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Strategies for keeping the eLearner engaged
 

Strategies for keeping the eLearner engaged

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PowerPoint for session conducted for ACPET eLearning Public Workshops - "Strategies for keeping the eLearner engaged" by Michael Gwyther, yum productions

PowerPoint for session conducted for ACPET eLearning Public Workshops - "Strategies for keeping the eLearner engaged" by Michael Gwyther, yum productions

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  • User List Use the Emotions (thumps up and down, smiling, frowning) Polling Tools Using the Chat Window
  • What is a virtual classroom – common features and capabilities Using Case Studies, Problem Solving and Decision Making Trees Doing away with vast amounts of text – Incorporating Audio and Video into e Learning Free Tools to deliver e learning Using simple tools to produce great looking activities The art of writing thought provoking learning activities that challenge and engage
  • 1. Communicate information with no performance expectations. Information-based courses communicate new information but have no built-in expectations of changed performance. A good example is a course that highlights new features of a software application. You learn about the new the features but you aren’t required to do anything with this new information. 2. Give step-by-step instructions that have specific outcomes. These courses are focused on procedures and how to do something. They’re made up of repeatable tasks that are very close to what the learner will do at work. A good example is showing someone how to complete a worksheet or use software. 3. Share guidelines to help the learner solve problems. The most challenging courses to design are those where you teach principles or guidelines versus repeatable steps. You really have to understand the nuances of the learner’s situation and how the principles can be applied while respecting the fact that each application is somewhat unique.
  • Instead of creating an outline of content, start by asking, “How do we get the learners to pull this information?” Doesn’t have to be overly complicated. Well designed case studies or scenarios can create a need for the learners to pull the information You don’t even need to have big case studies. You can present some simple questions or problem-solving activities that require a solution. Essentially, you want to create a need for the information. Once the learner has a need, then they’re motivated to fulfill it. And that’s how you get the information to them.
  • Instead of creating an outline of content, start by asking, “How do we get the learners to pull this information?” Doesn’t have to be overly complicated. Well designed case studies or scenarios can create a need for the learners to pull the information You don’t even need to have big case studies. You can present some simple questions or problem-solving activities that require a solution. Essentially, you want to create a need for the information. Once the learner has a need, then they’re motivated to fulfill it. And that’s how you get the information to them.
  • Instead of creating an outline of content, start by asking, “How do we get the learners to pull this information?” Doesn’t have to be overly complicated. Well designed case studies or scenarios can create a need for the learners to pull the information You don’t even need to have big case studies. You can present some simple questions or problem-solving activities that require a solution. Essentially, you want to create a need for the information. Once the learner has a need, then they’re motivated to fulfill it. And that’s how you get the information to them.
  • Instead of creating an outline of content, start by asking, “How do we get the learners to pull this information?” Doesn’t have to be overly complicated. Well designed case studies or scenarios can create a need for the learners to pull the information You don’t even need to have big case studies. You can present some simple questions or problem-solving activities that require a solution. Essentially, you want to create a need for the information. Once the learner has a need, then they’re motivated to fulfill it. And that’s how you get the information to them.
  • Instead of creating an outline of content, start by asking, “How do we get the learners to pull this information?” Doesn’t have to be overly complicated. Well designed case studies or scenarios can create a need for the learners to pull the information You don’t even need to have big case studies. You can present some simple questions or problem-solving activities that require a solution. Essentially, you want to create a need for the information. Once the learner has a need, then they’re motivated to fulfill it. And that’s how you get the information to them.
  • Instead of creating an outline of content, start by asking, “How do we get the learners to pull this information?” Doesn’t have to be overly complicated. Well designed case studies or scenarios can create a need for the learners to pull the information You don’t even need to have big case studies. You can present some simple questions or problem-solving activities that require a solution. Essentially, you want to create a need for the information. Once the learner has a need, then they’re motivated to fulfill it. And that’s how you get the information to them.
  • Instead of creating an outline of content, start by asking, “How do we get the learners to pull this information?” Doesn’t have to be overly complicated. Well designed case studies or scenarios can create a need for the learners to pull the information You don’t even need to have big case studies. You can present some simple questions or problem-solving activities that require a solution. Essentially, you want to create a need for the information. Once the learner has a need, then they’re motivated to fulfill it. And that’s how you get the information to them.
  • Instead of creating an outline of content, start by asking, “How do we get the learners to pull this information?” Doesn’t have to be overly complicated. Well designed case studies or scenarios can create a need for the learners to pull the information You don’t even need to have big case studies. You can present some simple questions or problem-solving activities that require a solution. Essentially, you want to create a need for the information. Once the learner has a need, then they’re motivated to fulfill it. And that’s how you get the information to them.
