Teaching and Learning in Webinars
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Teaching and Learning in Webinars

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Presentation for Community College of Australia webinar series

Presentation for Community College of Australia webinar series

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  • Most virtual classroom products include:live audio and text communication between trainers and learners. Participants use headsets to communicate through audiographic material like PowerPoint slides which is broadcast to all participants.Capacity to run polls to gain input or feedback from themCapacity for the presenter share an application (e.g. Word or Excel) running on their desktop so that the group can work together collaboratively on a document or other resource. The presenter can often hand over application sharing to another member of the groupa shared whiteboard space for text and drawingcan browse the Web and conduct web toursAbility to share files with the participants.Capacity for all users to display live video from a web camPotential to bring in an online guest presenter from anywhere in the worldA “break out” rooms that enable small group work onlineTools to archive or record to enable later reviewing of a trainer led session.can be integrated into a learning management to automate sessions set ups, links and recording play back access by learners (for example Blackboard, Moodle).
  • There are two modes of delivery using Online Facilitated learning:Synchronous learning refers to a group of people learning the same things at the same time in the same place. Asynchronous learning refers to a student-centered teaching method that uses online learning resources to facilitate information sharing outside the constraints of time and place among a network of people (e.g. students, workers, hobby enthusiasts, etc) Asynchronous learning is based on a student-centered approach that emphasises the importance of peer-to-peer interactions.Lets first look at Online Facilitated approaches using Synchronous learning.Photo Credit: http://www.flickr.com/photos/trekkyandy/1511951150/sizes/l/in/photostream/ trekkyandy
  • e-learning can use a variety of delivery methods to learners includingFlexible, Self Paced, Trainer or computer assessedBlended Facilitated onlineInformal networks based on knowledge sharingThere is no one size fits all with e-learning. Like all training the final model depends on the RTO’s capacity to respond to Industry, Employer and Trainee needs and preferences.Photo Credit: "http://www.flickr.com/photos/18282040@N00/55134202/ Licensed under a creative commons license
  • Typical synchronous learning events facilitated online in a mature blended learning approach may include:Online workshop, tutorial or underpinning knowledge training program conducted online using a Virtual Classroom. Trainers deliver content through lecture, PowerPoint, share whiteboard, web quests, guest speakers, assessment task presentations and video underpinned by group discussions using inbuilt voice and text facilities. Trainers deliver content through lecture, PowerPoint, smart board, web quests, guest speakers, assessment task presentations and video underpinned by group discussions.learners communicating on course work using instant messaging systems such as Google Chat, Facebook chat, Twitter or SMSIndividual or group student support provided by a trainer using voice over internet tools such as Skype or Google ChatPhoto Credit http://www.flickr.com/photos/88758748@N00/3758519690/
  • We often think of sign ups to courses as Induction, the enrolment process, government paper work, facilities tours etc. With online learning we have to consider a wider induction, made up of 4 distinct introductionsTechnology – Each learning technology you are using should be introduced in an activity that isnt directly connected to assessment or learning activites. Use these are getting to know you opportunities while the learners get to know the technology:Post an introduction to your forumUpload an image of themselves to the LMSDiscuss their job role and overall personal aimsComment and build on insights shared by othersTime Management – suggested strategies for taking responsibility for understanding deadlines. Made more critical is some learning is to be self paced. Consider regular email reminders, directed personal emails to stragglers or those clearly not coping/participating. Collaborative – will your students being working together in some form of group project? Many learners struggle to work in teams in face to face situations. The weight of sifting ideas, reflecting, adjusting information and opinions, fighting to get their point included can be very difficult once these activities move online.Peer Review activities are the perfect way to introduce learners to collaborative learning. Group work has to be carefully supported by the trainer to be successful.Organising Information – most elearning courses still contain access to handout material – be it powerpoint, word documents, PDFs, sound files etc. We’ve all seem learners whose face to face folders are a shambles of unorganised paper and handouts. Same goes for digital learners. Support learners to build their digital literacy skills by modelling the organisation of information particularly for:-storing filesSaving URLs and web addressFollowing Industry blogsCreating and building networks
  • e-learning uses electronic media to deliver flexible vocational education and training. It does not include:  email dissemination of course information email communication between a teacher/trainer and learner on a single learning issue online administration of learning activities. online repository of filesThese are considered support rather than learning events.Photo Credit: http://www.flickr.com/photos/44124404848@N01/150068537/
  • For each course we can determine the best mix of delivery modes according to:Infrastructure available to deliver in each modeCapability of our organisation and our learners to teach and learn in each modeStrategic choices about how to package courses for blended learningThe types of content we will need to deliveryLearning activitiesAssessment methods and potential for assessment submission.
