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  1. 1. Tindell  &  Bohlander,  2012   Pros   Cons   •  No,fiers  of  emergencies   •  Useful  as  dic,onaries  and   thesauruses  (when  these   resources  are  unavailable)   •  Data  collectors   •  Ringing  is  a  distrac,on   •  Distrac,on,  proven  to  deter   learning,  demonstrated   through  test  performance   between  those  who  used   cell  phones  in  class  and   those  who  didn’t   •  Used  for  chea,ng  during   tests/exams  
  2. 2. •  “About  40%  of…  students  indicated  that  they   used  their  cell  phones  during  class,  and  this   ac,vity  caused  a  distrac,on  for  about  85%  of   the  students.”   •  One  problem  stems  from  the  allowance  to  use   cell  phones  in  class  by  one  faculty  member,   and  another  member  reprimanding  students   for  doing  so.   Tindell  &  Bohlander,  2012  
  3. 3. •  91%  of  student  respondents  set  phones  to   vibrate  while  in  class   •  9%  of  respondents  shut  their  phones  off   •  97%  send  and  receive  messages  while  wai<ng   for  class  to  begin,  but  92%  of  respondents   stated  that  they  send  and  receive  texts  during   class  at  least  once  or  twice   – 30%  of  respondents  indicated  that  they  do  this   daily   •  97%  of  the  class  no,ce  others  doing  this  daily   Tindell  &  Bohlander,  2012  
  4. 4. •  “Students…  do  not  want  to  risk  a   confronta,on  with  the  [instructor],  and  so  are   less  likely  to  text  in  class  if  the  instructor  has  a   set  policy  and  seems  to  care  whether  the   students  are  tex,ng,  but  if  the  instructor  turns   his  or  her  back  to  the  class,  or  focuses  too   much  on  his  or  her  own  lecture,  students   indicate  that  it  is  easier  to  text  in  class.”     Tindell  &  Bohlander,  2012  
  5. 5. Tindell  &  Bohlander,  2012  
  6. 6. Other  sources  specified  the  following   informa4on.  
  7. 7. •  “…although  students  uniformly  believe  that   overt  prejudice  requires  interven<on,  they  may   perceive  incivili<es  such  as  checking  text   messages  as  none  of  the  teacher’s  concern.”   •  “…students  report  no<cing  incivili<es  such  as   side  conversa<ons,  cell  phone  use,  and   nonacademic  computer  use  more  frequently   than  teachers.”   Boysen,  2012  
  8. 8. •  “Students  perceived  ignoring  [incivili<es  in  the   classroom]  to  be  significantly  less  effec<ve   than  all  other  responses  across  all  types  of   incivility.”   •  “…most  students  want  teachers  to  take  swiA,   decisive  ac<on  in  pu^ng  an  end  to  incivility.     Thus,  rather  than  feeling  like  the  antagonist  of   one  student,  teachers  can  feel  like  they  are   ac<ng  with  the  support  of  the  rest  of  the   class.”   Boysen,  2012  
  9. 9. •  “…immediate  responses  are  advisable  when   incivility  is  interrup<ng  classroom  ac<vi<es.”   •  “Students  recognize  classroom  incivility  as   inappropriate  and  want  teachers  to  take  direct   ac<on  to  enforce  the  norm  of  classroom  order   and  decorum.”   •  Direct  and  private  confronta<on  were  the  two   most  prominent  methods  that  students   deemed  effec<ve  for  classroom  management,   based  on  their  responses.   Boysen,  2012  
  10. 10. References   Boysen,  B.  A.  (2012).  Teacher  responses  to  classroom  incivility:   Student  perceptions   of  effectiveness.  Teaching  of  Psychology,   39(4),  276-­‐279.   Tindell,  D.  R.,  &  Bohlander,  R.  W.  (2012).  The  use  and  abuse  of  cell   phones  and  text  messaging  in  the  classroom:  A  survey  of   college  students.  College  Teaching,  60(1),  1-­‐9.    

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