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JDSU: Testing and Optimising LTE
JDSU: Testing and Optimising LTE
JDSU: Testing and Optimising LTE
JDSU: Testing and Optimising LTE
JDSU: Testing and Optimising LTE
JDSU: Testing and Optimising LTE
JDSU: Testing and Optimising LTE
JDSU: Testing and Optimising LTE
JDSU: Testing and Optimising LTE
JDSU: Testing and Optimising LTE
JDSU: Testing and Optimising LTE
JDSU: Testing and Optimising LTE
JDSU: Testing and Optimising LTE
JDSU: Testing and Optimising LTE
JDSU: Testing and Optimising LTE
JDSU: Testing and Optimising LTE
JDSU: Testing and Optimising LTE
JDSU: Testing and Optimising LTE
JDSU: Testing and Optimising LTE
JDSU: Testing and Optimising LTE
JDSU: Testing and Optimising LTE
JDSU: Testing and Optimising LTE
JDSU: Testing and Optimising LTE
JDSU: Testing and Optimising LTE
JDSU: Testing and Optimising LTE
JDSU: Testing and Optimising LTE
JDSU: Testing and Optimising LTE
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JDSU: Testing and Optimising LTE

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  • 1. Testing and Optimizing LTESome Lessons Learned so farS L L d f Rafael Andrade Solutions Architect
  • 2. Lessons Learned from 3G
  • 3. What did we learn from UMTS? Flashback to Jun 2004 ration ration GSM/GPRS UMTS vice Penetr vice Penetr Not the same Serv Serv gradual take-up take- Time Time Highlight from 3GSM World Congress - Cannes, 2004 Industry priorities to overcome UMTS challenges: challenges: 1.Leverage lessons learned from CDMA2000 2.Prepare for converged networks – GPRS, SIP, UMTS 3.Insure total solution – access, core, network management 4.Insure QoE at launch Alain Biston, President & G – UMTS, Nortel Networks Biston, GM S David Williams, mm02 CTO© 2011 JDS Uniphase Corporation | JDSU CONFIDENTIAL AND PROPRIETARY INFORMATION
  • 4. What did we learn from UMTS? Fast Forward to 2011 Similar uptake Service Penetration Service Penetration GSM/GPRS UMTS P P Time Time Industry Advice Action Taken by Carriers End Result Millions spent. Today approx 20 “Insure QoE at launch…” We need 100s of KPIs at launch to 30 KPIs are actually used Service uptake was gradual gradual… Need to be ready for millions of new “Insure total solution…” ROI was much longer than hungry subscribers on day 1 expected… “Prepare for converged Prepare Not much E2E visibility should ve much… should’ve Networks did not deliver to networks…” become a standard in testing consumer’s expectations© 2011 JDS Uniphase Corporation | JDSU CONFIDENTIAL AND PROPRIETARY INFORMATION
  • 5. What did we learn from UMTS? Flashback to 2007 – Where to Monitor? Serving Network Core & Services Network MGW SMS CS Core (Voice) SGW Nc Nb MSC/VLR Mc MGW SS7/SIGTRAN UMTS Terrestrial Radio Access Network (UTRAN) D/Gr HLR/HSS Iub PS Core (Data) ( ) Uu RNC Iur Gn Public  Gi Iub Iu‐CS Data  UE NodeB RNC Iu‐PS SGSN GGSN NetworkW‐CDMA  Radio Network SubsystemHSPA/HSPA+ Tactical Troubleshooting at the RNC/BSC level 100% Monitoring of Iu, A, Gb Core Interfaces: 1. High CAPEX & high data volume requires tactical approach 1. Less location, centralized 2. Movable system to perform Golden Cluster analysis 2. Capability to analyze voice quality, PS application 3. Provide strong RF / RAN post processing tools 3. Support reactive & proactive optimization processes 4. Reduce drive test & increase NodeB capacity 4. Good quality data for less cost© 2011 JDS Uniphase Corporation | JDSU CONFIDENTIAL AND PROPRIETARY INFORMATION
  • 6. What did we learn from UMTS? 2011 – Where to Monitor LTE? Serving Network Core & Services Network MGW SMS CS Core (Voice) CS Core (Voice) SGW Nc Nb MSC/VLR Mc MGW SS7/SIGTRAN UMTS Terrestrial Radio Access Network (UTRAN) D/Gr HLR/HSS Iub PS Core (Data) Uu RNC Iur Gn Public  Gi Iub Iu‐CS Data  UE NodeB RNCW‐CDMA  Iu‐PS SGSN GGSN Network Radio Network SubsystemHSPA/HSPA+ S3 S4 Gx Rx S12 Evolved Packet Core (EPC) WSP Services S‐GW (IMS, VCC, …) Evolved UTRAN (E‐UTRAN) PCRF S5 5  Uu S11 S1‐U SGi P‐GW S10 UE X2 S1‐C MRF C S6a CSCFLTE MME Evolved Node B HSSLTE Advanced© 2011 JDS Uniphase Corporation | JDSU CONFIDENTIAL AND PROPRIETARY INFORMATION