  • Typical synchronous learning events facilitated online in a mature blended learning approach may include:Online workshop, tutorial or underpinning knowledge training program conducted online using a Virtual Classroom. Trainers deliver content through lecture, PowerPoint, share whiteboard, web quests, guest speakers, assessment task presentations and video underpinned by group discussions using inbuilt voice and text facilities. Trainers deliver content through lecture, PowerPoint, smart board, web quests, guest speakers, assessment task presentations and video underpinned by group discussions.learners communicating on course work using instant messaging systems such as Google Chat, Facebook chat, Twitter or SMSIndividual or group student support provided by a trainer using voice over internet tools such as Skype or Google ChatPhoto Credit http://www.flickr.com/photos/88758748@N00/3758519690/
  • Some examples of how RTOs facilitate online learning interaction includesGroup research projectsQnA of industry experts/past learnersOnline lectureAssessment task pitch & presentationPeer Review of learners’ workRole playGroup problem solvingRemote trainee/third party assessor catch upAssessment verification and moderationRPL
  • Typical synchronous learning events facilitated online in a mature blended learning approach may include:Online workshop, tutorial or underpinning knowledge training program conducted online using a Virtual Classroom. Trainers deliver content through lecture, PowerPoint, share whiteboard, web quests, guest speakers, assessment task presentations and video underpinned by group discussions using inbuilt voice and text facilities. Trainers deliver content through lecture, PowerPoint, smart board, web quests, guest speakers, assessment task presentations and video underpinned by group discussions.learners communicating on course work using instant messaging systems such as Google Chat, Facebook chat, Twitter or SMSIndividual or group student support provided by a trainer using voice over internet tools such as Skype or Google ChatPhoto Credit http://www.flickr.com/photos/88758748@N00/3758519690/
  • Typical synchronous learning events facilitated online in a mature blended learning approach may include:Online workshop, tutorial or underpinning knowledge training program conducted online using a Virtual Classroom. Trainers deliver content through lecture, PowerPoint, share whiteboard, web quests, guest speakers, assessment task presentations and video underpinned by group discussions using inbuilt voice and text facilities. Trainers deliver content through lecture, PowerPoint, smart board, web quests, guest speakers, assessment task presentations and video underpinned by group discussions.learners communicating on course work using instant messaging systems such as Google Chat, Facebook chat, Twitter or SMSIndividual or group student support provided by a trainer using voice over internet tools such as Skype or Google ChatPhoto Credit http://www.flickr.com/photos/88758748@N00/3758519690/
  • Typical synchronous learning events facilitated online in a mature blended learning approach may include:Online workshop, tutorial or underpinning knowledge training program conducted online using a Virtual Classroom. Trainers deliver content through lecture, PowerPoint, share whiteboard, web quests, guest speakers, assessment task presentations and video underpinned by group discussions using inbuilt voice and text facilities. Trainers deliver content through lecture, PowerPoint, smart board, web quests, guest speakers, assessment task presentations and video underpinned by group discussions.learners communicating on course work using instant messaging systems such as Google Chat, Facebook chat, Twitter or SMSIndividual or group student support provided by a trainer using voice over internet tools such as Skype or Google ChatPhoto Credit http://www.flickr.com/photos/88758748@N00/3758519690/
  • Typical synchronous learning events facilitated online in a mature blended learning approach may include:Online workshop, tutorial or underpinning knowledge training program conducted online using a Virtual Classroom. Trainers deliver content through lecture, PowerPoint, share whiteboard, web quests, guest speakers, assessment task presentations and video underpinned by group discussions using inbuilt voice and text facilities. Trainers deliver content through lecture, PowerPoint, smart board, web quests, guest speakers, assessment task presentations and video underpinned by group discussions.learners communicating on course work using instant messaging systems such as Google Chat, Facebook chat, Twitter or SMSIndividual or group student support provided by a trainer using voice over internet tools such as Skype or Google ChatPhoto Credit http://www.flickr.com/photos/88758748@N00/3758519690/
  • Typical synchronous learning events facilitated online in a mature blended learning approach may include:Online workshop, tutorial or underpinning knowledge training program conducted online using a Virtual Classroom. Trainers deliver content through lecture, PowerPoint, share whiteboard, web quests, guest speakers, assessment task presentations and video underpinned by group discussions using inbuilt voice and text facilities. Trainers deliver content through lecture, PowerPoint, smart board, web quests, guest speakers, assessment task presentations and video underpinned by group discussions.learners communicating on course work using instant messaging systems such as Google Chat, Facebook chat, Twitter or SMSIndividual or group student support provided by a trainer using voice over internet tools such as Skype or Google ChatPhoto Credit http://www.flickr.com/photos/88758748@N00/3758519690/
