What is Transfer Pricing – Transfer
pricing as the name suggests, is the transfer
of     goods    and     services   withi...
(e)    There is a great deal of diversity in the definition of related party.



Implications:

          Tax Arbitrage- I...
Cost plus method- This approach requires the companies to add a mark up on their
       cost. The mark up must be comparab...
appropriate method has to be applied for determining ALP in the manner prescribed
   under Rules 10 A to 10C notified vide...
     Transaction by Transaction
                        Aggregate of similar Transactions
                        Based...
TNMM, or
                 Any other method prescribed by the CBDT.

Documentation/ 13 Different types of documents are req...
Undesirable Corporate Practices Related to Transfer Pricing

Some of the related party transactions, which are usually res...
Some examples of such abuses are given below:

Case 1 on evasion of customs duty and taxes
thereon

The parent unit is sup...
is a case where diversion of funds and transfer of funds at below cost is resorted to in order to
avoid a legitimate retur...
The issue before the public is denying genuine Indian investors of the advantage of equity
participation by company „A‟ ge...
The units operating under the second method were found to have vastly superior
manufacturing efficiencies.

This TP mechan...
during some periods. Some times even the lean season rates are unjustifiably & very higher-
nothing but diversion of funds...
Direct Tax Code – The way Forward:
   o Introduction of the concept of Advance Pricing Agreement (APA), decision valid for...
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Transfer Pricing

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Transfer Pricing, India, AS 18, Tax, Draft Tax Code, Tax evasion, Corporate Governance

