rapid eLearning 1              Photo Credit: http://www.flickr.com/photos/25691430@N04/4347819911/                        ...
Design Choices                                           Online             Face to Face   Self Paced                     ...
What is rapid eLearning? rapid creation of courseware by       Simplepeople who are less experienced      Assessmentwith c...
But what is the biggest challenge?
Self Pace Best PracticeGive learners something to do with the content. Even if yourcourse is info heavy, provide opportuni...
Making sense out of the tough stuff
Story based self paced contentCharacter faces a challenge/journeyShow not tellMake learners justify their choices. Challen...
Stories – a narrative processCharacter                WorkerSetting                  WorkplaceDisruption               Pro...
Meet Sandro
He’s hopeless! Can we reform him?
Maybe not…
Call the professionals!
Self Paced Content Examples                        Photo Credit: http://www.flickr.com/photos/43716015@N00/5381002934/    ...
The Photocopier is on fire!
Council Community Video
Compliance
Social Media
Cultural Awareness
Information
Information and Activities
Activity 1 – Decision Making•Define the context of your scenario. What areyour narrative elements for:  •Narrative Element...
Types of Content “Context”• Textbook or “Reference” style  (job aids, online support or help)  Static – Just in Time• Cour...
Types of ActivitiesInformationDemonstrationCase StudyScenarioDecision Making TreeKnowledge checkingProblem based Learning
Self Paced Content examplesCompliance testingCommunication scenariosApplication of policy & procedure decision making tree...
Content Creation Methods
Features of rapid eLearning tools                          Photo Credit: http://www.flickr.com/photos/23322134@N02/3289956...
AssessmentQuizzesDecisionmaking TreesShort answer
Assessment      Direct          Indirect demonstration        Productsdemonstration/obser         Products           Quest...
What to do with this darn content?•Run off computer in training room•Add to your intranet•Burn to CD or USB•Upload to your...
Output of rapid eLearning toolsFlashHTMLHTML5WordSCORM
SCORMThe SCORM standard makessure that all e-learning contentand LMSs can work with each other:
Tin Can          http://tincanapi.com/overview/
What is your itch?                     Photo Credit: http://www.flickr.com/photos/7149027@N07/6066027411                  ...
Approaches to engaging content                        Photo Credit: http://www.flickr.com/photos/42314813@N02/5527368292/ ...
Onscreen Text•   What information is best presented as on-screen    text?•   How much is too much? Remember, learners    t...
Storyboarding•   A course outline or storyboard will help you to    organize both the course content and your thoughts    ...
Storyboarding Example
Understanding Multimedia                           Photo Credit: http://www.flickr.com/photos/7149027@N07/6066027411      ...
Integrating AudioQualityCompressionControl the EnvironmentProfessional voices V AmateursMusic & Sound EffectsPros & Cons o...
Mixing AudioIn toolAudacity
Stock Music & FXhttp://www.freesound.org/http://opsound.org/http://librivox.org/http://www.opensourcemusic.com/http://ccmi...
Voice 123            http://voice123.com/
Integrating VideoBandwidthShortDo record demos but not your F2F classLighting & BackgroundQualityCamera (Smartphones & Tab...
Mixing VideoIn TooliMovie (Mac, iPhone & iPad)Adobe Premiere Elements (PC & Mac)Camtasia
Integrating images - sources     http://compfight.com   http://openclipart.org/
Mixing imagesIn toolPicasaPaint.Net
Creative CommonsCreative Commons is a nonprofit thatoffers flexible copyright managementtools for creative work.Offering y...
Creative Commons Licenses    Attribution - This applies to every Creative Commons    work. Whenever a work is copied or re...
Creative Commons Licenses                http://youtu.be/1DKm96Ftfko
Creative Commons LinksFlickr Creative Commons – http://www.flickr.com/creativecommons/Open Source Music - http://www.opens...
Good Rapid eLearning is….
Moodle Lesson
Moodle Lesson       http://youtu.be/nq3das503-Q
Activity•Develop a responsive learning activity usingMoodle’s Lesson  -Simple choice  -Quiz  -Content Choices
Pull not Push         http://www.articulate.com/rapid-elearning/are-your-e-learning-courses-pushed-or-pulled/
Pull not Push         http://www.articulate.com/rapid-elearning/are-your-e-learning-courses-pushed-or-pulled/
Pull not Push         http://www.articulate.com/rapid-elearning/are-your-e-learning-courses-pushed-or-pulled/
Decision making trees •Present learners with situations with choices for dealing with the problem, with each choice leadin...