  • Instead of creating an outline of content, start by asking, “How do we get the learners to pull this information?” Doesn’t have to be overly complicated. Well designed case studies or scenarios can create a need for the learners to pull the information You don’t even need to have big case studies. You can present some simple questions or problem-solving activities that require a solution. Essentially, you want to create a need for the information. Once the learner has a need, then they’re motivated to fulfill it. And that’s how you get the information to them.
  • Instead of creating an outline of content, start by asking, “How do we get the learners to pull this information?” Doesn’t have to be overly complicated. Well designed case studies or scenarios can create a need for the learners to pull the information You don’t even need to have big case studies. You can present some simple questions or problem-solving activities that require a solution. Essentially, you want to create a need for the information. Once the learner has a need, then they’re motivated to fulfill it. And that’s how you get the information to them.
  • Instead of creating an outline of content, start by asking, “How do we get the learners to pull this information?” Doesn’t have to be overly complicated. Well designed case studies or scenarios can create a need for the learners to pull the information You don’t even need to have big case studies. You can present some simple questions or problem-solving activities that require a solution. Essentially, you want to create a need for the information. Once the learner has a need, then they’re motivated to fulfill it. And that’s how you get the information to them.
  • Instead of creating an outline of content, start by asking, “How do we get the learners to pull this information?” Doesn’t have to be overly complicated. Well designed case studies or scenarios can create a need for the learners to pull the information You don’t even need to have big case studies. You can present some simple questions or problem-solving activities that require a solution. Essentially, you want to create a need for the information. Once the learner has a need, then they’re motivated to fulfill it. And that’s how you get the information to them.
  • Organise Content into Small Chunks • Build Upon Prior Knowledge. Create processes where the learner can practice using the information in a context that integrates it with prior experience. (Case studies and practices exercises are good because they can be structured to combine the new information with the learner’s current understanding.) • Provide Real-World Context. (Create exercises and real-world scenarios that help the learner apply the new information into a workplace context. Problem-solving scenarios help develop thinking skills that can be transferred to the working environment) • Focus on meaning and not information You don’t even need to have big case studies. You can present some simple questions or problem-solving activities that require a solution. Essentially, you want to create a need for the information. Once the learner has a need, then they’re motivated to fulfill it. And that’s how you get the information to them.
  • Organise Content into Small Chunks • Build Upon Prior Knowledge. Create processes where the learner can practice using the information in a context that integrates it with prior experience. (Case studies and practices exercises are good because they can be structured to combine the new information with the learner’s current understanding.) • Provide Real-World Context. (Create exercises and real-world scenarios that help the learner apply the new information into a workplace context. Problem-solving scenarios help develop thinking skills that can be transferred to the working environment) • Focus on meaning and not information You don’t even need to have big case studies. You can present some simple questions or problem-solving activities that require a solution. Essentially, you want to create a need for the information. Once the learner has a need, then they’re motivated to fulfill it. And that’s how you get the information to them.
  • Organise Content into Small Chunks • Build Upon Prior Knowledge. Create processes where the learner can practice using the information in a context that integrates it with prior experience. (Case studies and practices exercises are good because they can be structured to combine the new information with the learner’s current understanding.) • Provide Real-World Context. (Create exercises and real-world scenarios that help the learner apply the new information into a workplace context. Problem-solving scenarios help develop thinking skills that can be transferred to the working environment) • Focus on meaning and not information You don’t even need to have big case studies. You can present some simple questions or problem-solving activities that require a solution. Essentially, you want to create a need for the information. Once the learner has a need, then they’re motivated to fulfill it. And that’s how you get the information to them.
  • http://c4lpt.co.uk/handbook/state.html
  • Instead of creating an outline of content, start by asking, “How do we get the learners to pull this information?” Doesn’t have to be overly complicated. Well designed case studies or scenarios can create a need for the learners to pull the information You don’t even need to have big case studies. You can present some simple questions or problem-solving activities that require a solution. Essentially, you want to create a need for the information. Once the learner has a need, then they’re motivated to fulfill it. And that’s how you get the information to them.
  • Instead of creating an outline of content, start by asking, “How do we get the learners to pull this information?” Doesn’t have to be overly complicated. Well designed case studies or scenarios can create a need for the learners to pull the information You don’t even need to have big case studies. You can present some simple questions or problem-solving activities that require a solution. Essentially, you want to create a need for the information. Once the learner has a need, then they’re motivated to fulfill it. And that’s how you get the information to them.
