Engaging elearning
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Presentation for ACFE TAA eLearning competencies delivery Feb/March 2011

Presentation for ACFE TAA eLearning competencies delivery Feb/March 2011

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  • 1. Communicate information with no performance expectations. Information-based courses communicate new information but have no built-in expectations of changed performance. A good example is a course that highlights new features of a software application. You learn about the new the features but you aren’t required to do anything with this new information.2. Give step-by-step instructions that have specific outcomes. These courses are focused on procedures and how to do something. They’re made up of repeatable tasks that are very close to what the learner will do at work. A good example is showing someone how to complete a worksheet or use software.3. Share guidelines to help the learner solve problems. The most challenging courses to design are those where you teach principles or guidelines versus repeatable steps. You really have to understand the nuances of the learner’s situation and how the principles can be applied while respecting the fact that each application is somewhat unique.
  • 1. Communicate information with no performance expectations. Information-based courses communicate new information but have no built-in expectations of changed performance. A good example is a course that highlights new features of a software application. You learn about the new the features but you aren’t required to do anything with this new information.2. Give step-by-step instructions that have specific outcomes. These courses are focused on procedures and how to do something. They’re made up of repeatable tasks that are very close to what the learner will do at work. A good example is showing someone how to complete a worksheet or use software.3. Share guidelines to help the learner solve problems. The most challenging courses to design are those where you teach principles or guidelines versus repeatable steps. You really have to understand the nuances of the learner’s situation and how the principles can be applied while respecting the fact that each application is somewhat unique.
  • 1. Communicate information with no performance expectations. Information-based courses communicate new information but have no built-in expectations of changed performance. A good example is a course that highlights new features of a software application. You learn about the new the features but you aren’t required to do anything with this new information.2. Give step-by-step instructions that have specific outcomes. These courses are focused on procedures and how to do something. They’re made up of repeatable tasks that are very close to what the learner will do at work. A good example is showing someone how to complete a worksheet or use software.3. Share guidelines to help the learner solve problems. The most challenging courses to design are those where you teach principles or guidelines versus repeatable steps. You really have to understand the nuances of the learner’s situation and how the principles can be applied while respecting the fact that each application is somewhat unique.
  • 1. Communicate information with no performance expectations. Information-based courses communicate new information but have no built-in expectations of changed performance. A good example is a course that highlights new features of a software application. You learn about the new the features but you aren’t required to do anything with this new information.2. Give step-by-step instructions that have specific outcomes. These courses are focused on procedures and how to do something. They’re made up of repeatable tasks that are very close to what the learner will do at work. A good example is showing someone how to complete a worksheet or use software.3. Share guidelines to help the learner solve problems. The most challenging courses to design are those where you teach principles or guidelines versus repeatable steps. You really have to understand the nuances of the learner’s situation and how the principles can be applied while respecting the fact that each application is somewhat unique.
  • 1. Communicate information with no performance expectations. Information-based courses communicate new information but have no built-in expectations of changed performance. A good example is a course that highlights new features of a software application. You learn about the new the features but you aren’t required to do anything with this new information.2. Give step-by-step instructions that have specific outcomes. These courses are focused on procedures and how to do something. They’re made up of repeatable tasks that are very close to what the learner will do at work. A good example is showing someone how to complete a worksheet or use software.3. Share guidelines to help the learner solve problems. The most challenging courses to design are those where you teach principles or guidelines versus repeatable steps. You really have to understand the nuances of the learner’s situation and how the principles can be applied while respecting the fact that each application is somewhat unique.
  • 1. Communicate information with no performance expectations. Information-based courses communicate new information but have no built-in expectations of changed performance. A good example is a course that highlights new features of a software application. You learn about the new the features but you aren’t required to do anything with this new information.2. Give step-by-step instructions that have specific outcomes. These courses are focused on procedures and how to do something. They’re made up of repeatable tasks that are very close to what the learner will do at work. A good example is showing someone how to complete a worksheet or use software.3. Share guidelines to help the learner solve problems. The most challenging courses to design are those where you teach principles or guidelines versus repeatable steps. You really have to understand the nuances of the learner’s situation and how the principles can be applied while respecting the fact that each application is somewhat unique.
  • Organise Content into Small Chunks• Build Upon Prior Knowledge. Create processes where the learner can practice using the information in a context that integrates it with prior experience. (Case studies and practices exercises are good because they can be structured to combine the new information with the learner’s current understanding.)• Provide Real-World Context. (Create exercises and real-world scenarios that help the learner apply the new information into a workplace context. Problem-solving scenarios help develop thinking skills that can be transferred to the working environment)• Focus on meaning and not informationYou don’t even need to have big case studies. You can present some simple questions or problem-solving activities that require a solution. Essentially, you want to create a need for the information. Once the learner has a need, then they’re motivated to fulfill it. And that’s how you get the information to them.