Decision making trees   http://www.articulate.com/rapid-elearning/are-your-e-learning-courses-pushed-or-pulled/    http://...
Activity•Draft a Decision making tree•Use short sentences or single words•Create a problem for the learner to solve•2 bran...
Activity•Create a simple interactive PowerPoint
PowerPoint, iSpring & simple interactivity                       Photo Credit: http://www.flickr.com/photos/68278595@N00/7...
Activity – PowerPointBuilding interaction between slidesAdding Audio & VideoTiming EffectsExport out to iSpringAdd to LMS ...
Cathy Moore              http://blog.cathy-moore.com/
Rapid E-learning Blog                        http://www.articulate.com/rapid-eLearning/
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Rapid eLearning

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Rapid eLearning Session PowerPoint for ACPET ementor program Registered Training Organisation RTOs

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  • The Rapid E-Learning category is defined by the following criteria… * Courseware which can be developed in less than three weeks * Subject Matter Experts (SMEs) act as the primary resource for development * A well-known tool (e.g. PowerPoint) or user-friendly templates form the starting point for courseware * Simple assessment, feedback and tracking are usually provided * Media elements which enhance learning but do not create technology barriers may be included (e.g. voice) * Learning modules can be taken in one hour or less, often in less than 30 minutes. Synchronous (scheduled or live) and asynchronous (self-paced) models may be utilized. Jennifer De Vries http://www.bluestreaklearning.com/
  • What is the biggest challenge in creating content?
  • Keeping content brief, visual and relatable
  • Keeping content brief, visual and relatable
  • "Reference" is static content - meaning no interaction other than allowing the user to link from page-to-page and to search. It is asynchronous. It is normally a series of web pages, but can be PDF or other document types. It can be created using Wiki software, a content management system, web editing software or even Microsoft Word stored as HTML. It's designed to provide either real-time support for work tasks or near real-time support for look up. Often they are designed based around particular job functions and tasks to provide good on-the-job support. Reference includes "job aids" or "online support" or "online help" or various other things. Each of these other terms in slightly more specific than "reference" as they generally imply a bit more about the specific structure of the content. Thus, "reference" to me is a good umbrella term. Courseware implies pages of course content (information, multimedia) broken up with quizzes, case studies or scenarios. Usually takes a neutral tone. "Rapid Content Creation" or "Just-in-Time.” Workplace – we are either given a role in a workplace scenario and led through case studies by a workplace mentor or supervisor either passively or actively engaged in workplace scenarios or decision making trees.) http://elearningtech.blogspot.com.au/2006/05/shift-in-eLearning-from-pure.html Information Demonstration Case Study Scenario Decision Making Tree Knowledge checking Problem based Learning
  • "Reference" is static content - meaning no interaction other than allowing the user to link from page-to-page and to search. It is asynchronous. It is normally a series of web pages, but can be PDF or other document types. It can be created using Wiki software, a content management system, web editing software or even Microsoft Word stored as HTML. It's designed to provide either real-time support for work tasks or near real-time support for look up. Often they are designed based around particular job functions and tasks to provide good on-the-job support. Reference includes "job aids" or "online support" or "online help" or various other things. Each of these other terms in slightly more specific than "reference" as they generally imply a bit more about the specific structure of the content. Thus, "reference" to me is a good umbrella term. Courseware implies pages of course content (information, multimedia) broken up with quizzes, case studies or scenarios. Usually takes a neutral tone. "Rapid Content Creation" or "Just-in-Time.” Workplace – we are either given a role in a workplace scenario and led through case studies by a workplace mentor or supervisor either passively or actively engaged in workplace scenarios or decision making trees.) http://elearningtech.blogspot.com.au/2006/05/shift-in-eLearning-from-pure.html Information Demonstration Case Study Scenario Decision Making Tree Knowledge checking Problem based Learning
  • Quizzes may be scored, enabling direct marking automatically into the Learner Management System’s grading.