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Transfer Pricing

  1. 1. What is Transfer Pricing – Transfer pricing as the name suggests, is the transfer of goods and services within the organization. The key implication in the process is that the prices are set within the organization and hence a chance of manipulation is always there. The loopholes in the whole system can be exploited by MNCs as well as the domestic companies to book higher or lower profits depending on the situation and hence strict rules and regulations are needed to curb the manipulations. Transfer Pricing Manipulation (TPM) as it is normally called is not only relevant in cross border transactions where revenues of one country gets transferred to another (where tax rates are more favorable) but is also relevant within country , where companies try to take advantages of different level of sales tax and VAT by using the process of TPM. But luckily or unluckily Transfer Pricing provisions are applicable only when – 1. Their is an international transaction(s) [defined in Sec 92B] „between‟ 2. Two or more Associated enterprises [defined in Sec 92A]. Current Regulatory Regime in India & Globally: (a) Indian and global tax authorities have armed themselves with substantial powers to plug the tax evasion that arises from creative transfer pricing. (b) Transactions between related parties come under the ambit of Accounting Standard AS 18 in India and IAS 24 internationally. These standards require disclosure of certain aspects of such transactions. (c) Neither in India nor elsewhere in the world have company law authorities prescribed transfer pricing methods or disclosures. (d) The methodologies for determining arm‟s length transfer prices (Comparable Uncontrolled Price, Resale Price Method etc.) are broadly the same in India and abroad. http://nirajagarwal.blogspot.com/ Page 1
  2. 2. (e) There is a great deal of diversity in the definition of related party. Implications: Tax Arbitrage- If there are no strict rules and regulations, an MNC would like to operate in such a manner that most of its profits are booked in those subsidiaries which are located in tax heavens. Hence they would adopt such transfer pricing mechanisms that goods in subsidiaries are bought at the lowest minimum prices and hence a supernormal profit resulting in lower taxes compared to other places. In order to curb this practices, tax authorities are very strict worldwide in related party transactions. Recently Glaxosmithkline in 2006 had to part away with US dollar 3.1 billion as penalty for adopting improper transfer pricing mechanisms. Effects of TPM on countries: Loss of tax revenue & Custom duty. Unfavorable BOP statements. Flow of FDI is more where there are easier norms for Transfer pricing. Methods of price calculation: The Finance Act 2001 introduced detailed mechanism to deal with TPM. The idea was to determine whether the transactions are carried on at “arm‟s length price”. Arm‟s Length Price is the price charged during uncontrollable transactions. Two most common methods are – 1. Checking the price in a similar transaction between two unrelated parties, A B Vs C D 2. Checking the price in a similar transaction where one party is related, A B Vs A C The various methods to find the arm‟s length price are - Comparable uncontrolled price method- In order to judge the fairness of the price charged, the prices of two independent companies are compared with the company and its subsidiary in question. http://nirajagarwal.blogspot.com/ Page 2
  3. 3. Cost plus method- This approach requires the companies to add a mark up on their cost. The mark up must be comparable to the firm in the same sector. This method also require the firm to stick to the below mentioned methods for their cost accounting o Actual cost approach o Standard cost approach o Variable cost approach o Marginal cost approach The issue of fixed cost and cost of R&D though remains unanswered in this approach. Resale Price method- It is the same as the cost plus method , the only difference being here the mark up is subtracted from the final selling price to arrive at the fair price. The mark up is obtained from the similar firm in same industry. Though the process is difficult to implement in case of intangible goods as the cost of technological know-how, R&D is difficult to ascertain correctly. Non Transactional Methods: In non transactional methods, related parties income figures are considered and adjusted according to their share. These are: o Profit Split Method (PSM): PSM is used when AEs transactions are so integrated that it becomes impossible to conduct a TP analysis on a transactional basis. First, the combined net profit incurring to related enterprises from a transaction is determined. Then, the combined net profit is allocated between related enterprises with reference to market returns achieved by independent entities in similar transactions. The relative contribution of related parties is then evaluated on the basis of assets employed, functions performed or to be performed and risk assumed. o Transactional Net Margin Method (TNMM): TNMM is normally adopted in cases of transfer of semi-finished goods, distribution of finished products (where resale price method (RPM) cannot be adequately applied) and transactions involving the provision of services. TNMM compares the net profit margin relative to an appropriate base (sales, assets or costs incurred) of the tested party with net profit margin of the independent enterprises in similar transactions after making adjustments regarding functional differences and risk involved. Under the Indian TP regime, there is no hierarchy in terms of preferred methods of determining ALP. Indeed, as per section 92C (2) of the Income Tax 1961, the most http://nirajagarwal.blogspot.com/ Page 3
  4. 4. appropriate method has to be applied for determining ALP in the manner prescribed under Rules 10 A to 10C notified vide S.O. 808 E dated 21.8.2001. Some of the difficulties in identifying the ALP are – Copyright Administrative Issues Problems Specialised Confidentiality nature of Issues goods/services Roadblocks The major operational Problems are – Determination of ALP o Some intra-group transactions are so unique that they can-not be compared o TP reports of two AE‟s would have conflicting conclusions o No recommended Profit Level Indicator (PLI) – wide fluctuations may result depending upon each PLI. o Corporates hesitant to disclose information o Major countries do not require rejection of other methods Databases o gap in search of Databases o Non availability of recognized databases o Lack of comparables Benchmarking o No recommended method for benchmarking http://nirajagarwal.blogspot.com/ Page 4