  • Typical synchronous learning events facilitated online in a mature blended learning approach may include:Online workshop, tutorial or underpinning knowledge training program conducted online using a Virtual Classroom. Trainers deliver content through lecture, PowerPoint, share whiteboard, web quests, guest speakers, assessment task presentations and video underpinned by group discussions using inbuilt voice and text facilities. Trainers deliver content through lecture, PowerPoint, smart board, web quests, guest speakers, assessment task presentations and video underpinned by group discussions.learners communicating on course work using instant messaging systems such as Google Chat, Facebook chat, Twitter or SMSIndividual or group student support provided by a trainer using voice over internet tools such as Skype or Google ChatPhoto Credit http://www.flickr.com/photos/88758748@N00/3758519690/
  • During synchronous online tutorials, the absence of body language removes one critical cue a trainer relies upon in face-to-face classes to continually monitor understanding of and engagement with the course material. There can be a steep learning curve for some learners to confidently and comfortably contribute vocally to sessions. Good trainers overcome this by ensuring online sessions of no more than an hours duration that include a lively mix of lecture, brainstorming, group work (learners can be added to break out rooms in virtual classrooms), student presentation, polling, quizzing, video presentations, web tours and resource sharing.Online tutorials provide a peer review forum for:Group problem solving (Case Studies & Scenarios)BrainstormingAssessment task pitching for review assistance by peersRole plays for communication events encountered on the jobAssessment presentationsLets now look at Online Facilitated approaches using Asynchronous learning.
  • Course content is essentially resources to support the engagement with the problem solving process. When presenting a problem, “content” can be provided in a variety of forms using video, audio and some text:. This gives more depth to typical “quiz” based assessment which test memory rather than understanding, problem solving and consequences on the job of decision making.Some examples of engaging content includes:Video demonstration of a workplace process or communicationAn “Ask my Co Workers” audio presentation with suggestions on how to approach the task Specific learning materials to address the knowledge and skills central to the decision making treeThe Standard Operating Procedures that might apply to this process or communication Progression through the problem can be through a decision making tree. Present learners with situations with choices for dealing with the problem, with each choice leading to consequences and further choices. The process of finding the solutions to the problems is more important than the solutions themselves. These can be developed using rapid elearning software. These designs don't have to be overly complicated. Well-designed case studies, decision-making trees, problems or scenarios can create a need for the learners to pull the information. Developers and subject matter experts need to be guided by concepts of workplace character and narrative to present workplace problems as a series of stories that depict problems at work that need to be addressed using the available knowledge and skills demonstration models presented in the elearning resource. Practitioners who advocate this model of elearning content design include Cathy Moore and Tom Kuhlmann.Links to paste in for participants:Cathy Moore - http://blog.cathy-moore.com/Tom Kuhlmann - http://www.articulate.com/rapid-elearning/building-scenarios-for-e-learning/Photo Credit: http://www.flickr.com/photos/28430474@N05/4376443940/
  • Course content is essentially resources to support the engagement with the problem solving process. When presenting a problem, “content” can be provided in a variety of forms using video, audio and some text:. This gives more depth to typical “quiz” based assessment which test memory rather than understanding, problem solving and consequences on the job of decision making.Some examples of engaging content includes:Video demonstration of a workplace process or communicationAn “Ask my Co Workers” audio presentation with suggestions on how to approach the task Specific learning materials to address the knowledge and skills central to the decision making treeThe Standard Operating Procedures that might apply to this process or communication Progression through the problem can be through a decision making tree. Present learners with situations with choices for dealing with the problem, with each choice leading to consequences and further choices. The process of finding the solutions to the problems is more important than the solutions themselves. These can be developed using rapid elearning software. These designs don't have to be overly complicated. Well-designed case studies, decision-making trees, problems or scenarios can create a need for the learners to pull the information. Developers and subject matter experts need to be guided by concepts of workplace character and narrative to present workplace problems as a series of stories that depict problems at work that need to be addressed using the available knowledge and skills demonstration models presented in the elearning resource. Practitioners who advocate this model of elearning content design include Cathy Moore and Tom Kuhlmann.Links to paste in for participants:Cathy Moore - http://blog.cathy-moore.com/Tom Kuhlmann - http://www.articulate.com/rapid-elearning/building-scenarios-for-e-learning/Photo Credit: http://www.flickr.com/photos/28430474@N05/4376443940/
