and local governments, and businesses to double renewable energy production in  America over the next three years.  Already, these organizations have begun to adopt both renewable  energy  and  energy  efficiency  measures,  such  as  the  installation  of  solar  panels,  wind  turbines,  wood  boilers,  lighting  and  mechanical  (HVAC)  systems,  insulation,  and  window  replacement  to  offset  increasing fuel consumption.  In addition, they are accelerating their progress towards sustainability to  ensure their competitiveness and create long‐term sources of revenue, while providing local economic  rewards and protecting the environment.    With  renewable  energy  and  energy  efficiency  at  the  center  of  both  public  and  corporate  agendas,  questions  remain  about  how  projects  will  be  financed  and  what  incentives  will  be  provided  to  ensure  their feasibility.    There is a growing number of federal and state financial incentives, grants, and tax rebates to help offset  the up‐front costs of installation.  For instance, Performance Contracting and Third‐party Ownership are  some of the most common methods to secure financing, and other funding options include the use of  state  public  benefit  funds,  state  clean  energy  funds,  utility  rebate  programs,  federal  investment  tax  credits, and federal incentives.  With nearly $17 billion in ARRA funds available for direct spending, the  government is well‐positioned to finance renewable  energy and energy efficiency projects  despite the  current economic climate.  This paper  seeks to highlight  the  best practices for securing financing with  federal  stimulus  money  and  promoting  renewable  energy  and  energy  efficiency  in  the  most  cost‐ effective way.  What is included in the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act?  In  2009,  the  US  government  approved  the  American  Recovery  and  Reinvestment  Act  (ARRA)  to  help  stimulate the economy, and the bill contains many provisions relating to renewable energy and energy  efficiency projects, in the form of financial incentives as well as direct spending.  Approximately 90% of  ARRA spending will occur between the years 2009 and 2014.  ARRA funding for renewable energy and  energy efficiency includes:   $3.2 billion in energy efficiency and conservation block grants,   $6.3 billion for local and state governments to invest in energy efficiency programs,   $300 million to purchase energy efficient applications,   $250 million to increase energy efficiency in low‐income housing,   $4  billion  to  the  Department  of  Housing  and  Urban  Development  (HUD)  for  repairing  and  modernizing public housing,   $11 billion to create a “smart” grid,   $5 billion for weatherizing low‐income housing,   $4.5  billion  for  the  Office  of  Electricity  and  Energy  Reliability  to  modernize  the  nation's    4
  5. 5.   electrical grid,   $4.5  billion  for  state  and  local  governments  to  increase  energy  efficiency  in  federal  buildings,   $2.5 billion for energy efficiency research,   $3.2 billion toward Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grants,   $300 million to buy energy efficient appliances,   $300 million for state and local governments to purchase energy efficient vehicles, and   $250 million to increase energy efficiency in low‐income housing.    ARRA  illustrates  the  Obama  administration’s  commitment  to  advancing  renewable  energy  and  energy  efficiency  into  the  American  mainstream  with  a  substantial  amount  of  capital.    The  Committee  on  Appropriations  stated  that  the  “American  Recovery  and  Reinvestment  Bill  is  the  first  crucial  step  in  a  concerted effort to create and save 3 to 4 million jobs, jump start our economy, and begin the process of  transforming it for the 21st century.”  Funding Options  Most on‐site renewable energy and energy efficiency projects can be funded by ARRA with:   Performance  Contracting,  which  allows  organizations  to  fund  renewable  energy  facilities  with cost savings from energy efficiency measures through loan or lease mechanisms.   Third‐party Ownership, which provides organizations with the ability to enjoy some of the  benefits of renewable energy through service contracts while avoiding the risks associated  with direct ownership.  Performance Contracting  Performance  contracting  is  an  increasingly  popular  financial  model  that  enables  organizations  to  fund  energy  efficiency  and  renewable  energy  projects  in  the  absence  of  available  capital.    Many  public  organizations are unable raise sufficient capital to install on‐site renewable energy facilities without first  raising taxes or issuing bonds through referendums.  As a result, performance contracting has been an  especially attractive funding option for academic institutions and state and local governments, whereby  energy  and  operational  savings  accumulate  over  a  specified  time  period  and  are  used  to  fund  infrastructure improvements through a lease arrangement provided by third‐party financial institutions.   Why Performance Contracting?  The advantages associated with performance contracting include:   Guaranteed  energy  savings  enable  organizations  to  finance  up‐front  costs  of  energy  efficiency  measures  and  installation  of  on‐site  renewable  energy  facilities  in  the  manner  that best suits their financial needs.   All aspects of financing are performed by a qualified third‐party financial institution.   Energy  and  cost  savings  are  guaranteed.    (Otherwise,  the  contractor  is  required  to  reimburse the organization for the difference in cost.)    5