  5. 5.  Transaction by Transaction  Aggregate of similar Transactions  Based on Functions  For each AE separately o Arm‟s Length Range Vs Arithmetic Mean o Pricing of Intangibles – soft targets o Difficulty in justifying adjustments for factors having a bearing on prices o Insufficient information available for calculating gross margins o In case of rapidly fluctuating prices, which prices to compare with. To summarise the position of India in TP is – Legal Position The Finance Act 2001 introduced with effect from Assessment Year 2002- 2003, detailed Transfer Pricing regulations vide Section 92 to 92F of the Income Tax Act , 1961. The Central Board of Direct Taxes (CBDT) has come out with Transfer Pricing Rules - Rule 10A to Rule 10E. Applicability Transfer Pricing provisions are applicable based on some criteria: Firstly, There must be an international transaction, Secondly, such international transaction must be between two or more associated enterprises, either or both of whom are non-resident/s. Pricing Method Arm's Length Price is to be determined by adopting any one of the following Allowed methods, : being the most appropriate method: CUP method, Resale Price Method, CPM, Profit Split Method, http://nirajagarwal.blogspot.com/ Page 5
  6. 6. TNMM, or Any other method prescribed by the CBDT. Documentation/ 13 Different types of documents are required to be maintained. These are- Return (1) Enterprise-wise documents- Description of the enterprise, Relationship with other associated enterprises, Nature of business carried out. (2) Transaction-specific documents_ Information regarding each transaction, Description of the functions performed, Assets employed and risks assumed by each party to the transaction, Economic & Market Analysis etc. (3) Computation related documents- Describe in details the method considered, Actual working assumptions, policies etc., Adjustment made to transfer price, Any other relevant information, data, documents relied for determination of arm's Length price etc. A report from a Chartered Accountant in the prescribed form giving details of transactions is required to be submitted within a specific time limit. Penalty Penalty for concealment of income or furnishing inacurate particulars thereof- 100% to 300% of the tax sought to be evaded. Penalty for failure to keep and maintain information and documents in respect of International transaction- 2% of the value of each international transaction Penalty for failure to furnish report under Section 92E- Rs. 100000/- http://nirajagarwal.blogspot.com/ Page 6
  7. 7. Undesirable Corporate Practices Related to Transfer Pricing Some of the related party transactions, which are usually resorted to for diversion of funds are detailed below. (a) Purchase of goods or services from a related party at little or no cost or at inflated prices to the entity. (b) Payments for services never rendered or at inflated prices. (c) Sales at below market rates to an unnecessary “middle man” related party, who in turn sells to the ultimate customer at a higher price with the related party (and ultimately its principals) retaining the difference. (d) Purchases of assets at prices in excess of fair market value. (e) Use of trade names or patent rights at exorbitant rates even after their expiry or at a price much higher than the price, which can not be described as reasonable. (f) Borrowing or lending on an interest-free basis or at a rate of interest significantly above or below market rates prevailing at the time of the transaction. (g) Exchanging property for similar property in a non monetary transaction. (h) Selling real estate at a price that differs significantly from its appraised value. (i) Accruing interest at above market rates on loans. http://nirajagarwal.blogspot.com/ Page 7
  8. 8. Some examples of such abuses are given below: Case 1 on evasion of customs duty and taxes thereon The parent unit is supplying raw materials to its 100% EOU subsidiary located separately at an estimated cost which covers raw material costs and variable conversion charges. The EOU unit reckons this cost as its purchase cost of raw materials and adds value to the raw material to produce the final product which is exported from this unit. Since the 100% EOU is exempt from customs duty and excise duty on finished product there is no payment of duty on this account by the 100% EOU. The transfer of raw materials from the parent unit being below the full cost of the product there is an inbuilt mechanism to divert profits from the main company to the 100% EOU unit which enjoys exemption from various duties and taxes. The FOB value of exports being approximately Rs100 crores in a given year the impact of taxes can be worked out. Case 2 on investment in a subsidiary The parent company is giving loans to its subsidiary companies on an interest free basis which remains unpaid for more than 5 years now. The amount of interest free loans given to its subsidiaries totals Rs1500 crores. The parent company is a flag ship company and has a wide range of products in manufacturing and trading. Some of the subsidiary companies have not taken off at all and some of them have become defunct and there is no action for recovery by the parent. The annual loss on interest to the parent company on a notional basis at 15% p.a. is estimated at Rs220 cr. This is a clear suppression of profits arising from evasion of legitimate income resulting from the diversion of borrowed funds by pledging of assets by the parent company. Since the company is making profits, no queries are raised by outside agencies as they get regular interest payments and repayment of loans without a default. This http://nirajagarwal.blogspot.com/ Page 8
  9. 9. is a case where diversion of funds and transfer of funds at below cost is resorted to in order to avoid a legitimate return to the shareholders. Case 3 Mismanagement by holding company of companies under the same management Many of the companies resort to formation of 100% holding companies to control totally the management which is the company providing funds to various companies in the same management. Many of them do not go for public finances as the holding company takes care of the entire financial structuring for these related companies. These companies mostly do not trade in the open market by listing, as the shares are closely held by the parent company. The surpluses of the subsidiary go back to the parent company in the form of high rates of dividends. The investment of funds gets a good return to the parent company which has several baskets of companies to set off profits against losses and minimize the payment of taxes to the authorities. This is a very clear case of legitimate tax avoidance beyond the legal net. This type of promoter controlled business is widely resorted to as a corporate strategy to avoid taxes by the holding company and this is well within the laws of land. The question before the public is how is the profit suppression by business conglomerates to be addressed. As more and more MNCs are stepping into our country the flight of foreign exchange by diversion of funds is a serious concern to the country. The disclosures will not serve any purpose as there is no violation of the accepted form of investment. What is required is to consider payment of dividends to holding companies as a related party transaction and to regulate such payments which may be beyond the prescribed investment norms. Case 4 Siphoning of funds by formation of Joint ventures In forming a JV Company „A‟, a foreign company supplies plant and machinery and technology to Company „B‟ located in India. Mostly the plant and machinery is old but categorised as refurbished to avail of the benefits of depreciation and other allowances. For technology transfer the Company „A‟ is paid a hefty amount as technical fees by Company „B‟ based on volume of sales. The Company „A‟ treats the supply of plant and machinery as their share of the JV investments. Company „B‟ pays dividends treating the value of plant and machinery as equity participation apart from paying royalty and technical knowhow fees for technology transfer. http://nirajagarwal.blogspot.com/ Page 9