  • Instead of creating an outline of content, start by asking, “How do we get the learners to pull this information?” Doesn’t have to be overly complicated. Well designed case studies or scenarios can create a need for the learners to pull the information You don’t even need to have big case studies. You can present some simple questions or problem-solving activities that require a solution. Essentially, you want to create a need for the information. Once the learner has a need, then they’re motivated to fulfill it. And that’s how you get the information to them.

Strategies for keeping the eLearner engaged Strategies for keeping the eLearner engaged Presentation Transcript

  • ACPET Vic Govt Elearning e Learning Strategies to keep the Learner Engaged ACPET Public Workshop Series
  • ACPET Vic Govt Elearning
    • ACPET Public Workshop Series
    • RTO e Learning mentor program
    • Funding Briefings
  • ACPET Vic Govt Elearning
    • Welcome to Elluminate
    • Features and Tools
  • Today’s Agenda
    • Virtual Classrooms
    • Using Case Studies, Problem Solving and Decision Making Trees
    • Incorporating Audio and Video into e learning
    • Web 2
    • Free Tools
    • Art of Writing
  • State of Play
    • Totally online courses
    • Blended solutions with a mix of face-to-face and online elements
    • Learning management systems that manage students' learning
    • web conferencing systems, which support the delivery of scheduled online sessions
    • Informal learning using social networking
  • Burning Questions
    • Do you use eLearning currently?
    • A No
    • B Yes – self paced learning
    • C Yes – Blended Learning
    • D Yes – Virtual Classrooms
  • Burning Questions
    • I use the following in my training
    • A Video
    • B Group Work/Collaboration
    • C Problem Solving/Case Studies
    • D Non Paper submissions
  • Fully Online Knowledge Preparation for F2F Skills Workshop Blended – Mix of online & F2F Skill recognition/currency/RPL Skills update on demand Collaborative Learning with Peers Potential Models
  • Model for e Learning Knowledge/Skills Industry Knowledge Staff Capacity Compliance eLearning Training Tools Collaboration Authentic Tasks Trainer/Learner Communication Model Self Paced eLearning Platform Structured
  • Purpose
    • Most e learning courses purpose is to share information or change/improve job role performance. However, most courses focuses on sharing information rather than performance improvements. This happens because most people focus on delivering content rather than on changing job role performance .
  • Passive Learning
    • Slabs of Text
    • Multiple Choice Questions
    • Few opportunities to apply knowledge
    • Can’t learn from others
    • Poor demonstration of skills
    • Inadequate follow up with face to face assessment/further training
    • High drop out rate/low engagement
  • How do you engage your learners?
  • Text Text Text!
    • Bad eLearning is text heavy
    • Reading is best done offline . Many elearning courses require a lot of reading. If most of your course is text-based, find a solution that best supports reading rather than building a course
  • All shapes & sizes
    • Learners exhibit a variety of learning styles, Computer literacy & attitudes to learning preferences
    • Have a Goers
    • Reflectors
    • Watchers
    • Listeners
  • Cater for them
    • Reduce reliance on text thru multimedia (Audio, Visuals, Video)
    • Engage learner to think through online material (learning activities)
    • Assess the sharing of perspectives
    • Put back industry knowledge
  • Push or Pull?
  • Push or Pull?
  • Push or Pull?
  • Push or Pull?
    • “ How do we get the learners to pull this information?”
    • Well designed case studies or scenarios can create a need for the learners to pull the information
    • You can present some simple questions or problem-solving activities that require a solution.
  • Case Studies Examples of real life scenarios for problem solving and decision making to present the learner with a situation that they may one day encounter in their normal work practice
  • Decision Making Trees Present learners with situations with choices for dealing with the problem, with each choice leading to consequences and further choices The process of finding the solutions to the problems is more important than the solutions themselves.
  • Decision Making Trees Learners can investigate the possible outcomes of choosing those options. They help the learner to form a balanced picture of the risks and outcomes associated with each possible course of action.
  • Decision Making Trees
  • Problem Based Learning Learners to solve "authentic" problems by the process of continually encountering the type of ill-structured problems typically confronted by workers and practicing professionals The process of finding the solutions to the problems is more important than the solutions themselves
  • Role Plays
    • Assume an identity, research their views and play the game in character to solve problems and explore issues
    • Present the learner with a situation that they may one day encounter in their normal work practice a simulated environment allows learners to consider authentic situations in a safe environment.
    • Learners are involved in engaging and experiential learning.