  6. 6.    The  organization  owns  the  Renewable  Energy  Certificates  (RECs)  generated  from  on‐site  renewable energy facilities and may sell credits on the open market.      An  Energy  Services  Company  (ESCO)  uses  performance  contracting  for  a  comprehensive  approach  by  analyzing  all  aspects  of  the  building  environment,  such  as—lighting,  HVAC,  and  water  efficiency—to  maximize the structure’s overall efficiency, savings, and greenhouse gas reductions.  This distinguishes  ESCOs from other contractors who typically focus on a single energy efficiency solution like lighting.  How Does Performance Contracting Work?  Although Performance Contracting is a complicated process, it can be divided into six simple steps:   1. A detailed investment‐grade sustainability audit is performed on the organization’s facilities  by a trained professional. The auditor identifies opportunities to improve energy efficiency  of  building  envelopes,  such  as  leaky  windows,  doors  and  wall  seams,  lighting,  heating,  ventilation, and air conditioning systems.  2. Results from the sustainability audit then undergo a technical review.  3. A performance contract is written following the technical review.  4. Once  the  contact  is  executed,  energy  efficiency  measures  can  then  be  performed  and  construction of the on‐site renewable energy facility can begin.  5. When the construction phase is completed, all new equipment from the renewable energy  facility  must  be  properly  operated  and  maintained  over  the  course  of  the  contract–which  can last between 10 and 20 years–to ensure that the projected energy production rates are  achieved.  6. Finally, cost savings are then recorded over the specified time period to ensure they equal  or exceed guaranteed cost savings agreed upon in the performance contract.  Equipment Leasing  Public sector organizations may be required to own new equipment and facilities, whereby traditional  loans or lease‐to‐own funding may be obtained from a financial institution. The following lease options  exist to benefit the particular needs of those organizations:   Capital  or  financed  lease  arrangements  allow  the  lessee  to  purchase  the  equipment  for  a  nominal fee at the end of the lease period.   Tax‐exempt  or  municipal  leases  exist  for  state  and  local  governments,  state  universities,  school districts, fire and police departments.   Operating  lease  arrangements  require  the  lessee  to  rent  equipment,  however,  provide  inexpensive and reliable energy at fair a market value.   Shared savings arrangements allow vendors to install the equipment at cost and receive a  negotiated percentage of the cost savings that the system generates.  The organization may  then purchase the equipment at fair market price.     When  using  the  performance  contracting  model  to  finance  energy  efficiency  projects,  the  risk  of  performance  belongs  entirely  to  the  Energy  Service  Company  (ESCO).    The  projects  are  designed  so    6
  7. 7.   annual energy production and operational savings are greater than or equal to the required payments  over the term of the contract, leaving a net neutral impact on a customer’s budget.   Measurement and Verification  The  primary  benefit  of  using  performance  contracting  as  a  procurement  tool  for  ARRA  is  that  it  often  provides  the  customer  with  an  annual  report  validating  energy  cost  savings.    The  transparency  of  this  approach is a critical requirement of the stimulus package; performance contracting programs provide  customers  with  the  annual  date  to  share  for  the  life  of  the  contract.    Measurement  and  verification  guarantees that projects are successfully managed and ensure a degree of oversight of funds.   Third‐party Ownership  As  an  alternative  to  performance  contracting,  third‐party  ownership  is  gaining  in  popularity.    Under  a  third‐party agreement, one organization permits another to install on‐site renewable energy facilities on  its property.  For instance, a company may enter into an agreement with a financial institution to install  solar  photovoltaic  panels  on  the  rooftop  of  its  buildings.    The  company  then  purchases  the  power  generated from the solar panels, but it does not own or maintain the panels themselves.  