  • 7. What Did We Learn from UMTS? Intelligent Top to Bottom Visibility is Key How well is the service performing? What is the user experience? own Service Level What service have we committed to and what can we deliver? Drill up and drill do Management Are any network devices down? Performance What components are performing poorly? Management How heavily utilized are the links? p What caused the degradation in service? Troubleshooting What traffic is on the network? network? What’s causing traffic bottlenecks? What s Industry advice for LTE What do we know today? We definitely need KPIs, but not hundreds of them… as important than the Insure QoE - We need KPIs KPIs itself is the ability to quickly map the KPI to a root cause. KPIs need to support the functional processes but also provide information Insure total solution on the technical layers that deliver a service e.g. Physical Link, Bearers, Control Plane, IP Transport and Service© 2011 JDS Uniphase Corporation | JDSU CONFIDENTIAL AND PROPRIETARY INFORMATION
  • 8. Understanding what are the importantparameters to measure to help optimizean LTE Network
  • 9. Lets Learn as an Industry - LSTI LTE can deliver performance approaching theoretical limits – In a single cell with a single UE in a pure RF environment cell, True end-user realized performance will be very different – There will be neighbor cell & other interference sources – Most users will not be near the base station – Radio resources and cell throughput will be shared by many users. Trial test plans need to find true end-user performance not maximum possible eNB performance – Testing with one or two UE’s is not enough, consider as many as ten There is more to measure than just throughput – Consider C-Plane latency essential to provide an “always on” experience while minimizing load in the cell g© 2011 JDS Uniphase Corporation | JDSU CONFIDENTIAL AND PROPRIETARY INFORMATION
  • 10. Air Interface Challenges • RF Coverage Evolved UTRAN (E‐UTRAN) • RF Quality Physical Ph i l Layer • Handover Uu • Scheduling MAC Layer • Throughput UE’s Evolved Node B • User Application Performance • Throughput Application L Layer • Latency • Harmonization • Efficient use of resources Existing Technologies • Inter-RAT Handover© 2011 JDS Uniphase Corporation | JDSU CONFIDENTIAL AND PROPRIETARY INFORMATION
  • 11. ....and the Control-Plane Challenges© 2011 JDS Uniphase Corporation | JDSU CONFIDENTIAL AND PROPRIETARY INFORMATION
  • 12. A Correlated End-to-End View is Essential A basic IMSI attach involves: – 6+ Interfaces – 8+ Protocols – 19+ Transactions Mobility increases complexity: – MME / SGW Relocations – 2G I-RAT I RAT – 3G I-RAT – CS-Fallback It takes the whole end to end network to deliver an application/service to the end user. pp© 2011 JDS Uniphase Corporation | JDSU CONFIDENTIAL AND PROPRIETARY INFORMATION
  • 13. Measuring Accessibility, Mobility and Retainability LTE introduces 100s of new transactions that are used in UE eNodeB new MME Old MME/SGSN Serving GW PDN GW PCRF HSS 10s of procedures that control the users experience around 1. Attach Request 2. Attach EIR accessibility, mobility and retainability Request 3. Identification Request 3. Identification Response 4. Identity Request How do you effectively manage your network, service and network 4. Identity Response customer experience when the set of measurements could 5a. Authentication / Security 5b. Identity Request/Response run into the 100s? 6. Ciphered Options Request 5b. ME Identity Check 6. Ciphered Options Response 7. Delete Sesion Request 7. PCEF Initiated IP-CAN Session Termination (E) 7. Delete Session Response Take as an e ample one proced re the Attach Proced re example procedure Procedure:- 8. Update Location Request (A) 9. Cancel