  • Using Video
    • stimulus material for accompanying activities (quiz, case study, DMT etc)
    • provide extra material for self-paced learning
    • share video recordings of guest speakers from remote locations
    • provide interviews with subject experts or industry figures
    • support learners with literacy and/or other learning difficulties
  • Using Video
    • as instructional training material for trades
    • provide third party content on relevant subject areas (YouTube, teacher tube, industry specific sites)
    • support to walking tours of workplaces for training induction or specific instruction.
    • Assessment Tool
  • Video Sources
    • YouTube
    • Vimeo
    • Teacher Tube
    • Create your own!
      • Bloggie
      • Flip Video
    • Capture tools
    • NetVideoHunter
  • Using Audio
    • self-paced learning
    • guest speakers from remote locations
    • subject experts or industry figures
    • a assessment tool
    • third party content
    • walking tours for induction / instruction
    • case studies/scenarios
    • vocabulary
  • Lets Try It
  • Engaging e Learning
    • Organise Content into Small Chunks
    • Build Upon Prior Knowledge.
    • Create processes where the learner can practice using the information in a context that integrates it with prior experience.
    • Provide Real-World Context.
    • Focus on meaning and not information
  • Engaging e Learning
  • Industry Knowledge
    • Industry experts (audio/video)
    • Discussion forums
    • Group Work
    • Action Learning Sets (finding solutions to workplace issues)
    • Using Social Media to follow Industry events/conferences
    • Learners creating reports in variety of formats
  • Web 2.0 tools
  • State of Workplace Learning “ The emergence of social media, has, recently begun to be used as a way of  further engaging online and classroom learners, and developing communities of learners (Stage 4).  We have also seen the emergence of social learning systems focused on supporting (and managing) the use of social and collaboration activities in the formal learning.” http://c4lpt.co.uk/handbook/state.html Jane Hart Centre for Learning and Performance Technologies (C4LPT)
  • Using Web Tools
    • Tap into the learner’s motivation.
    • Have the learners do something with the information that you give them.
    • Ask learners how the course content is relevant.
    • Confirm that the scenarios are accurate and realistic
    • Use of Text with Images, Slideshows, PowerPoint presentations, Video and Audio
  • Engaging e Learning
    • Tap into the learner’s motivation.
    • Have the learners do something with the information that you give them.
    • Ask learners how the course content is relevant.
    • Confirm that the scenarios are accurate and realistic
    • Use of Text with Images, Slideshows, PowerPoint presentations, Video and Audio
  • Engaging e Learning
    • Get the learners to create the learning materials: -video -audio -quiz questions -decision making trees -product manuals/resources
  • Challenges
    • Technology
    • Strategies to train
    • Writing Skills
    • Facilitation
  • Writing Skills
    • Writing tasks to reflect realistic processes and environments as well as simply defining the tasks to be undertaken between the learners themselves and enable them to be responsible for them is crucial.
  • Writing Skills
    • Characters
    • Environment
    • Challenge
    • Choices
    • Consequences
    • Supporting Information
    • Resources
  • Tools to create
    • ARED
    • PowerPoint
    • Articulate
    • LMS Tools – for example the Lesson Activity in Moodle
    • Adobe Captivate
    • Blog/Wiki
  • Resources
    • Gallery of e learning strategies http://designing.flexiblelearning.net.au/gallery/all.htm
    • Australian Flexible Learning Framework http://www.flexiblelearning.net.au/
    • Jane Hart http://www.c4lpt.co.uk/jane.html
    • Sue Waters http://aquaculturepda.wikispaces.com/
    • The Rapid eLearning Blog http://www.articulate.com/rapid-elearning/
  • E Learning Planning
    • Use a Learning Management System (LMS) to track and communicate with learners and to retrieve assessment tasks
    • Determine delivery mode – Self Paced, Structured Group Work, Collaboration.
    • Establish communication tools to underpin this (Discussion forums, virtual classrooms etc)
    • Response time for support
    • Involve trainers in PD and training model
    • Induct Learners
    • Help Desk services and training support
    • Training online is different. Use a Mentor/Team Trainers and immerse trainers in online learning methods via PD
    • Involve your training team in designing your delivery (IT staff, Admin, Managers, Trainers, Students, Consultants)
    • Redesign your delivery plan to reflect your current training strengths and strategies for the online environment
    • Participate in the ACPET mentor program to build skills in implementing e learning
    • Use less text, provide case studies, scenarios and problem based learning
    • Plan well in advance and immerse staff in customisation and facilitation skills
    E Learning Planning
    • Any Questions?
    • [email_address]
    • michael.gwyther@yum.vic.edu.au
    E Thank You