  • http://tincanapi.com/scorm-vs-the-tin-can-api/
  • Previous specifications were difficult and had limitations (see Tin Can vs SCORM), but the Tin Can API is simple and flexible. It lifts many of the older restrictions. Mobile learning, simulations, virtual worlds, serious games, real-world activities, experiential learning, social learning, offline learning, and collaborative learning are just some of the things that can now be recognized and communicated well with the Tin Can API. It’s important to know that we don’t own the Tin Can API. ADL is the steward of the specification. We just know this space so well that ADL asked us to help develop it. The Tin Can API is community-driven, and free to implement. How does the Tin Can API work? People learn from interactions with other people, content, and beyond. These actions can happen anywhere and signal an event where learning could occur. All of these can be recorded with the Tin Can API. When an activity needs to be recorded, the application sends secure statements in the form of “Noun, verb, object” or “I did this” to a Learning Record Store (LRS.) Learning Record Stores record all of the statements made. An LRS can share these statements with other LRSs. An LRS can exist on its own, or inside an LMS. The freedoms of the Tin Can API Statement freedom:  the structure of “statements” using nouns, verbs and objects lets you us record almost any activity. Think: “I did this.” History freedom:  the Tin Can API allows LRSs to talk to each other. LRSs can share data and transcripts with one another, and your experiences can follow you from one LRS (or organization) to another. Learners can even have their own “personal data lockers” with their personal learning information inside them. Device freedom:  any enabled device can send Tin Can API statements (mobile phones, simulations, games, a CPR dummy, the list goes on). A constant network connection isn’t necessary — occasional connectivity is fine. Workflow freedom:  tracking learning events doesn’t have to start or end in an LMS, it can start wherever the learner is and on whatever device they choose to use. Your content isn’t tied to an LMS.
  • You’ll find a card by your side “ Write down the one biggest thing you would like to understand by the end of today” Take a minute or two to complete
  • 1. Writing On-Screen Text Summary: Most readers only skim online text so keep it lively and relative to the learner. Don’t kill the learner with continuous bullet points. Comment: True, learners don’t read all of the text. This is why it’s so important to add nice visual design to your course. You need to “draw” learners in and help them “want” to engage with your course. You should also think about chunking content. 2. Writing Audio Scripts Summary: Find that “hook” that sparks the learner’s imagination. The sounds of words and cadence of phrases in the script is important. Be sure to choose your voice talent carefully. Comment: You also need to find a balance between what content should be narrated and what content you should let the learner read. Also, there are many times when the learner can read faster than the audio narration. How will you handle this? Can a learner turn off the audio? Can they advance to the next section when the audio narration is still playing? 3. Writing Video Scripts Summary: Remember that video is for showing, not telling. Comment: Video should be used to demonstrate key concepts in the learning. Here is a sample video tutorial we have built to demonstrate how to add a Glossary to an Articulate Skin. 4. Technical Writing Summary: Technical writing can be dull and dry…so find a way to inject creativity into your course. Comment: Scenarios can be a great way to spice this up. Start off with a problem and then show the steps to fix it. 5. Writing Stories Summary: Storytelling incorporates facts and concepts learned, and should contain characters that the learners can identify with. Comment: When building a course with various stories to tie them all together. Always focus on the same characters throughout the entire course…this allows the learners to keep building on concepts already learned. 6. Writing Test Questions Summary: All test questions must correspond to the learning objectives in the course. Give yourself enough time to write effective test questions. Comment: Many instructional design models have you write the test question very early in your design process. The problem is that many of us build the entire course and then say “oops, I forgot to create the test.” Then we hurry and create some questions and throw them out there. 7. Writing Glossary Definitions Summary: The 4 tips for writing glossary definitions are: 1) every word counts, 2) remove extraneous words, 3) use a consistent style for every definition, and 4) let someone else edit them. 8. Writing Interactions Summary: Interactions can be a powerful learning tool…but they must be well written with good instructions. 9. Writing Microcopy Summary: Microcopy is the little instructions and phrases used in eLearning and should not be an afterthought. Comment: I like to add text to my image treatments as well. Any image can be combined with text. 10. Copywriting Summary: Copywriting is the use of persuasive language to entice someone to take your training. Most copywriters follow the AIDA formula when writing copy.