Engaging elearning Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Engaging eLearning
  • 2. Student expectations
    In 2009, a survey of more than 3,600 VET students revealed that:
    90% of VET students say that they would like at least ‘a little’e-learning in their course.
    42% of VET students said that e-learning was a factor in their choice of training provider, with
    47% saying that e-learning influenced their choice of course to some degree
    http://e-learningindicators.flexiblelearning.net.au/docs/09results/2009BenchmarkingSurveyReport.pdf
  • 3. What are your learners expectations?
  • 4. Purpose
    Most e learning courses purpose is to share information or change/improve job role performance.
    However, most courses focus on sharing information rather than performance improvements. This happens because most people focus on delivering content rather than on changing job role performance.
  • 5. Push or Pull
  • 6. Push – Typical course structure
  • 7. Pull – Making learners work
  • 8. Pull – Making learners work
    http://www.articulate.com/rapid-elearning/are-your-e-learning-courses-pushed-or-pulled/
  • 9. How to?
    “How do we get the learners to pull this information?”
    • Well designed case studies or scenarios can create a need for the learners to pull the information.
    • 10. You can present some simple questions, decision making trees or problem-solving activities that require a solution.
  • All shapes & sizes
    Learners exhibit a variety of learning style preferences
    Active
    Reflective
    Visual
    Experiential
    Auditory
    Sensing
  • 11. Engaging eLearning
    Organise Content into Small Chunks
    Build Upon Prior Knowledge.
    Create processes where the learner can practice using the information in a context that integrates it with prior experience.
    Provide Real-World Context.
    Focus on meaning and not information
  • 12. Engaging eLearning
    Tap into the learner’s motivation.
    Have the learners do something with the information that you give them.
    Make learning about solving problems rather than repeating information
    Ask learners how the course content is relevant.
    Confirm that the scenarios are accurate and realistic
    Use of Text with Images, Slideshows, PowerPoint presentations, Video and Audio
  • 13. Engaging eLearning
    Get the learners to create the learning materials:
    Video
    Audio
    quiz questions
    decision making trees
    product manuals/resources
  • 14. Industry Knowledge
    • Industry experts(audio/video)
    • 15. Discussion forums(sharing knowledge/ideas)
    • 16. Group Work(with mentor)
    • 17. Action Learning Sets(finding solutions to workplace issues)
    • 18. Using Social Media to follow Industry events/conferences/people
    • 19. Learners creating reports in variety of formats
  • Your Model needs to be fit with
    Your ability as a trainer/designer
    Your learners abilities with technology
    An analysis of your course delivery
    Your ability to apply it to other training you do
    Your organisation supports and infrastructure
  • 20.
    • Gallery of e learning strategieshttp://designing.flexiblelearning.net.au/gallery/all.htm
    • 21. Australian Flexible Learning Frameworkhttp://www.flexiblelearning.net.au/
    • 22. Jane Harthttp://www.c4lpt.co.uk/jane.html
    • 23. Sue Watershttp://aquaculturepda.wikispaces.com/
    • 24. The Rapid eLearning Bloghttp://www.articulate.com/rapid-elearning/
    • 25. Cathy Moore-Making Changehttp://blog.cathy-moore.com/
    -
    Resources