  10. 10. The issue before the public is denying genuine Indian investors of the advantage of equity participation by company „A‟ getting additional rights issue and bonus issues for no consideration and beyond the value of plant and machinery supplied. Over the years it could be found that Company A‟s share of equity and royalty payments far exceed the value of the assets invested by the company. There is flight of capital as dividends paid for expanded capital not to forget payments as technology transfer which is difficult to measure. Case 5 – Indian MNC covering all aspects The company was established over 50 years ago and is listed on the BSE. The sector in which the company operated was reserved for the small scale industry. In order to maintain its market leadership, the company had to find new methods of holding on to its manufacturing base and expanding it to keep pace with market demand. The company continued to invest heavily in R&D and Plant and Machinery. It floated joint ventures and/or companies where the major shareholder was its distributor in each region. It transferred its old plant and machinery to the new companies at a price just below the Rs. 20 lakh ceiling then in force for a company to qualify as an SSI unit. The management and operational control of each of these smaller manufacturing entities rested entirely with the MNC. The MNC operated each of these smaller companies through 2 modes. 1. In the first mode, all Raw Material and Packing Material was supplied by the parent company to each manufacturing facility. The finished product was shipped to company warehouses and distributor godowns for onward movement in the company‟s supply chain. 2. In the second mode of operation, each smaller company was allowed to negotiate and source raw and packing material (primary items only from approved suppliers) and do its own manufacturing. The manufacturing unit was run under a very stringent Standard costing system where standard cost of procurement and standard selling prices (TP) were fixed in March of each year. The TP was fixed with a small profit margin based on the tight standard costs of material. The finished product was sold to the MNC at the TP (based on Standard Cost+Margin). The MNC would then sell the FG at it normal price after markup. http://nirajagarwal.blogspot.com/ Page 10
  11. 11. The units operating under the second method were found to have vastly superior manufacturing efficiencies. This TP mechanism was designed to meet 4 objectives 1. Overcome the constraints imposed by government policy (reservation). 2. Take advantage of the lower excise duty for SSIs. 3. Drive towards greater manufacturing and operational efficiencies. 4. Continue to take advantage of utilizing almost fully depreciated assets while keeping up new investment levels in the parent company. Over the next 30 years the company continued to maintain its leadership position in the market and its share continues to remain one of the most valuable shares in the Indian stock market. The recent deregulation of the sector in which the company operates may see a marked change in manufacturing strategy. Case 6: Cement Industry: A major plant, with a capacity of more than 0.60 Million TPA used to sell surplus Clinker to Grinding units. Generally, every Cement plant keeps higher capacity upto clinker stage, in order to ensure continuous supply of Cement in the market even during Kiln shut down for periodical maintenance. The surplus clinker is sold to various other small grinding units. In the instant case the close relatives of Promoters got other Small / Mini Cement Plants to which the clinker is sold @ Rs.250/- to Rs.300/- per ton where as they use to sell @ Rs. 950/- to Rs.1000/- in the market, the cost of production works out to more than Rs. 800/- per ton. This practice is prevalent in many Cement units. In the instant case, the Cement unit became Sick and FIs & Banks have to forge substantial amounts Coal and Cement transport are generally done by outside transport contractors for a Cement unit. Many of the Promoters also promote transport companies under benami names or through relatives who are given contract for transport of Coal, Cement or other Raw materials. Rates of the transport very substantially from period to period, on questioned for such variations they are explained as market exigencies are the reasons for higher payments http://nirajagarwal.blogspot.com/ Page 11
  12. 12. during some periods. Some times even the lean season rates are unjustifiably & very higher- nothing but diversion of funds. Case 7 - Paper Industry Paper is sold through a large dealer network. Most of the dealers are either relatives or relatives of relatives under benami Partnerships. Paper is sold to the related parties at a much discounted / lower rates. Similarly the transport of various Materials & Paper is also done through related party transport companies. Major chemicals for e.g. Lime (high purity) is also purchased from related party companies having Lime Kilns Case 8 - Pharmaceutical Industry: Third party Loan Licensing for manufacturing and system of distribution / selling agencies for Sales are very common. The final rates for various conversion jobs are fixed as a part of profit planning exercise. It is also observed that substantial year-end journal vouchers are passed giving rebates / discounts / reimbursement of special expenses etc., for Selling Agencies / Distributors in related party accounts. Case 9 - Multinational Companies Various multinational brands have certain ingredients which give the flavour / fragrance / taste, to their brand patents. The cost of purchase of such items changes from period to period, even some times quarter to quarter. The invoices and other documentations are built up and journal vouchers are passed at the period end against advanced payments made from time to time. Such entries are made even for Technical Services rendered on adhoc basis in the name of a Technical Up-gradation, Consultancy Fees etc., in addition to huge Royalty and Sales commission. http://nirajagarwal.blogspot.com/ Page 12
  13. 13. Direct Tax Code – The way Forward: o Introduction of the concept of Advance Pricing Agreement (APA), decision valid for five consecutive years and binding on both parties. o Introduction of Impermissible Avoidance Agreement. o Widened the base for Transfer Pricing compliance by reducing the shareholding criteria from present 26% to 10%. o Replacement of value based strategy to risk based strategy. o Reduction of penalty from 2% of the transaction value to a minimum of Rs 2 lakh. The upper limit of income adjusted penalty has been reduced from 300% to 200% of tax on adjustment. http://nirajagarwal.blogspot.com/ Page 13

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