Location The attach procedure includes 19 separate transactions 9. Cancel Location Ack 10. PCEF Initiated IP-CAN before the user is able to access services (F) 10. Delete Session Request 10. Delete Session Response Session Termination (B) By managing Procedure based KPIs 4 attach procedure y g g 11. Update Location Ack 12. Create Session Request KPIs can replace 76 measurements (19 x 4):- 13. Create Session Request 14. PCEF Initiated IP-CAN Session – Attach Procedure Volume Establishment/Modification (C) 15. Create Session Response – Attach Procedure Error Rate (broken down by transaction and cause) First Downlink Data (if not handover) 16. Create Session Response – Attach Procedure Absence 17. Initial Context Setup Request / Attach Accept 18. RRC Connection Reconfiguration – Attach Procedure Setup Time 19. RRC Connection Reconfiguration Complete 20. Initial Context Setup Response 21. Direct Transfer 22. Attach Complete First Uplink Data 23. Modify Bearer Request The answer therefore is Composite KPIs reporting on key 23a. Modify Bearer Request procedure performance and quality by correlating 23b. Modify Bearer Response (D) measurement information across interfaces, transactions First Downlink Data 24. Modify Bearer Response and protocols and linked to the actual customer experience 25. Notify Request rather than transaction quality. 26. Notify Response Be l ti i B selective in what and how you measure performance t h l you h t dh f to help optimize your network© 2011 JDS Uniphase Corporation | JDSU CONFIDENTIAL AND PROPRIETARY INFORMATION
  • 14. Expanding Policy management andcontrol to optimize LTE traffic
  • 15. Expanded Policy Management to provide alternatives to flat rate tariffs and optimize LTE Traffic Research shows that flat rate tariffs will not continue in a 4G world. By expanding policy management and controls, operators can develop smarter charging plans that will provide them with a sustainable revenue stream. Examples of smarter charging plans are already appearing in the LTE segment. These policies can be used to maximise revenues with high value customers. But policy management can also be used as the mechanism to improved customer service and provide the ability to shape traffic on their mobile broadband networks. If an MNO offers access to social networking services during a defined period at a lower cost, it can make its service more affordable and attractive to users, move traffic to off peak periods and users off-peak increase quality of service and customer experience across its operation.© 2011 JDS Uniphase Corporation | JDSU CONFIDENTIAL AND PROPRIETARY INFORMATION
  • 16. Policy Based Management in LTE QoS Profile + Bearer ID QoS Parameters + Bearer ID QoS Profile + Bearer ID Subscriber ID + QoS Profile Subscriber ID + Service Flow Info Activate Activate or Modify or Modify Access Radio Bearer Session Bearer Access Apply Info & IMS UE eNB MME Bearer SGW Policy PCRF Authorizati Label Rule P-CSCF on Session MBR, MBR Info GBR & ARP Radio Conditions Subscriber ID + Service Flow Info TRANSPORT (i.e. MPLS, Metro-Ethernet, etc) LTE QoS Class Identifiers (QCI) could be used for prioritization of specific services according t operator configuration ifi i di to t fi ti QCI is a label that is applied to the EPS bearer, so that EPC and LTE nodes can prioritize packet scheduling in order to meet QoS targets for the class. QCI can be used to manage – bit rate (GBR, MBR, APN-AMBR), latency and packet loss rate However LTE QoS is Complex H Q Si C l Many QoS classes enforced by S-GW© 2011 JDS Uniphase Corporation | Up to 24 bearers in the end to end chain JDSU CONFIDENTIAL AND PROPRIETARY INFORMATION
