Automation in road transportation and its implications on user safety and cyber-security
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Like this? Share it with your network

Share
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Be the first to comment
    Be the first to like this
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
531
On Slideshare
531
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0

Actions

Shares
Downloads
2
Comments
0
Likes
0

Embeds 0

No embeds

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Smarter Thinking. © MIRA Ltd 2014 Smarter Thinking. © MIRA Ltd 2014 Dr Ireri Ibarra Chief Engineer, Functional Safety Automation in road transportation and its implications on user safety and cyber-security May 2014 'The State of the Nation' Automotive & Transport SIG
  • 2. Smarter Thinking. © MIRA Ltd 2014 Agenda Road vehicle attributes Road transportation Lifecycle Automation May 2014
  • 3. Smarter Thinking. © MIRA Ltd 2014 Road vehicle expected attributes High reliability and safety Reduced emissions and fuel consumption Increased comfort Styling/ additional extras Connectivity and gadgets May 2014
  • 4. Smarter Thinking. © MIRA Ltd 2014 Trends in the automotive industry Higher electronics content to - Deliver highly tuned, fully customisable functionality - Meet stakeholder demands - Meet environmental legislation requirements ⇒ Particularly in focus for hybrid and electric vehicles Drive towards higher automation of driving tasks … - Improving road safety Brand differentiation and brand DNA implications
  • 5. Smarter Thinking. © MIRA Ltd 2014 Unique automotive safety issues Mass-market consumer product - Everyone has a view! - Any perceived issues can lead to widespread adverse publicity Long product lifetimes with maintenance difficult to assure outside warranty - Maintenance and aftermarket issues Driver is part of control loop but receives little formal training in operating safety- related systems
  • 6. Smarter Thinking. © MIRA Ltd 2014 Road infrastructure Maintenance (in part) Legacy (sector specific) Air-gapped (no connectivity) May 2014
  • 7. Smarter Thinking. © MIRA Ltd 2014 Roadside technology trends Inter-system communications e.g. NTCIP (National Transportation Communications for Intelligent Transportation System (ITS) Protocol) Distributed control systems Vehicle–infrastructure communications Increasing safety-related functionality, examples: - UK hard shoulder running on motorways (M42 “active traffic management”) - US Express Lanes (I 495, 110, US 36) May 2014
  • 8. Smarter Thinking. © MIRA Ltd 2014 Emergency services Confusion Inaccuracy of location Inability to place a call May 2014
  • 9. Smarter Thinking. © MIRA Ltd 2014 Emergency services eCall - Pan-European - Automated - Accurate and prompt May 2014
  • 10. Smarter Thinking. © MIRA Ltd 2014 Goods transportation Delays introduced by manual processes Route / track - Theft Misuse May 2014
  • 11. Smarter Thinking. © MIRA Ltd 2014 Goods transportation More automation on routing, tacking and even packing May 2014
  • 12. Smarter Thinking. © MIRA Ltd 2014 Personal transportation May 2014
  • 13. Smarter Thinking. © MIRA Ltd 2014 Commonalities Electronic systems (Suppliers) Information systems Hazards Threats May 2014
  • 14. Smarter Thinking. © MIRA Ltd 2014 Road vehicle lifecycle May 2014 Concept Design Manufacturing Sales Use Service Disposal
  • 15. Smarter Thinking. © MIRA Ltd 2014 Road vehicle lifecycle May 2014 Concept Design Manufacturing Sales Use Service Disposal Safety
  • 16. Smarter Thinking. © MIRA Ltd 2014 Road vehicle lifecycle May 2014 Concept Design Manufacturing Sales Use Service Disposal Security
  • 17. Smarter Thinking. © MIRA Ltd 2014 Present concerns Higher degree of system authority Varied threats with different motivation (financial, criminal, recreational) Preparation for situations that may decrease safety levels - ‘We demonstrate that an attacker who is able to infiltrate virtually any Electronic Control Unit (ECU) can leverage this ability to completely circumvent a broad array of safety-critical systems.’ 1 - Transportation is a complex sector - Systems of systems where a given system is composed by a number of elements which are medium to large scale systems on their own. May 2014 1 University of Washington, Center for Automotive Embedded Systems Security K. Koscher, A. Czeskis, F.Roesner, S. Patel, T. Kohno, S.Checkoway, D. McCoy, B.Kantor, D. Anderson, H.Shacham, S.Savage.Experimental Security Analysis of a Modern Automobile, E Symposium on Security and Privacy, Oakland, CA, May 16–19, 2010.
  • 18. Smarter Thinking. © MIRA Ltd 2014 Levels of automation and examples NHTSA EC SAE Level 0 – Non automated Driver only Level 0 – Non automated Level 1 – Function specific automation Assisted Level 1 – Assisted Level 2 – Combined function automation Semi-automated Level 2 – Partial automation Level 3 – Limited self-driving automation Highly automated Level 3 – Conditional automation Level 4 – Full self- driving automation Level 4 – High automation Level 5 – Full automation May 2014 TJA AEB We Deliver Smarter Thinking. 18 LDW LKA
  • 19. Smarter Thinking. © MIRA Ltd 2014 Risk management triad Prevention MitigationReaction Safety Cybersecurity May 2014
  • 20. Smarter Thinking. © MIRA Ltd 2014 ReactionPrevention Product development lifecycle KO TRL3 TRL7 TRL9 Production Validation and testing Concept formulation System design System deployment System implementation Mitigation
  • 21. Smarter Thinking. © MIRA Ltd 2014 Conclusions Road vehicles and infrastructure trends are including more electronic controls which are automating some tasks and hence uncompromised availability is essential. As tasks become more automated, hazards due to malfunctions of electronic systems are unacceptable and more rigour has to be part of the design lifecycle. Some of the more automated tasks are only possible when different systems cooperate and share information; as connectivity increases, more safeguards against cyber security have also to be incorporated in their design. A sound and comprehensive risk management strategy to incorporate requirements for prevention, mitigation and reaction to both safety and cyber security threats must be made part of any product quality management system. May 2014
  • 22. Smarter Thinking. © MIRA Ltd 2014 Contact details May 2014 MIRA Ltd Watling Street, Nuneaton, Warwickshire, CV10 0TU, UK T: +44 (0)24 7635 5000 F: +44 (0)24 7635 8000 www.mira.co.uk Dr Ireri Ibarra BEng, PhD Chief engineer, Functional Safety Direct T: +44 (0)24 7635 5415 E: ireri.ibarra@mira.co.uk