Zack constructivismlearningtheory

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Zack constructivismlearningtheory

  1. 1. Constructivism ZZ
  2. 2. CONSTRUCTIVISM How people learn? People construct their own understanding and knowledge of the world, through experiencing things and reflecting on those experiences.
  3. 3. CONSTRUCTIVISMIMPORTANT FIGURES 1. Jean Piaget  Developed cognitive learning theory  Children-Active learners (Didn’t need motivation from adults)  4 cognitive stages  1. Sensoritmotor= Learning through sensor & motor actions  2. Preoperational= through symbols & images  3. Cognitive Operational= Think logically, understand other view points  4.Formal Operational= Abstract thinking, formulate own beliefs
  4. 4. CONSTRUCTIVISMIMPORTANT FIGURES Jerome Bruner  Learning is active process where new ideas or concepts are constructed on current or past knowledge  Method: Many different activities (i.e. painting, songs, electronic flash cards)  Socratic Method – Discussion, thinking critically of own and others views and articulate and defend position.  LEARNING IS DISCOVERY
  5. 5. CONSTRUCTIVISMIMPORTANT FIGURES Lev Vygotsky  Social Cognition  Learning by social development  Zone of Proximal Development  Difference between problem solving ability and potential from the help of a teacher • Collaborative Learning  situation in which two or more people learn or attempt to learn something together  Scaffolding- Discover child’s cognitive/social development and construct learning experiences on it  Anchored Instruction- Connect to information already held by student
  6. 6. CONSTRUCTIVISMIMPORTANT FIGURES John Dewey • Father of American Education • Learning should engage and experiences of learners • Actively inquire Progressive Education Movement  Educate whole child, physically, mentally, and socially  Pragmatism- theory is only valuable for practical use Education is a social process  1896- Began University Elementary School, or Laboratory School ( AKA the Dewey School)
  7. 7. Classroom ImplicationsTEACHERS• Facilitate learning• Encourage Students To Ask Questions• Encourage Reflection• Active Participation• Variety Of Learning Methods• Propose Contrary Beliefs
  8. 8. Classroom ImplicationsSTUDENTS Building On Previous Knowledge Work In Groups Ask Questions Thinking Reflecting Establishing Views
  9. 9. Final Thoughts I believe constructivism can be a very useful and successful learning theory. It aims at developing what I believe are vital attributes in our students, learning through critical thinking, reflecting by experience, and a continual thirst for knowledge. Though constructivism may be at the heart of my teaching philosophy, it could prove to be fairly difficult to employ. Critics say constructivism dismisses a teacher’s role because it strays away from the traditional regurgitation of facts into an atmosphere of inquiring. I imagine if employed, the teacher must have a strong sense of authority accompanied by a sense of comfort from the students to create an controlled open world of discussion. All in all, it’s a method definitely worth considering.
  10. 10. Credits Imagesecavey.files.wordpress.c#30DF8Bgroup3007fall10.wikispac#30DD8Bwww.instructionaldesign.#30DB20faculty.mercer.edu/.webloc Other Sourceswww.thirteen.org/.weblocen.wikipedia.org/wiki/Co#30DB14

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