  • 17. Lab Test Case - QoS differentiation, Policy Control & Charging QoS overhead provisioning analysis including Policy Control and Charging Compare the cell capacity first without and then with the QoS provisioned for the bandwidth that can be delivered to understand the actual impact on the overall cell capacity. Then compare, step by step, the overall impact of user mobility on cell capacity and guaranteed QoS. Validate that the proper parameters where including in the Charging information Test case process – Setup a static multi-user cell download with 6 to 10 users performing full-buffer downloads. – Measure the overall cell capacity. – Reassign one user as a mobile user with a fixed-rate UDP stream with the same megabit fixed rate megabit- per-second rate that was achieved in the full-buffer download. • Set the QoS parameters for this user to match the fixed rate of the UDP stream. • Verify that the throughput rate is in the range of 2 to 5 Mbps – Measure the overall cell capacity. – Move the user from medium to poor radio condition in five steps and repeat the cell- capacity measurements for each step. – Move the user to the cell edge for the specific data rate that was provisioned provisioned. – Measure the overall cell capacity.© 2011 JDS Uniphase Corporation | JDSU CONFIDENTIAL AND PROPRIETARY INFORMATION
  • 18. Live Deployment - Measuring QoS differentiation, Policy Control & Charging MNO’s need to ensure customer experience levels are manage proactively as differing service levels are offered to different customer segments ( g VIP) g g (e.g. ) MNO need to measure the request service level against the received service level – QCI SLA However QCI and Policy control values only appear in the control p Q y y pp plane in transactions that are related to bearer modification Measuring the requested QCI (control plane) vs received QCI (user plane) therefore requires ‘enriching’ the requested QCI into the user plane records so that comparison measurement can be made. QoS Class L2 Packet L2 Packet Example Services Identifier Delay Budget Loss Rate QCI=1 (GBR) 100 ms 10-2 Conversational Voice QCI=2 (GBR) 150 ms 10-3 Conversational Video (Live Streaming) QCI=3 (GBR) 50 ms 10-3 Real Time Gaming QCI=4 (GBR) 300 ms 10-6 Non-Conversational Video (Buffered Streaming) QCI=5 (non-GBR) 100 ms 10-6 IMS Signalling Video (Buffered Streaming) QCI=6 (non-GBR) 300 ms 10-6 TCP-based (e.g., www, e-mail, chat, ftp, p2p, video, etc.) QCI=7 (non-GBR) 100 ms 10-3 Voice, Video (Live Streaming) Interactive Gaming QCI=8 (non GBR) (non-GBR) 300 ms 10-6 6 Video (Buffered Streaming) Vid (B ff d St i ) QCI=9 (non-GBR) 300 ms 10-6 TCP-based (e.g., www, e-mail, chat, ftp, etc.)© 2011 JDS Uniphase Corporation | JDSU CONFIDENTIAL AND PROPRIETARY INFORMATION
  • 19. Reality Check and Call To Action
  • 20. Key LTE Rollout Challenges Technical Challenges – Increased complexity & interoperability (LTE as an overlay) – Multi-vendor environment – Scalability – RAN assurance – Traffic policing/shaping (mobile data traffic unbalance) – QoS management (as good or better than existing) – and many more Cost Challenges – CAPEX vs OPEX control – SW configurability (operators want more automation) – Minimal footprint and upgrade costs Organizational Challenges – Many organizations segmenting the network into non-practical boundaries – Personnel and Knowledge base is questionable at times – D li with existing t l vs new t l Dealing ith i ti tools tools© 2011 JDS Uniphase Corporation | JDSU CONFIDENTIAL AND PROPRIETARY INFORMATION
  • 21. Key LTE Rollout Challenges S f Technology & Service Adoption Lifecycle Lab Test & Initial Service Service Service Field Trial Deployment Growth Optimization Maturity Customer Revenue Business End- End-2-End Assurance Management Operators O Management M t tration Service compressed QOS Management Customer this curve in Management Care order to keepService penet investors happy Network Wide Performance Troubleshooting Management e A ti Active Service Service Test Surveillance Network OptimizationS Base Mobile Service Station Signaling Troubleshooting Commission Analysis Network Band Clearing g Network Simulation Troubleshooting T bl h ti © 2011 JDS Uniphase Corporation | JDSU CONFIDENTIAL AND PROPRIETARY INFORMATION