Advantages and Disadvantages of Third‐Party Ownership  While  third‐party  ownership  is  a  very  attractive  funding  option,  there  are  certain  disadvantages  when  choosing this type of funding:    Should electric rates fluctuate, an organization could find itself under contract to pay above‐ market electrical rates for a specified time period.   The  third  party  has  the  right  to  claim  it  is  using  power  produced  from  renewable  energy  sources.    This  is  especially  important  for  organizations  seeking  to  enhance  their  public  image.   Financial Structure of Third Party Ownership  Funding for installation of solar panels can come from three primary sources:  1. A grant from the local electric utility,  2. The sale of Renewable Energy Credits (RECs), and  3. Local investors.  Third‐party funding is popular in states where:   Peak electricity rates are relatively high,   State and utility incentives are available, and   There are pecial renewable energy incentives–such as higher REC prices for power produced  from solar photovoltaic cells.  In  this  model,  the  third‐party  is  responsible  for  installing,  operating,  and  maintaining  the  on‐site  renewable energy facility, which results in low operational risk for the power purchasing organization.   By negotiating a long‐term agreement to purchase power from a renewable energy facility –anywhere  between 6 and 25 years – an organization can secure a constant rate, should energy prices rise.  Even if  the  organization  (a  non‐profit)  is  tax‐exempt,  it  can  still  make  use  of  tax  incentives  to  install  on‐site  renewable energy facilities by partnering with a third‐party who would ultimately benefit from them.     7
  8. 8.   Other Funding Sources  In  an  attempt  to  fund  a  renewable  energy  and  energy  efficiency  project,  an  Energy  Service  Company  (ESCO)  can  obtain  capital  from  other  sources.    They  include:  state  public  benefit  funds,  state  clean  energy funds, utility rebate programs, federal investment tax credits, and federal incentives for public  organizations.   State Public Benefit Funds  These funds  are typically  financed through small surcharges on  consumers’ utility bills.  Twenty states  use  these  funds  to  provide  financial  support  for  renewable  energy  projects.    For  instance,  Vermont’s  Clean  Energy  Development  Fund  has  set  aside  approximately  $6  million  ‐  $7.2  million  annually  to  provide  financial  support  for  energy  efficiency  and  renewable‐energy  projects  through  March  2012.   Eligible  renewable  energy  projects  include  solar  PV,  solar  hot  water,  wind,  geothermal  heat  pumps,  farm, landfill, and sewer (methane) gas recovery.  State Clean Energy Funds  These  are  funds  that  state  governments  typically  set  aside  to  finance  large‐scale  renewable  energy  facilities. One example is the Kansas Energy Efficiency Program (KEEP) which provides up to 50% of the  total loan amount for a variety of home energy efficiency and energy conservation measures including  solar water, space heaters, and photovoltaics.  Utility Rebate Programs  Since renewable energy systems can sometimes delay construction of new generating capacity, reduce  peak  loads,  and  distribute  power  generation,  many  utilities  provide  financial  incentives  to  customers  who install them.  For example, the Modesto Irrigation District is a publicly‐owned utility that provides  light  and  water  in  California’s  Central  Valley.    Under  the  utility’s  Photovoltaic  Rebate  Program,  all  customers – commercial, residential, nonprofit, local government, state government, and agricultural –  can receive a rebate for installing solar PV systems.  The peak output capacity of a system must be 1 kW  or greater to participate.  The rebate is $2.80 per installed watt, not to exceed 50% of total project costs  up  to  30  kW.    Public  agencies  can  receive  an  additional  $0.50  per  watt,  bringing  their  incentive  up  to  $3.30 per watt up to 30 kW.  Federal Incentives for Public Sector Organizations (REPI)  The  Renewable  Energy  Production  Incentive  (REPI)  pays  1.5  cents  per  kWh  to  Tribal  Government,  Municipal  Utilities,  Rural  Electric  Cooperative,  and  State/local  governments  that  generate  electricity  from  solar  electric,  solar  thermal,  landfill  gas,  wind,  biomass,  geothermal,  livestock  methane,  tidal  energy, wave energy, ocean thermal, and fuel cells.  The organization is required to sell at least some of  the electricity generated to a utility or someone else.  Federal Investment Tax Credit  The federal investment tax credit (ITC) reduces federal income taxes for qualified tax‐paying owners  based on their capital investment in renewable energy projects.  It is a one time payment based on the  total investment the day the electric generating facility is placed in service.  For instance, homeowners  and businesses that generate power from wind, geothermal, biomass, hydropower, marine and  hydrokinetic, landfill gas and trash facilities, as well as, solar energy are eligible for a 30% federal tax  credit as approved by ARRA.      8