  • Why is it important to create a course outline or storyboard before building an eLearning course? A course outline or storyboard will help you to organize both the course content and your thoughts on interactivity (audio, video, graphics, interactions, etc.). Here are a few things to consider when building your storyboard: On-Screen text What information is best presented as on-screen text? How much is too much? Remember, learners typically only scan the on-screen text. Audio Scripting Will or should you use audio in your course? If you decide to use it, be consistent throughout the course. If using audio, will you also include written scripting for the leaner to read? Can the learner advance through the course even if the audio is still playing? Do the learners have audio capabilities? Will they use headsets/earbuds? Do they have speakers for their computers? Interactions/Quizzes Will you add interactions/quizzes to your course? Interactions/quizzes should support the learning process and not distract from it. Use interactions to reinforce learning content. Graphics/Images Do not use gratuitous images. The images in your course must support the story you are telling. Most learners only scan over the text so your graphics need to help tell the story. Can the text be combined into the image? Video Is video a good delivery method for the content being presented? What information is best presented in video format? Do you have the time and budget for video? Can your network handle video? Course Test Is a course test required? If so, plan for the test in the storyboard process. This allows you to build test questions when you build the course objectives. The course test should not be an afterthought once the course is created. Printable Reference Materials Does the learner need printable reference materials to refer to while completing the training or after the training? Maybe offer a training recap. Website Links Can you link the learner off to a website to learn more about the topic? Development Notes Include additional development/design notes.
  • Why is it important to create a course outline or storyboard before building an eLearning course? A course outline or storyboard will help you to organize both the course content and your thoughts on interactivity (audio, video, graphics, interactions, etc.). Here are a few things to consider when building your storyboard: On-Screen text What information is best presented as on-screen text? How much is too much? Remember, learners typically only scan the on-screen text. Audio Scripting Will or should you use audio in your course? If you decide to use it, be consistent throughout the course. If using audio, will you also include written scripting for the leaner to read? Can the learner advance through the course even if the audio is still playing? Do the learners have audio capabilities? Will they use headsets/earbuds? Do they have speakers for their computers? Interactions/Quizzes Will you add interactions/quizzes to your course? Interactions/quizzes should support the learning process and not distract from it. Use interactions to reinforce learning content. Graphics/Images Do not use gratuitous images. The images in your course must support the story you are telling. Most learners only scan over the text so your graphics need to help tell the story. Can the text be combined into the image? Video Is video a good delivery method for the content being presented? What information is best presented in video format? Do you have the time and budget for video? Can your network handle video? Course Test Is a course test required? If so, plan for the test in the storyboard process. This allows you to build test questions when you build the course objectives. The course test should not be an afterthought once the course is created. Printable Reference Materials Does the learner need printable reference materials to refer to while completing the training or after the training? Maybe offer a training recap. Website Links Can you link the learner off to a website to learn more about the topic? Development Notes Include additional development/design notes.
  • Quizzes may be scored, enabling
  • Quizzes may be scored, enabling
  • Also Sound Cloud for Music
  • You submit a script and have narrators bid for your work, and they in turn will post samples in response. You simply hire your choice online, and the turnaround time is usually only a few days. You get a very professional final product that can save you dozens of hours at a very competitive price.
  • Brainstorm Activity – What are some good principles of rapid eLearning: Suggested List
  • The lesson module presents a series of HTML pages to the student who is usually asked to make some sort of choice underneath the content area. The choice will send them to a specific page in the Lesson. In a Lesson page's simplest form, the student can select a continue button at the bottom of the page, which will send them to the next page in the Lesson. There are 2 basic Lesson page types that the student will see: question pages and content pages. There are also several advanced navigational pages which can meet more specialized needs of the Teacher. The Lesson module was designed to be adaptive and to use a student's choices to create a self directed lesson. The main difference between a Lesson and other activity modules available in Moodle comes from its adaptive ability. With this tool, each choice the students makes can show a different teacher response/comment and send the student to a different page in the lesson. Thus with planning, the Lesson module can customize the presentation of content and questions to each student with no further action required by the teacher.
  • The lesson module presents a series of HTML pages to the student who is usually asked to make some sort of choice underneath the content area. The choice will send them to a specific page in the Lesson. In a Lesson page's simplest form, the student can select a continue button at the bottom of the page, which will send them to the next page in the Lesson. There are 2 basic Lesson page types that the student will see: question pages and content pages. There are also several advanced navigational pages which can meet more specialized needs of the Teacher. The Lesson module was designed to be adaptive and to use a student's choices to create a self directed lesson. The main difference between a Lesson and other activity modules available in Moodle comes from its adaptive ability. With this tool, each choice the students makes can show a different teacher response/comment and send the student to a different page in the lesson. Thus with planning, the Lesson module can customize the presentation of content and questions to each student with no further action required by the teacher.