  • 22. Key LTE Rollout Challenges Make it work Make it work well Make it efficient 3G Lifecycle Most problems Problems Identified found and fixed Typically small number s early in the lifecycle of customers impacted Fewer problems during ramp up. found by subscribers Pre-Deployment Testing & Trials Service Ramp-up Optimize Live Network t LTE Lifecycle dentifiedProblems Id Less ti L time t fi d and to find d fix problems More problems found by early in the lifecycle. more subscribers!! Pre-Deployment Testing & Trials Service Ramp-up Optimize Live Network t © 2011 JDS Uniphase Corporation | JDSU CONFIDENTIAL AND PROPRIETARY INFORMATION
  • 23. Field Trial Insights & Summary Plan your test cases carefully – Align them to your deployment and product strategy – Leverage from industry tools & best practices – JDSU test case application note can help Address the data volume challenge g – A solution optimized for real-time processing is vital Measuring the E2E user experience is essential. – This can inform your vendor selection decisions – It is vital input into network planning, roll out and design Verify multi-vendor interoperability Verif m lti endor interoperabilit – Interoperability with existing 2G/3G network – Early implementations have some rough spots – Multi-Service Forum white paper is insightful • Available at: http://www.msforum.org/© 2011 JDS Uniphase Corporation | JDSU CONFIDENTIAL AND PROPRIETARY INFORMATION
  • 24. Call To Action Successful trials and deployments of LTE can be the cornerstone of your future success… – Get them wrong and the foundation for future mobile services and y g your competitive market position could be in jeopardy. Trial goals, criteria and methods, while technical in nature, must ultimately support your higher-level business requirements requirements. Lessons learned during trial must be carried forward into live deployments to ensure success launch and continuing support of the business g pp requirements If you fail to prepare, be prepared for failure. The focus of the discussion includes: – Industry activities in LTE testing – Highlighting a few key LTE challenges – Insight and learnings from LTE trails and live deployments – How JDSU Solutions can help Value the objectivity a test vendor provides© 2011 JDS Uniphase Corporation | JDSU CONFIDENTIAL AND PROPRIETARY INFORMATION
  • 25. Sound Test and Measurement in True End to End FashionStart with Transport Network Upgrade – More Bandwidth/Increased Rate of Deployment Deployment & Commissioning Manage Operate Service Provider Perform Test for Inter- Field Deploy in Acceptance Troubleshoot Manage & Operate Optimize Operate Operability Deployment Trial & Commissioning Network Test Service Providers Field Tools Field Tools SDH / Optical Access Tester/Platform Service Assurance Systems PM and Test & Automated Troubleshooting g Test and Turn-up Continue with LTE Deployment – Managing Complexity & Maximizing Efficiencies Design Verify, Develop, and Manufacture g y, p, Deployment & Commissioning p y g Manage g Operate p Network Equipment Manufacturers and Service Provider Labs Develop new Inte- Perform Test Test for Inter- Field Deploy in Design, Verify, Develop Operability services and Software Acceptance Deployment & Commissioning Trial Network Manage & Operate Operate Troubleshoot Optimize Infrastructure Test Test Service Providers Network Protocol Analyzers Protocol Analysis Drive Test Systems Drive Service Assurance Systems Test Wireless Service Assurance© 2011 JDS Uniphase Corporation | JDSU CONFIDENTIAL AND PROPRIETARY INFORMATION
  • 26. A Global Company Employees: 4,600 Locations: 80+ sites globally Global Presence: 164 countries Annual Revenue: $1.3B Index Membership: S&P 500 Leader in LTE test© 2011 JDS Uniphase Corporation | JDSU CONFIDENTIAL AND PROPRIETARY INFORMATION
  • 27. Thank You for Your Attention

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