  • Course content is essentially resources to support the engagement with the problem solving process. When presenting a problem, “content” can be provided in a variety of forms using video, audio and some text:. This gives more depth to typical “quiz” based assessment which test memory rather than understanding, problem solving and consequences on the job of decision making.Some examples of engaging content includes:Video demonstration of a workplace process or communicationAn “Ask my Co Workers” audio presentation with suggestions on how to approach the task Specific learning materials to address the knowledge and skills central to the decision making treeThe Standard Operating Procedures that might apply to this process or communication Progression through the problem can be through a decision making tree. Present learners with situations with choices for dealing with the problem, with each choice leading to consequences and further choices. The process of finding the solutions to the problems is more important than the solutions themselves. These can be developed using rapid elearning software. These designs don't have to be overly complicated. Well-designed case studies, decision-making trees, problems or scenarios can create a need for the learners to pull the information. Developers and subject matter experts need to be guided by concepts of workplace character and narrative to present workplace problems as a series of stories that depict problems at work that need to be addressed using the available knowledge and skills demonstration models presented in the elearning resource. Practitioners who advocate this model of elearning content design include Cathy Moore and Tom Kuhlmann.Links to paste in for participants:Cathy Moore - http://blog.cathy-moore.com/Tom Kuhlmann - http://www.articulate.com/rapid-elearning/building-scenarios-for-e-learning/Photo Credit: http://www.flickr.com/photos/28430474@N05/4376443940/
  • Course content is essentially resources to support the engagement with the problem solving process. When presenting a problem, “content” can be provided in a variety of forms using video, audio and some text:. This gives more depth to typical “quiz” based assessment which test memory rather than understanding, problem solving and consequences on the job of decision making.Some examples of engaging content includes:Video demonstration of a workplace process or communicationAn “Ask my Co Workers” audio presentation with suggestions on how to approach the task Specific learning materials to address the knowledge and skills central to the decision making treeThe Standard Operating Procedures that might apply to this process or communication Progression through the problem can be through a decision making tree. Present learners with situations with choices for dealing with the problem, with each choice leading to consequences and further choices. The process of finding the solutions to the problems is more important than the solutions themselves. These can be developed using rapid elearning software. These designs don't have to be overly complicated. Well-designed case studies, decision-making trees, problems or scenarios can create a need for the learners to pull the information. Developers and subject matter experts need to be guided by concepts of workplace character and narrative to present workplace problems as a series of stories that depict problems at work that need to be addressed using the available knowledge and skills demonstration models presented in the elearning resource. Practitioners who advocate this model of elearning content design include Cathy Moore and Tom Kuhlmann.Links to paste in for participants:Cathy Moore - http://blog.cathy-moore.com/Tom Kuhlmann - http://www.articulate.com/rapid-elearning/building-scenarios-for-e-learning/Photo Credit: http://www.flickr.com/photos/28430474@N05/4376443940/
  • Typical asynchronous learning events in a mature blended learning approach may include: Discussion based activities accompanied by short readings or resources that elicit learners application of skills and knowledge to the workplace contextSharing of ideas and learning resources through discussion forum, social bookmarks or TwitterBlog or Wiki diary posts by learners to support work placement assessment, including participation and verification by third party or workplace assessorUse of social network tools such as social bookmarks, RSS Feeds, Blogs to collect and share electronic resourcesGroup work projects using combination of discussion forums, SMS, Blog or Wiki post, Google DocumentsPhoto Credit: http://www.flickr.com/photos/71088059@N00/3050204663/ 
  • Questions from the FloorProvide Links to ACPET PD Programhttp://www.acpet.edu.au/services/professional-development/ Victorian Providers remind of ementor program
  • Questions from the FloorProvide Links to ACPET PD Programhttp://www.acpet.edu.au/services/professional-development/ Victorian Providers remind of ementor program

Teaching and Learning in Webinars Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Online Facilitation Live, online and lively:
  • 2. Presenter – Michael Gwyther mick@yumstudio.com.au @mickgwyther http://www.facebook.com/michael.gwyther http://www.linkedin.com/profile/view?id=20201325 http://www.yumstudio.com.au http://www.yumstudio.com.au/footy
  • 3. Give me the pills I am starting to believe Sparks out of ears Hitting the wall Use the text tool to record your current mood state On top of the world
  • 4. Straw Poll A I regularly attended webinars B I attend webinars & teach in webinars C I have not been in a webinar
  • 5. What is your favourite webinar trick?