  • Rapid eLearning

    1. 1. rapid eLearning 1 Photo Credit: http://www.flickr.com/photos/25691430@N04/4347819911/ CC: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/
    2. 2. Design Choices Online Face to Face Self Paced FacilitatedContent ✔ ✔Activities ✔ ✔Assessment ✔ ✔
    3. 3. What is rapid eLearning? rapid creation of courseware by Simplepeople who are less experienced Assessmentwith courseware developmentparticularly subject matterexperts Multimedia Courseware Templates Short Learning Modules
    4. 4. But what is the biggest challenge?
    5. 5. Self Pace Best PracticeGive learners something to do with the content. Even if yourcourse is info heavy, provide opportunities to apply learning toworkplace context in the role they will occupy.When presenting a problem, “content” can be provided in avariety of forms using video, audio and some text.This gives more depth to typical “quiz” based assessmentwhich test memory rather than understanding, problemsolving and consequences of on the job of decision making.
    6. 6. Making sense out of the tough stuff
    7. 7. Story based self paced contentCharacter faces a challenge/journeyShow not tellMake learners justify their choices. Challenge theirassumptions and make them think deeply about thematerial.Contextual feedback will help learners see where theywent wrong
    8. 8. Stories – a narrative processCharacter WorkerSetting WorkplaceDisruption Problem/SkillSolving the disruption Asking/Reading/Policy CommunicationResolution Learnt the skill
    9. 9. Meet Sandro
    10. 10. He’s hopeless! Can we reform him?
    11. 11. Maybe not…
    12. 12. Call the professionals!
    13. 13. Self Paced Content Examples Photo Credit: http://www.flickr.com/photos/43716015@N00/5381002934/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/2.0/
    14. 14. The Photocopier is on fire!
    15. 15. Council Community Video
    16. 16. Compliance
    17. 17. Social Media
    18. 18. Cultural Awareness
    19. 19. Information
    20. 20. Information and Activities
    21. 21. Activity 1 – Decision Making•Define the context of your scenario. What areyour narrative elements for: •Narrative Elements •Character •Setting •Disruption •Solving the disruption •Resolution
    22. 22. Types of Content “Context”• Textbook or “Reference” style (job aids, online support or help) Static – Just in Time• Courseware (Content & simple assessment)• Workplace /Interactive (case study/scenario/decision making tree) Interactive
    23. 23. Types of ActivitiesInformationDemonstrationCase StudyScenarioDecision Making TreeKnowledge checkingProblem based Learning
    24. 24. Self Paced Content examplesCompliance testingCommunication scenariosApplication of policy & procedure decision making treesCourse ContentAssessment tasks and associated guidedreadings/resources/multimedia
    25. 25. Content Creation Methods
    26. 26. Features of rapid eLearning tools Photo Credit: http://www.flickr.com/photos/23322134@N02/3289956770/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0//
    27. 27. AssessmentQuizzesDecisionmaking TreesShort answer
    28. 28. Assessment Direct Indirect demonstration Productsdemonstration/obser Products Questions - written vation and oral Workplace documents Indirect Assignments Assignments demonstration Third party reports Third party reports Products Workplace Self-assessment documents SimulationQuestions - written Portfolios and oral AssignmentsThird party reports Self-assessment Simulation
    29. 29. What to do with this darn content?•Run off computer in training room•Add to your intranet•Burn to CD or USB•Upload to your LMS either via •SCORM (zip) or, •File (and link to the first page.)
    30. 30. Output of rapid eLearning toolsFlashHTMLHTML5WordSCORM
    31. 31. SCORMThe SCORM standard makessure that all e-learning contentand LMSs can work with each other:
    32. 32. Tin Can http://tincanapi.com/overview/
    33. 33. What is your itch? Photo Credit: http://www.flickr.com/photos/7149027@N07/6066027411 CC: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/2.0/
    34. 34. Approaches to engaging content Photo Credit: http://www.flickr.com/photos/42314813@N02/5527368292/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/2.0/
    35. 35. Onscreen Text• What information is best presented as on-screen text?• How much is too much? Remember, learners typically only scan the on-screen text.
