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An introduction to PBL. Slide presentation used during a workshop involving lecturers from Civil & Environmental Engineering, Universiti Tun Hussein Onn Malaysia. 4th & 5th September 2012.

An introduction to PBL. Slide presentation used during a workshop involving lecturers from Civil & Environmental Engineering, Universiti Tun Hussein Onn Malaysia. 4th & 5th September 2012.

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  • 1. PROBLEM BASED LEARNINGFACULTY OF CIVIL & ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING 4 & 5 September 2012 facilitator ZAINAL ABIDIN SAYADI Faculty of Science Technology & Human Development
  • 2. WORKSHOP AGENDA 1. Part 1: EXPERIENCING PBL 2. Part 2: INTRODUCTION TO PBL 3. Part 3: PBL LESSON DEVELOPMENT2
  • 3. What Would You DO?3
  • 4. Part 1: Experiencing PBL4
  • 5. Group Formation5
  • 6. Presentation6
  • 7. Reflection7
  • 8. Reflection  In a piece of paper, write on the following issues:  What did I learn in the previous activity?  What did I learn about my group members?8
  • 9. Working with Problem9
  • 10. http://bit.ly/problemdesign- fkaas10
  • 11. Problem 1: Bridge Construction11
  • 12. Problem 2: Highway Construction12
  • 13. Problem 3: Water Crisis13
  • 14. Problem 4: Building Construction14
  • 15. FILA Table15
  • 16. FACTS IDEAS LEARNING ACTION (GIVEN (HYPOTHESIS / ISSUES (WHAT SHOULD BE INFORMATION) OPINIONS) DONE) (WHAT ELSE DO I NEED TO KNOW)16
  • 17. Presentation & Reporting17
  • 18. Reflection18
  • 19. Assessment19
  • 20. End of Part 1: Experiencing PBL20
  • 21. Part 2: Introduction to PBL21
  • 22. What is PBL?  Watch this video  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dUD0KCnWne422
  • 23. INTRODUCTION TO PBL  “The amount of knowledge (in every field) is increasing and the rate at which it is increasing is accelerating. Students cannot learn all the material, but they can learn how to learn the material. This is an important step in helping students become self-directed learners. In problem-based learning students learn to be self-directed, independent and interdependent learners motivated to solve a problem” (Kiley, Mullins, Peterson and Rogers, 2000).23
  • 24. “The basic principle supporting the concept of PBL is older than formal education itself; namely, learning is initiated by a posed problem, query, or puzzle that the learner wants to solve” (Duch, Groh, & Allen, 2001).24
  • 25. INTRODUCTION TO PBL  What is Problem-based learning (PBL)?  What are the Characteristics of PBL?  What are the Individual Roles and Responsibilities?  What are the Group Roles?  What are the General Stages of PBL?  How are problems incorporated into a course?  What are characteristics of a good PBL problem?25
  • 26. What is Problem Based Learning (PBL)?  “A learning method based on the principle of using problems as a starting point for the acquisition and integration of new knowledge.” (Barrows, 1980).  “An innovative approach to learning in which „real world‟ problems serve as the stimulus for student learning.” (Stamford University, 1998).26
  • 27. What are the Characteristics of PBL?  Active, student-centered learning  Faculty act as facilitators  Problems form organizing focus and stimulus for learning  Problems are “ill-structured” and “complex”  Problem-solving occurs in groups  Authentic, performance-based assessment27
  • 28. What are the Individual Roles and Responsibilities?  Instructors  Facilitates, coaches, guides  Designs problems  Monitors student learning and group processes  Supports student learning  Manages group dynamics  Provides regular feedback  Students  Actively participate in learning process  Build knowledge  Work in teams28  Assume a group role
  • 29. What are the Group Roles?  Leaders  Recorder  Critic  Elaborator  Encourager  Facilitator29
  • 30. What are the General Stages of PBL? 1. Start with introductions, roles, responsibilities, and rules. 2. Present and initiate work on the problem. a. Determine objectives b. Assign tasks and roles c. Generate hypotheses d. Summarize and reflect e. Identify resources30
  • 31. What are the General Stages of PBL? 3. Self-directed learning 4. Summarize and evaluate a. Review and critique resources and information gathered b. Summarize and reassess problem c. Evaluate self, facilitator, and group member performances 5. Present solution(s)31
  • 32. The Process of PBL32
  • 33. Flow Chart of PBL Process33
  • 34. 34
  • 35. The Steps of PBL 1. Identify the problem 2. Explore the pre-existing knowledge 3. Generate hypothesis and possible mechanisms 4. Identify learning issues 5. Self study 6. Re-evaluation and application of new knowledge to the problem 7. Assessment and reflection of learning (Walsh A , 2005)35
  • 36. FACTS IDEAS LEARNING ACTION (GIVEN (HYPOTHESIS / ISSUES (WHAT SHOULD BE INFORMATION) OPINIONS) DONE) (WHAT ELSE DO I NEED TO KNOW)36
  • 37. How are problems incorporated into a course?  Identify a central idea, concept, or principle  Delineate learning outcomes for the problem  Brainstorm and then . . . outline an ill-structured, complex problem  Divide the problem into stages to allow for progressive disclosure  Develop a tutorial guide37
  • 38. What are characteristics of a good PBL problem?  Engages  Orients to the real-world  Generates multiple hypotheses  Requires team effort  Generates desired learning outcomes  Builds upon previous knowledge/experiences  Promotes development of higher order cognitive skills38
  • 39. Part 3: PBL Lesson Development39
  • 40. OUTCOME BASED EDUCATION  Learning outcomes are clearly spelled out.  Learning activities are designed to achieve the learning outcomes.  Clear assessment criteria40
  • 41. Learning Outcomes 1. Specific 2. Measurable 3. Achievable 4. Realistic 5. Time frame 6. Observable41
  • 42. Bloom‟s Taxonomy42
  • 43. Bloom‟s Taxonomy Can the student create new product or point of view? Can the student justify a stand or decision? Can the student distinguish between the different parts? Can the student use the information in a new way? Can the student explain ideas or concepts? Can the student recall or remember the information?43
  • 44. 44
  • 45. Psychomotor Domain45
  • 46. 46
  • 47. Student‟s Learning Time (PBL)  2 hours of F2F  + 2 to 3 hours for self learning  1 hour of presentation  + 3 to 4 hours for preparation  2000 words written report  Requires 10 – 12 hours to complete  1 hour of summative assessment  + 1 hour for preparation47
  • 48. PBL Lesson / Module Development Process  Determine the Learning Outcomes  Determine the End Product  Prepare Assessment Criteria  Identify Prior Knowledge to be Incorporated  Determine the Contents/Facts  Designed the Problem/Trigger  Anticipate student‟s response through FILA48
  • 49. FACTS IDEAS LEARNING ACTION (GIVEN (HYPOTHESIS / ISSUES (WHAT SHOULD BE INFORMATION) OPINIONS) DONE) (WHAT ELSE DO I NEED TO KNOW)49