  • 6. How do you like to take questions from your learners?
  • 7. What tools are available to me?
  • 8. Online Facilitated Pedagogy • Synchronous • Asynchronous
  • 9. All I got to do is lecture…right?
  • 10. 7 is your friend…. • Don’t talk for more than 7 minutes • Punctuate your 7 minutes lecture/demo with participant activity
  • 11. Student Induction Technical Time Management Collaborative Organising Info
  • 12. Why use webinars?
  • 13. Blended Learning Choices Face to Face Self Paced Online Facilitated Content Skills Knowledge Activities Assessment
  • 14. Can you hear me?
  • 15. I’ve just got to take this call
  • 16. Oh you don’t have a microphone?
  • 17. Let’s brainstorm that
  • 18. Sorry I just talked over you…
  • 19. Has anyone seen Kathy? Oh she's dropped out….A G A I N
  • 20. Oh welcome Joe you’re only 10 minutes late……
  • 21. I’m channelling my inner DJ…
  • 22. Sorry I’m struggling to multitask…
  • 23. Damn I’ve still got 21 slides left…
  • 24. Online facilitated Pedagogy • Online workshops & tutorials • Assessment Task presentation • Group Work presentations & peer review • Learner support (one on one or Group) • Catch up with other learner groups
  • 25. Facilitated online examples • Group research projects • QnA of industry experts/past learners • Online lectures • Assessment task pitch & presentation • Peer Review of learners’ work • Role play • Software demonstration • Group problem solving • Remote trainee/third party assessor catch up • Assessment verification and moderation • RPL • Meetings • Supervision
  • 26. Some facilitation issues… • Who is listening actively? • How do I start on time? • How to deal with questions? • How will I present content? • How do I get learners working together? • What preparation is required? • Scripting V Dot points? • Where are my links, URLs, applications and opening and closing paragraphs?
  • 27. Facilitating - What are the challenges to you?
  • 28. During your presentation… • Slow things down – remember Lag! • Watch for responses • Practice, practice, practice • If you have a brain fog moment ask a question. • Divert so you can collect your thoughts • Encourage the use of emoticons for quick feedback • Pump up, stand up, smile, tell stories, project your voice!
  • 29. And in the end… • Follow up questions with info by email or phone call • Distribute whiteboard brainstorms • Distribute follow up resources/readings/videos • Forward recording link • Catch up with lurkers, quiet people etc • Get out in the sunshine
  • 30. Synchronous Infrastructure • Virtual Classrooms • Telephone & Video Conference Systems • VOIP (Skype, Lync) • Google Hangouts • Microsoft Lync • WizIQ • Adobe Connect • Blackboard Collaborate • GoToMeeting
  • 31. Facilitating – What types of activities can you use?
  • 32. Online facilitated Assessment • Body Language • Mix of activities in session • Peer Review • Assessment Presentations • Problem solving • Action learning
  • 33. • Develop a rubric with learners • Check for mapping • Distribute back to learners as marking guide • Rehearse the marking guide • Conduct presentations (summative) • Collect peer review • Redraft and resubmit • Share and assess Peer Review
  • 34. Webinar Preparation Good Practice Consider a pre webinar activity Pick and promote a title for your webinar that frames the educational objectives from your learners perspective. Make registration easy and remind participants 24 hours out Initially use a Moderator or Technology steward to support learners IT, deal with QnA and chat, running polls etc
  • 35. Webinar Preparation Good Practice Have a back up plan, computer, internet connection, headset and test them all in advance Keep SMS and or email contact of all participants handy for instant contact in the event your technology fails. Have a warm up activity to lead the presenter into the webinar
  • 36. Webinar Good Practice Keep lecturing to a minimum. Use the group to work through scenarios and problems. Promote discussion and the sharing of perspectives. Provide peer review opportunities for learners to feed back on each others projects, placements, issues at work etc. Give learners multiple ways of participating – voice, discussions, white board, brainstorming, break out rooms, polling, video as stimulus for discussion.
  • 37. During your presentation Slow things down – remember Lag! Watch for responses Practice, practice, practice If you have a brain fog moment ask a question. Divert so you can collect your thoughts Encourage the use of emoticons for quick feedback
  • 38. Any Questions?
  • 39. Thank you for playing