    36. 36. Storyboarding• A course outline or storyboard will help you to organize both the course content and your thoughts on interactivity. • Onscreen Text • Audio Scripting • Interactions/Quizzes • Graphics/Images • Video • References & Weblinks • Development Notes
    37. 37. Storyboarding Example
    38. 38. Understanding Multimedia Photo Credit: http://www.flickr.com/photos/7149027@N07/6066027411 CC: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/2.0/
    39. 39. Integrating AudioQualityCompressionControl the EnvironmentProfessional voices V AmateursMusic & Sound EffectsPros & Cons of “Script Reading”WAV & MP3
    40. 40. Mixing AudioIn toolAudacity
    41. 41. Stock Music & FXhttp://www.freesound.org/http://opsound.org/http://librivox.org/http://www.opensourcemusic.com/http://ccmixter.org/http://www.flashkit.com/loops/
    42. 42. Voice 123 http://voice123.com/
    43. 43. Integrating VideoBandwidthShortDo record demos but not your F2F classLighting & BackgroundQualityCamera (Smartphones & Tablets)Use a VoiceoverRule of Thirds
    44. 44. Mixing VideoIn TooliMovie (Mac, iPhone & iPad)Adobe Premiere Elements (PC & Mac)Camtasia
    45. 45. Integrating images - sources http://compfight.com http://openclipart.org/
    46. 46. Mixing imagesIn toolPicasaPaint.Net
    47. 47. Creative CommonsCreative Commons is a nonprofit thatoffers flexible copyright managementtools for creative work.Offering your work under a CreativeCommons license does not meangiving up your copyright. It meansoffering some of your rights to anytaker, and only on certain conditions.
    48. 48. Creative Commons Licenses Attribution - This applies to every Creative Commons work. Whenever a work is copied or redistributed under a Creative Commons license, credit must always be given to the creator. Non commercial - Lets others copy, distribute, display, and perform your work — and derivative works based upon it — but for noncommercial purposes only. No Derivative Works - Lets others copy, distribute, display, and perform only verbatim copies of your work, not derivative works based upon it. Share Alike - Allows others to distribute derivative works only under a license identical to the license that governs your work.
    49. 49. Creative Commons Licenses http://youtu.be/1DKm96Ftfko
    50. 50. Creative Commons LinksFlickr Creative Commons – http://www.flickr.com/creativecommons/Open Source Music - http://www.opensourcemusic.com/Wikimedia Commons - http://commons.wikimedia.org/Yahoo Creative Commons Search Toolhttp://search.yahoo.com/ccDesigning and implementing eLearning with Creative Commons(Australian Flexible Learning Framework)http://designing.flexiblelearning.net.au/gallery/activities/creative_commons.htmCreative Commons information Australia – http://creativecommons.org.au Creative Commons (Global) – http://creativecommons.org/
    51. 51. Good Rapid eLearning is….
    52. 52. Moodle Lesson
    53. 53. Moodle Lesson http://youtu.be/nq3das503-Q
    54. 54. Activity•Develop a responsive learning activity usingMoodle’s Lesson -Simple choice -Quiz -Content Choices
    55. 55. Pull not Push http://www.articulate.com/rapid-elearning/are-your-e-learning-courses-pushed-or-pulled/
    56. 56. Pull not Push http://www.articulate.com/rapid-elearning/are-your-e-learning-courses-pushed-or-pulled/
    57. 57. Pull not Push http://www.articulate.com/rapid-elearning/are-your-e-learning-courses-pushed-or-pulled/
    58. 58. Decision making trees •Present learners with situations with choices for dealing with the problem, with each choice leading to consequences and further choices •The process of finding the solutions to the problems is more important than the solutions themselves.
    59. 59. Decision making trees http://www.articulate.com/rapid-elearning/are-your-e-learning-courses-pushed-or-pulled/ http://www.articulate.com/rapid-elearning/are-your-e-learning-courses-pushed-or-pulled/
    60. 60. Activity•Draft a Decision making tree•Use short sentences or single words•Create a problem for the learner to solve•2 branches to solve, 3 choices per branch•Feedback on each choice•Content to support learners at each choice(e.g. video, sound, SOPs, PDF, policy etc.)
    61. 61. Activity•Create a simple interactive PowerPoint
    62. 62. PowerPoint, iSpring & simple interactivity Photo Credit: http://www.flickr.com/photos/68278595@N00/776111271/ CC http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/
    63. 63. Activity – PowerPointBuilding interaction between slidesAdding Audio & VideoTiming EffectsExport out to iSpringAdd to LMS (e.g. Moodle)
    64. 64. Cathy Moore http://blog.cathy-moore.com/
    65. 65. Rapid E-learning Blog http://www.articulate.com/rapid-eLearning/
    66. 66. Thank you
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