  9. 9.   Monetizing the Attributes of Renewable Energy  When an organization reduces its emissions of greenhouse gases through energy efficiency and  renewable energy projects, those reductions have financial value.  Companies, utilities, and  governments are willing to purchase emissions reductions to voluntarily offset their own emissions or to  satisfy government mandates.  Renewable Energy Certificates  Renewable  Energy  Certificates  (RECs)  represent  the  environmental  attributes  of  electricity  generated  from renewable resources and delivered to the power grid.  RECs represent the total emissions avoided– greenhouse  gases  and  pollutants–when  electricity  is  generated  from  renewable  resources  rather  than  fossil fuels.  For instance, when a municipality generates electricity from landfill gas (methane) and sells  it to a utility, the municipality earns one REC for every 1,000 kWh of power generated.  RECs can then be  sold  on  the  open  market  to  anyone  wishing  to  offset  their  consumption  of  electricity  produced  from  fossil fuels.   Energy Efficiency Certificates  Similar  to  RECs,  Energy  Efficiency  Certificates  (EECs)  are  earned  for  reductions  in  electricity  usage  through energy efficiency measures.  Each EEC represents 1,000 kWh of electricity savings.  The credits  are  created  when  an  organization  upgrades  equipment,  lighting,  and  energy  management  systems  or  operations, resulting in lower usage of electricity.  Three states – Connecticut, Pennsylvania, and Nevada  – incorporate energy efficiency into their renewable portfolio standard (RPS).  Several other states are  considering  adopting  similar  mandates.    EECs  are  then  purchased  on  the  open  market  by  companies  seeking to offset their greenhouse gas emissions.           Verified Emissions Reductions  Verified  Emissions  Reductions  (VER)  represent  reductions  in  CO2  emissions  resulting  from  renewable  energy or energy efficiency projects, as well as certain agricultural and forest management activities that  reduce  carbon  emissions.    They  are  measured  in  metric  tons  of  carbon‐equivalent  emissions  and  are  sold on open markets for carbon offsets alongside RECs. To maximize their market value, VERs should  meet certain minimum requirements which include:   Additionality:  the  underlying  project  was  in  addition  to  business‐as‐usual  and  would  not  have occurred if it didn’t generate VERs that could be sold to produce revenue.   Sustainability: renewable energy projects, in addition to reducing emissions, have a positive  impact on the sustainability of local communities are oftentimes preferred by VER buyers.   Reliability: VERs should be registered to ensure that they aren’t sold to multiple parties.                 9
  10. 10.   Summary  With the Obama Administration’s commitment to advancing renewable energy and energy efficiency by  providing a variety of tax credits, rebates, and other incentives, there has never been a better alignment  between  public  and  private  sector  interest  in  developing  clean  energy  projects.  ARRA  provides  legitimate funding options to help organizations implement renewable energy initiatives that are cost‐ effective.    Consequently,  lower  energy  costs  would  enable  them  to  improve  their  overall  services  and  competitiveness.    As  the  economy  gradually  improves  and  additional  stimulus  funds  are  released,  market confidence and liquidity will be restored, allowing more organizations to fund renewable energy  and energy efficiency projects.    10
  11. 11.   RESOURCES  3 Degrees Inc. http://www.3degreesinc.com.  Church, Rob and Samantha Jacoby. 2009. “ACORE 20 GW Plan for Kansas.” American Council on  Renewable Energy (ACORE).  DOE, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. http://www.eere.energy.gov.   Doris, Elizabeth. 2009. “State of States 2009: Renewable Energy Development and the Role of Policy.”  National Renewable Energy Laboratory.  DSIRE USA Database. http://www.dsireusa.org.  Energy Trust of Oregon. http://www.energytrust.org.  Environmental and Energy Study Institute. http://www.eesi.org.  Foundation for International Environmental Law and Development. http://www.cdmguide.net.  Information gathered by ACORE staff Erin Moore and Jeramy Shays  Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. http://www.ipcc.ch/ipccreports/ar4‐wg3.htm  New York State Public Service Commission. http://www.dps.state.ny.us.  Pollin, Robert, James Heintz, and Heidi Garret‐Peltier. 2009. “The Economic Benefits of Investing of  Clean Energy.” Center for American Progress.  Price, Derek. 2008. “Structuring the Deal: Funding Options and Financial Objectives for On‐Site  Renewable Energy Projects.” Johnson Controls.  REGBEE White Paper: Using Performance Contracting To Implement ARRA Projects." Thesis. Johnson  Controls, 2009.  TFS Green. http://www.tfsbrokers.com.  US Environmental Protection Agency. http://www.epa.gov.  Vermont Department of Public Service. http://publicservice.vermont.gov.      11

×